Clear Lake Annotated Bibliography

August 29, 2011

 

By Kristina L. Weber, Lisa C. Thompson, Gregory A. Giusti, and Ryan F. Keiffer

University of California Cooperative Extension

Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology Department

UC Davis, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616

Contact: lcthompson@ucdavis.edu

 

This bibliography contains 302 references, including journal articles, books, reports, newspaper articles, and videos.

The main focus was on fish, particularly Clear Lake hitch and largemouth bass, but there are also references on culture,

settlement, mining, and lake water chemistry.

 

Items are listed in alphabetical order by author, beginning with anonymous works (no author listed).

 

A version of this bibliography is available in EndNote, at no cost. 

Please contact Lisa Thompson at lcthompson@ucdavis.edu to obtain a copy.

 

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 211

Year: 1850

Title: From California-Clear Lake Indian Massacre

Newspaper: New-Hampshire Patriot

Place Published: Concord, New Hampshire

Issue Date: July 11, 1850

Short Title: From California-Clear Lake Indian Massacre

Notes: html ONLINE; settlement

URL: http://docs.newsbank.com/s/HistArchive/ahnpdoc/EANX/10C296745F173A80/0D0CB57AEDE52A75

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 255

Year: 1857-1876

Title: Scrapbooks on San Francisco water, 1857-1876

Frequency: 2

Issue Date: 1857-1876

Type of Article: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 20040427

Short Title: Scrapbooks on San Francisco water, 1857-1876

Accession Number: OCLC: 122382996 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - MS OV 5085 CHS

Keywords: Water-supply -- California -- San Francisco.

Abstract: Newspaper clippings (and a few documents), chiefly on San Francisco's water supply: rainfall, reservoirs, water companies, water in mining, hydrants. Water companies mentioned include: San Francisco Water Works Co.; Bensley Water Co., Spring Valley Water Co., San Mateo Water Co., Mountain Home Water Co., Pacific Water Co. Volume 1 (1857-1871) also includes clippings on Central Pacific Railroad construction; coal at Mt. Diablo; San Francisco Fire Dept.; law (e.g., regarding private corporations, and mining); Croton reservoir in N.Y.; a burst dam in Sheffield, England; and construction of a railway tunnel in Mont Cenis, France. Volume 2 (1875-1876) includes several illustrations from Thistleton's Illustrated Jolly Giant on pollution of Spring Valley water by Lock's ranch, and clippings on lakes (Lake Merced, Clear Lake, Blue Lakes, mountain lakes), water supply of N.Y., and street paving.

Notes: clear lake

ill. ; 36 cm.

Pages are unnumbered, and blank pages were not included in the page count./ Previously listed as Magee Scrapbook. More Records: Show record information

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 256

Year: 1859

Title: Another California Curiosity-Borax Lake

Newspaper: The Pittsfield Sun

Place Published: Pittsfield, Massachusetts

Issue Date: January 20, 1859

Short Title: Another California Curiosity-Borax Lake

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; pollution; html ONLINE

 

-borax lake

-sulphur lake

URL: http://docs.newsbank.com/s/HistArchive/ahnpdoc/EANX/1064829133808769/0D0CB57AEDE52A75

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 257

Year: 1866

Title: The Lake County Democrat

Newspaper: The Lake County Democrat

Place Published: Lakeport, Lake Co., Cal.

Publisher: E.F. Lemar & W.B. James Place: United States; California; Lake; Lakeport.

Pages: Vol. 1, no. 1 (May 9, 1866)-; v.

Issue Date: 1866-1800s

Type of Article: Serial

Short Title: The Lake County Democrat

ISSN: LCCN: sn 93-52047

Accession Number: OCLC: 28536867 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - BANC NMP 4284:11 Bancroft UCB and NRLF; MICROFILM 78779 News Micro UCB

Keywords: Lake County (Calif.) -- Newspapers.

Notes: clear lake; fish

Weekly

Newspaper (new)

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 91

Year: 1888

Title: The Clear Lake press

Newspaper: The Clear Lake press

Place Published: Lower Lake, Calif.

Publisher: J.B. Baccus, Jr. Place: United States; California; Lake; Lower Lake.

Pages: Began in 1886.; v. ; 61 cm.

Issue Date: 1886-1900s

Type of Article: Serial

Short Title: The Clear Lake press

ISSN: LCCN: sn 85-66441

Accession Number: OCLC: 12982966 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - BANC NMP 4284:12 Bancroft UCB and NRLF; MICROFILM 78779 Micro News UCB; CSL

Keywords: Lake County (Calif.) -- Newspapers.

Lower Lake (Calif.) -- Newspapers.

Notes: clear lake

Weekly

Description based on: Vol. 3, no. 15 (Oct. 20, 1888).

Newspaper (new)

 

 

Reference Type:  Audiovisual Material

Record Number: 258

Year: 1900

Title: The Indians of California Photograph Collection, [ca.1900s]

Date: 1900

Type: Archival Material

Short Title: The Indians of California Photograph Collection, [ca.1900s]

Accession Number: OCLC: 62257212 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - Mss 71 special collections; UCSB

Keywords: Indians of North America -- California -- History.

Indians of North American -- California -- History.

Abstract: The collection contains 69 black and white photographs of California Native Americans, apparently the Yokut of the San Joaquin Valley, Miwok of Yosemite, and the Pomo of the Clear Lake Basin - with captions indicating activities such as arrow making, basket making, fishing, hunting, and village life. Used at one point as educational packets, these appear to be relatively recent photos, not 19th century or early 20th century ethnographic images.

Notes: native american; photo

Use of the collection is unrestricted./ Use governed by UCSB Special Collections' policy./ Preferred citation: Cite as: [Identification of item], The Indians of California Photograph Collection, Mss 71, Department of Special Collections, Davidson Library, University of California, Santa Barbara./ Finding aid available in the Department of Special Collections and on the Internet./ Acquisition Information: Purchase, 1987-1988.

URL: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt6199p09b

Note: Finding aid http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt6199p09b

 

 

Reference Type:  Manuscript

Record Number: 259

Year: 1917

Title: An abbreviated history of the fight between the Lake County people and the Yolo Water & Power Company for possession of our Lake County waters, [1917?]

Pages: 18 leaves ; 34 cm.

Date: 1917

Type of Work: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19980501

Short Title: An abbreviated history of the fight between the Lake County people and the Yolo Water & Power Company for possession of our Lake County waters, [1917?]

Accession Number: OCLC: 39048533 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - MS 86/7 459.3.8a WRCA UCB

Keywords: Water rights -- California -- Lake County -- History.

Water rights -- California -- Yolo County -- History.

Water diversion -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County) -- History.

Yolo Power and Water Company.

Clear Lake (Lake County, Calif.) -- Water rights -- History.

Cache Creek (Lake County and Yolo County, Calif.) -- Water rights -- History.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: water rights; settlement

Typescript, with holograph annotations.

Manuscript (mss)

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 260

Year: 1919

Title: The people of the state of California, plaintiff, vs. Yolo Water and Power Company, a corporation, defendant, F.G. Burrows, et al., intervenors, 1919 December

Number of Pages: 2 leaves ; 34 cm.

Date: 1919

Type of Work: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19980501

Short Title: The people of the state of California, plaintiff, vs. Yolo Water and Power Company, a corporation, defendant, F.G. Burrows, et al., intervenors, 1919 December

Abbreviation: At head of title:; In the Superior Court of the state of California, in and for the county of Lake

Accession Number: OCLC: 39048450 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - MS 86/7 455.2e UCB WRCA

Keywords: Irrigation -- California -- Yolo County.

Water rights -- California -- Yolo County.

Water rights -- California -- Lake County.

Water diversion -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Yolo Power and Water Company.

Clear Lake (Lake County, Calif.) -- Water rights.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: wate rights

California.; Superior Court (Lake County)

Typescript (carbon).

Manuscript (mss)

Research Notes: UCD

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 261

Year: 1936

Title: Deepen the irrigation channel between Clear Lake and Lost River, in the state of California : report (to accompany H.R. 6773)

Series Title: Report / 74th Congress, 2d session, Senate;; no. 2228; Variation: United States.; Congress.; Senate.; Report ; 74th Congress, no. 2228.

Place Published: [Washington, D.C.?

Institution: U.S. G.P.O.

Pages: 2 p.

Short Title: Deepen the irrigation channel between Clear Lake and Lost River, in the state of California : report (to accompany H.R. 6773)

Accession Number: OCLC: 29179214 Provider: OCLC

Call Number:call # - Y 1.1/2: 09989 1936 no. 2228 Univ of Central Oklahoma lib use only

Keywords: Channels (Hydraulic engineering) -- California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; settlement; flood control

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.

23 cm.

Caption title./ "June 1 ... 1936."

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 262

Year: 1939

Title: Preliminary examination, flood control Sacramento and San Joaquin River valleys, California. Appendix K, Clear Lake area

Place Published: Sacramento

Publisher: The Corps

Number of Volumes: 1

Short Title: Preliminary examination, flood control Sacramento and San Joaquin River valleys, California. Appendix K, Clear Lake area

Accession Number: OCLC: 24022035 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G430 F6 App.K WRCA at NRLF UCB

Keywords: Flood control -- California -- Sacramento River Watershed.

Flood control -- California -- San Joaquin River Watershed.

Clear Lake (Lake County, Calif.)

Kelsey Creek (Calif.)

Adobe Creek (Lake County, Calif.)

Middle Creek (Calif.)

Clover Creek (Calif.)

Scotts Creek (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: flood control

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers.

ill., maps ; 37 cm.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 263

Year: 1939

Title: Report on Clear Lake-Cache Creek flood control investigation

Place Published: [Sacramento, Calif.]

Publisher: State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Water Resources

Number of Volumes: 1

Number of Pages: (various pagings)

Short Title: Report on Clear Lake-Cache Creek flood control investigation

Accession Number: OCLC: 13902174 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - TC424.C2 R4 1939 PhySciEng UCD

 

LC: TC424.C2; Dewey: 627.474

Keywords: Flood control -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Flood control -- California -- Cache Creek (Lake County and Yolo County)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: flood control

California.; Division of Water Resources.

ill., maps ; 28 cm.

"February, 1939."

State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Water Resources. More Records: Show record information

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 264

Year: 1950

Title: A preliminary report on fish and wildlife resources in relation to the Clear Lake and Cache Creek Project, California

Place Published: Portland (Ore.)

Publisher: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service

Number of Pages: ii, 17 leaves, 1 leaf of plates

Short Title: A preliminary report on fish and wildlife resources in relation to the Clear Lake and Cache Creek Project, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 33001797 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC I 49.2:C 58/2x Shields UCD gov info stacks

 

LC: TC425.C3

Keywords: Water resources development -- California -- Cache Creek.

Wildlife conservation -- California -- Cache Creek.

Fishery management -- California -- Cache Creek.

Cache Creek (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

ill., map ; 27 cm.

"June 1950."

United States Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

-           Pg 5

- Scotts, middle, clover, doba(?), Kelsey, cole

-           Pg 8

- Above Indian valley dam site:

    - Rainbow trout, sac sucker, native cyprinids (sac Pikeminnow)

- Kelsey, scotts, clover, middle-hitch spawning streams

    - Important forage fish

    - Spawn late march and early april

- Small trout fisheries on scotts, middle and clover

- Indian valley-flood control

-           Pg 17

- Kelseyville dam would result in insignificant fishery loss

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 265

Year: 1954

Title: Engineering report on report of Soil Conservation Service, United States Department of Agriculture on Adobe Creek watershed protection project, Lake County, California

Place Published: [Sacramento]

Publisher: The Division

Number of Pages: 32 leaves

Short Title: Engineering report on report of Soil Conservation Service, United States Department of Agriculture on Adobe Creek watershed protection project, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 24358094 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G458 H4 WRCS UCB; P2500 .A45 STATE LIB CSL

Keywords: Watershed management -- California -- Adobe Creek Watershed (Lake County)

Adobe Creek Watershed (Lake County, Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary; soil

California. Division of Water Resources. ; United States.; Soil Conservation Service.

ill., photos. ; 28 cm.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 266

Year: 1954

Title: Work plan for the Adobe Creek subwatershed of the Cache Creek Watershed in Lake County, California

Place Published: Portland, Ore.

Publisher: The Service

Number of Volumes: 1

Short Title: Work plan for the Adobe Creek subwatershed of the Cache Creek Watershed in Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 24351697 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G458 H4-1 WRCS UCB

Keywords: Cache Creek Watershed (Calif.)

Adobe Creek Watershed (Calif.)

Lake County (Calif.)

Lake County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

United States. Soil Conservation Service. ; Big Valley Soil Conservation District. ; United States.; Forest Service.

ill., maps ; 27 cm.

Cover title: Work plan, Adobe Creek watershed, California.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 267

Year: 1958

Title: Watershed work plan Adobe Creek watershed, Lake County, California

Place Published: Palo Alto, Calif.

Publisher: George S. Nolte

Number of Pages: 39, [31] p.

Short Title: Watershed work plan Adobe Creek watershed, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 227012134 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G458 H8-1 WRCA UCB

Keywords: Watershed management -- California -- Lake County.

Adobe Creek (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

George S. Nolte and Associates. ; Lake County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (Calif.) ; Big Valley Soil Conservation District (Calif.) ; United States.; Soil Conservation Service. ; United States.; Forest Service.

ill., map ; 28 cm.

"March 1958."/ "Prepared under the authority of the Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act (Public Law 566, 83d Congress, 68 Stat. 666) as amended by the Act of August 7, 1956 (Public Law 1018, 84th Congress, 70 Stat. 1088)".

prepared by George S. Nolte ; for Lake County Flood Control and Water Conservation District [and] Big Valley Soil Conservation District ; with assistance by U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service [and] U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 268

Year: 1959

Title: A reconnaissance study to investigate the feasibility of the Scotts Creek watershed project for construction under the Federal watershed protection and flood prevention act as amended : a report for the State Soil Conservation Commission

Place Published: [Sacramento?

Publisher: s.n.]

Number of Pages: 15 p.

Short Title: A reconnaissance study to investigate the feasibility of the Scotts Creek watershed project for construction under the Federal watershed protection and flood prevention act as amended : a report for the State Soil Conservation Commission

Accession Number: OCLC: 58854758 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - N530 .S31 STATE LIB CSL

 

GovDoc: N530.S31

Keywords: Watersheds -- California -- Lake County.

Watershed management -- California -- Lake County.

Soil conservation -- California -- Lake County.

Scotts Creek watershed (Lake County, Calif.)

Lake County (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

California. Division of Soil Conservation. ; California.; State Soil Conservation Commission.

ill., map.

[Prepared under the authority of the Watershed protection and flood prevention act (Public law 566, 83rd Congress; 68 Stat. 666), as amended].

Feasibility of the Scotts Creek watershed project.; United States.; Watershed protection and flood prevention act.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Unpublished Work

Record Number: 553

Year: 1962-1980

Title of Work: Clear Lake Commercial Catch Records

Place Published: Yountville

Institution: State of California- The Resources Agency

Department: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Clear Lake Commercial Catch Records

Abstract: Commercial catch and by-catch records recorded by individual anglers, years dating 1962-1980. Species recorded include: Carp, Blackfish, Hitch, Channel catfish, White catfish, Brown bullhead, Crappie, Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, Sacramento Perch.

Research Notes: Catch records were photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 269

Year: 1963

Title: Transcript of public hearing on Scotts Creek, Cache Creek Basin, California : held in Lakeport, California, 4 June 1963

Place Published: Sacramento, Calif.

Publisher: U.S. Army Engineer District, Sacramento Corps of Engineers

Number of Volumes: 1

Number of Pages: (various foliations)

Short Title: Transcript of public hearing on Scotts Creek, Cache Creek Basin, California : held in Lakeport, California, 4 June 1963

Accession Number: OCLC: 36321762 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # -  MS 97/1 C32 1963  WRCA UCB

Keywords: Flood control -- California -- Cache Creek Watershed (Lake County and Yolo County) -- Planning -- Citizen participation.

Flood control -- California -- Scotts Creek -- Planning -- Citizen participation.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

United States.; Army.; Corps of Engineers.; Sacramento District.

map ; 28 cm.

Transcript of public hearing held in connection with plans for Scotts Creek, Cache Creek Basin, California; Public hearing on plans for flood control on Scott's Creek, Cache Creek Basin, California

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 270

Year: 1965

Title: Scotts Creek, Cache Creek Basin, California. : Letter from the Secretary of the Army transmitting a letter from the Chief of Engineers ... dated July 27, 1965, submitting a report

Series Title: 89th Cong., 1st Sess. House Document ;; no. 259;

Place Published: Washington

Publisher: GPO

Number of Pages: 133 p.

Short Title: Scotts Creek, Cache Creek Basin, California. : Letter from the Secretary of the Army transmitting a letter from the Chief of Engineers ... dated July 27, 1965, submitting a report

Accession Number: OCLC: 24359199 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G458 J5-1 WRCA UCB; D 103.22:Sco 8 SSH UCSD

 

LC: TC425 .C3

Keywords: Scotts Creek Watershed (Calif.)

Lake County (Calif.)

Cache Creek Watershed (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

United States. Dept. of the Army. ; United States.; Army.; Corps of Engineers.

folded map ; 26 cm.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 103

Year: 1966

Title: Clear Lake water quality investigation

Series Title: Its Bulletin; no. 143-2; Variation: California.; Dept. of Water Resources.; Bulletin ;; no. 143-2.

Publisher: [Sacramento]

Number of Pages: xvi, 202 p. illus., maps (part fold.) 28 cm.

Short Title: Clear Lake water quality investigation

ISBN: LCCN: 66-64396

Accession Number: OCLC: 9588709 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G400 XW7 no.143-2 WRCS UCB; TD224.C2 A5 no.143-2 Langson UCI; TA224 C3A3 no.143-2 Science UCR; TC824.C2 A2 no.143:2 NRLF; TD224.C3 C123c SRLF; W750 .B9 no.143-2 STATE LIB CSL

 

LC: TD370 More Records: Show record information

Keywords: Water quality -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake

California. Dept. of Water Resources.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 104

Year: 1966

Title: Report on debris reduction and removal at Clear Lake : prepared pursuant to Senate Concurrent resolution no. 16, 1964 Legislative Session, 1st Extra Session

Place Published: [Sacramento?

Publisher: s.n.

Number of Pages: 28 p.

Short Title: Report on debris reduction and removal at Clear Lake : prepared pursuant to Senate Concurrent resolution no. 16, 1964 Legislative Session, 1st Extra Session

Accession Number: OCLC: 58745654 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - L260 .D4 State Lib CSL

 

GovDoc: L260.D4

Keywords: Refuse and refuse disposal -- California -- Clear Lake.

Clear Lake (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake

California. State Lands Commission.

ill., map.

Debris reductiona and removal at Clear Lake.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 554

Year: 1969

Title: Fishery Survey 1969

Place Published: Region III

Publisher: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Fishery Survey 1969

Abstract: Methods of take for survey included 21 foot Marinovitch otter trawl, 3/8 inch beach seine 80 x 8 feet, and 6 200 foot electroshock transects. Results yielded 16 species of fish including 33 goldfish, not previously recorded. Undeveloped shoreline yielded most fish. Silversides are now widespread. Bass Growth rates are rapid and compares rate to earlier study (Murphy, 1951). Hitch listed as abundant.

Research Notes: Photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

 

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 271

Year: 1969

Title: Water Quality Control Study, English Ridge Reservoir, Eel River Basin, California

Type: Clean water rept

Short Title: Water Quality Control Study, English Ridge Reservoir, Eel River Basin, California

Accession Number: PB2284354

Call Number:call # - TD224.C3 U56 Shields UCD

Keywords: Water pollution; English Ridge Reservoir; Eel River Basin; California

Water quality control; Water quality standards

50B Civil Engineering: Civil Engineering

Abstract: Construction and operation of the English Ridge Reservoir, as proposed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, together with the naturally available flows from the remaining drainage area, will provide flows in the Eel River downstream from English Ridge Reservoir that will be sufficient to maintain adequate water quality for the fishery and other beneficial uses of the river's waters. The planned diversion of stored water through Clear Lake will enhance the water quality of Clear Lake, and thereby improve its aesthetic and recreational values. (Modified author abstract)

Notes: clear lake

Performer: Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, San Francisco, Calif. Southwest Region. Aug 1969. 69p.

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 272

Year: 1971

Title: Economic development and water demands Clear Lake Basin

Place Published: [S.l.]

Publisher: The District

Number of Pages: 28 leaves

Short Title: Economic development and water demands Clear Lake Basin

Accession Number: OCLC: 22475100 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G4581 K1 WRCA UCB

Keywords: Water use -- California -- Lake County.

Water-supply -- California -- Lake County.

Clear Lake Basin (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement; clear lake

California.; Dept. of Water Resources.; Northern District.

map ; 28 cm.

Memorandum report./ "March 1971."

California Dept. of Water Resources, Northern District.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 273

Year: 1971

Title: Lakeport Lake, Scotts Creek, California : site selection

Series Title: Design memorandum ;; 4;

Place Published: Sacramento

Publisher: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District

Number of Pages: [69] p. in various pagings

Short Title: Lakeport Lake, Scotts Creek, California : site selection

Accession Number: OCLC: 32840390 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC D 103.62:L 34/FINALx Shields UCD gov info stacks

 

LC: TD221 .C3

Keywords: Scotts Creek (Calif.)

Clearlake (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Sacramento District.

maps, folded plates ; 27 cm.

Cover title./ "March 1971."

Department of the Army, Sacramento District, Corps of Engineers.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 274

Year: 1972

Title: Lakeport Lake Project, Scotts Creek, California

Type: Draft environmental impact statement

Short Title: Lakeport Lake Project, Scotts Creek, California

Accession Number: EISCA725528D

Call Number:call # - DOC D 103.62:L 34/FINALx Shields UCD gov info stacks

Keywords: Environmental surveys; Dams; California; Multiple purpose reservoirs;

Construction; Flood control; Water supply; Recreational facilities;

Land use; Runoff

Environmental impact statements; Land inundation

68 Environmental Pollution & Control

Abstract: The project consists of construction of a rolled earth and rockfill dam and creation of a multiple purpose reservoir in Lake County, California, for the purpose of flood protection, water supply, and recreation. Environmental effects include land inundation and increase in agricultural runoff into a lake.

Notes: tributary

Performer: Army Engineer District, Sacramento, Calif. Aug 1972. 77p. Report: ELR5528

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 275

Year: 1972

Title: Water quality study : effects of Lakeport Project on Scotts Creek and Clear Lake

Place Published: San Francisco, Calif.

Publisher: Brown and Caldwell

Number of Pages: ii, 44, [6] leaves

Short Title: Water quality study : effects of Lakeport Project on Scotts Creek and Clear Lake

Accession Number: OCLC: 14269605 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC D 103.62:L 34/FINALx Shields UCD gov info stacks

 

LC: TD224 .C3

Keywords: Lakeport Project (Calif.)

Clearlake (Calif.)

Scotts Creek (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary

Brown and Caldwell. ; United States.; Army.; Corps of Engineers.; Sacramento District.

ill., map ; 28 cm.

Report prepared for U.S. Army Engineer District, Sacramento, California./ October 1972./ Includes bibliographical references.

Brown and Caldwell.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 278

Year: 1973

Title: Lakeport Lake, Scotts Creek, California, general design

Place Published: Sacramento

Publisher: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District

Number of Volumes: 1

Short Title: Lakeport Lake, Scotts Creek, California, general design

Accession Number: OCLC: 31401724 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC D 103.62:L 34/FINALx Shields UCD gov info stacks

 

LC: TD221 .C3

Keywords: Scotts Creek (Calif.)

Clearlake (Calif.)

Notes: tributary

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Sacramento District.

maps, folded plates ; 27 cm.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 276

Year: 1973

Title: Offshore core drilling, Clear Lake, Lake County, W 9634, U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, Branch of Western Environmental Geology

Place Published: [Sacramento?

Publisher: s.n.

Number of Pages: [1], 3 p.

Short Title: Offshore core drilling, Clear Lake, Lake County, W 9634, U.S. Department of Interior, Geological Survey, Branch of Western Environmental Geology

Accession Number: OCLC: 34452585 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - L260 .E5 no.120 mainlib UCB Government Information Center, Calif and State lib CSL govt pubs

 

GovDoc: L260.E5 no.120

Keywords: Drilling and boring.

Clearlake (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; mine

California. State Lands Commission. ; Geological Survey (U.S.)

Environmental impact report, 120.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 279

Year: 1973

Title: Supplement to the final environmental statement, Indian Valley Project, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Yolo County, California

Place Published: Sacramento, Calif.

Publisher: The Bureau

Number of Volumes: 1

Short Title: Supplement to the final environmental statement, Indian Valley Project, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Yolo County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 25101957 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC I 27.70:Y 7/SUPP.x Shields UCD gov info stacks

Keywords: Environmental quality -- California.

Water resources development -- Environmental aspects.

Indian Valley Project (Calif.)

Clear Lake (Yolo County, Calif.)

Notes: clear lake; dam

United States. Bureau of Reclamation. ; Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (Calif.)

ill. ; 27 cm.

Includes Addendum, 5 p./ Cover title.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 277

Year: 1973

Title: Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (PL 84-984), Yolo County, California

Type: Supplement to Final environmental impact statement

Short Title: Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (PL 84-984), Yolo County, California

Accession Number: EISCA731673F

Call Number:call # - DOC I 27.70:Y 7/SUPP.x Shields UCD gov info stacks

Keywords: Environmental impact statements; Multiple purpose reservoirs;

California; Flood control; Water storage; Clear Lake

Indian Valley Dam; Yolo County(California); Lake County(California)

68H Environmental Pollution & Control: Environmental Impact

Statements

Abstract: The supplement to the final environmental statement for the Indian Valley Project of the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District addresses the question of whether or not the operation of the Indian Valley Project will adversely affect the water surface levels of Clear Lake in Lake County, California. The supplement concludes that the operation of the Indian Valley Dam and Reservoir will not affect the water surface levels of Clear Lake.

Notes: clear lake; dam

Performer: Bureau of Reclamation, Sacramento, Calif. Mid-Pacific Regional Office. 23 Oct 1973. 51p. Report: ELR73-1673,; FES73-61

See also PB-202 184-F.

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 280

Year: 1974

Title: Flood plain information : Big Valley Streams (Manning, Adobe, Kelsey, and Cole Creeks), Kelseyville, California

Place Published: Sacramento, Calif.

Publisher: The District

Number of Pages: ii, 44 p., 21 leaves of plates (14 fold.)

Short Title: Flood plain information : Big Valley Streams (Manning, Adobe, Kelsey, and Cole Creeks), Kelseyville, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 5693168 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC D 103.47:K 44x Shields UCD gov info stacks

 

LC: TC423

Keywords: Floods -- California -- Kelseyville.

Flood control -- California -- Kelseyville.

Manning Creek Watershed (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement; tributary; dam

United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. Sacramento District.

ill., maps ; 27 cm.

Cover title./ Part of illustrative matter in pocket.

Big Valley Streams (Manning, Adobe, Kelsey, and Cole Creeks), Kelseyville, California.

by the Department of the Army, Sacramento District, Corps of Engineers ; prepared for Lake County.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

-plate 1

            -stream gauge on Adobe

-i

            -Manning, Adobe, Kelsey, Cole creeks subject to flood Kelseyville and surrounding area

            -damaged property from floods in 1955, 1958, 1964-1965

-pg 1

            -permanent occupation of Big Valley (1830’s)

            -Salvador and Juan Vallejo herded long horn cattle for hide and tallow

            -1847, Vallejos sold cattle to four Americans

            -mid 1850’s, entire valley floor occupied

            -dry farmed wheat, dairying, barley, oats, corn, milk (cheese)

            -1880’s, prunes

            -1885, Bartlett pear introduction

            -1857, general store, blacksmith-wagon making shop built

            -1864, two stores and boarding house built

            -1880’s, post office in Finley

-pg 3

            -original vegetation (valley oak, native grasses) modified by agriculture (clearing)

            -climate, dry summer and wet winters

            -precipitation: 25 inches in Clear Lake to 60 inches at Cobb Mountain

            -temperature: about 40s in January to about 70s in July

            -pear and walnut orchards

-pg 7

            -stream gauges:

                        -Highland Creek above Highland Creek dam (October 1962- )

                        -Adobe near Kelseyville (October 1954- )

                        -Kelsey near Kelseyville (October 1946- )

-pg 8

            -Clear Lake Highlands, normal annual precipitation is 23.6 inches

-pg 10

            -structures across Big Valley streams (Table 4)

-pg 19

            -floods: 1861-1862, 1881, 1889-1890, 1895, 19 more from 1902-1974

            -stage of 7.56 feet on rumsey gage exceeded 47 times. Nine feet exceeded 23 times since 1874

-pg 21

            -largest floods

                        -December 22, 1964 and January 23, 1970: 1500 cfs on Adobe

                        -December 21, 1955: 8800 cfs on Kelsey

            -highest rumsey, 13.66 feet

-pg 33

            -table 8, obstructions

 

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 281

Year: 1975

Title: The fish and wildlife resources of Anderson Marsh, Clear Lake, Lake County

Place Published: [Sacramento, Calif.]

Publisher: State of California, Dept. of Fish and Game

Number of Pages: iii, 21 leaves

Short Title: The fish and wildlife resources of Anderson Marsh, Clear Lake, Lake County

Accession Number: OCLC: 21647772 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QL84.22.C2 F5 Shields UCD

Keywords: Wildlife conservation -- California -- Anderson Marsh.

Zoology -- California -- Anderson Marsh.

Freshwater fishes -- California -- Anderson Marsh.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

California.; Dept. of Fish and Game.

map ; 28 cm.

"January 1975."/ "Resources report."/ Includes bibliographical references (leaf 20). More Records: Show record information

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

-           i

- Anderson marsh is about 50% of valuable natural resources left at Clear Lake

- Riparian woodland and marshes, 2 of the most biotically productive habitat types

-           Pg 2

- Anderson march ~560 acres marsh and riparian vegetation

-           Pg 5

- Importance of tule marsh for feeding and spawning (Puckett 1972)

- 900 acres of marshland in CL (2% of CL’s surface area)

-           Pg 7

- Anderson marsh creek census (1973)

    - 97% brown bullhead, 3% carp/crappie/bluegill/green sunfish

-           Pg 8

- Electrofishing results (1973)

    - 92.5% carp/brown bullhead/goldfish, also included bluegill, largemouth bass, white catfish, black crappie, hitch, sacrmento perch

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 115

Year: 1976

Title: Special historical section

Newspaper: Clear Lake Observer-American

Place Published: Clearlake Highlands, Calif.

Publisher: Clear Lake Observer American

Pages: 24 p.

Short Title: Special historical section

Accession Number: OCLC: 19520144 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - pff F868.L2C48 Bancroft UCB

Keywords: American Revolution Bicentennial, 1776-1976 -- California -- Lake County.

Newspapers -- California.

Lake County (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake

ill. ; 39 cm.

The special section of the July 1, 1976 issue of the Clear Lake Observer American.

Clear Lake Observer American.

Clear Lake Observer American. More Records: Show record information

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 282

Year: 1979

Title: Phase I inspection report for Adobe Creek Dam

Series Title: National dam inspection program.;

Place Published: [Sacramento]

Publisher: Calif. Dept. of Water Resources. Div. of Safety of Dams

Number of Volumes: 1

Number of Pages: (various pagings)

Short Title: Phase I inspection report for Adobe Creek Dam

Accession Number: OCLC: 31916184 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - US ARMY CORPS OF ENG, SACRAMENTO

 

LC: TC557

Keywords: Dams -- California -- Lake County -- Inspection.

Dam safety -- California -- Lake County.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary; dam; flood control

California. Dept. of Water Resources. Division of Safety of Dams. ; California.; Dept. of Water Resources.; Division of Safety of Dams. ; United States.; Army.; Corps of Engineers.; Sacramento District.

ill., photos, charts, maps ; 28 cm.

prepared for Department of the Army, the Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District by State of California, the Resources Agency, Department of Water Resources, Division of Safety of Dams.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 283

Year: 1980

Title: Clear Lake Bass Record Set

Newspaper: Oakland Post (1968-1981)

Pages: 8

Short Title: Clear Lake Bass Record Set

Abstract: Fish and Game planted Florida-strain bass for three years, 1969, 1970, and 1971, in an attempt to create a trophy-size population of largemouth bass in Clear Lake. The southern bass live longer, grow bigger, and are harder to catch than the northern strain of bass which were originally placed in the lake prior to 1900. The record fish was the second known bass weighing more than 10 pounds to be taken in the lake this summer.

Notes: html online; fish

588-589

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=492028411&Fmt=7&clientId=1567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

 

Reference Type:  Unpublished Work

Record Number: 555

Year: 1981-2000

Title of Work: Clear Lake Commercial Catch Records

Place Published: Yountville

Institution: State of California- The Resources Agency

Department: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Clear Lake Commercial Catch Records

Abstract: Commercial catch and by-catch records recorded by individual anglers, years dating 1962-1980. Species recorded include: Carp, Blackfish, Hitch, Channel catfish, White catfish, Brown bullhead, Crappie, Bluegill, Largemouth Bass, Sacramento Perch.

Research Notes: Catch records were photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 284

Year: 1986

Title: Lake County flood control study : Forbes Creek and Cole Creek

Place Published: [Sacramento]

Publisher: California Dept. of Water Resources, Northern District

Number of Pages: viii, 83 p.

Short Title: Lake County flood control study : Forbes Creek and Cole Creek

Accession Number: OCLC: 14232227 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - W750 .L22 State lib CSL

 

LC: GB1399.4.U676

Keywords: Flood control -- California -- Lake County.

Floodplain management -- California -- Lake County.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary; flood control

California.; Dept. of Water Resources.; Northern District. ; Lake County (Calif.).; Flood Control and Water Conservation District.

graphs, maps ; 28 cm.

At head of title: State of California, The Resources Agency, Department of Water Resources, Northern District./ "April 1986."/ Funding: Cooperative study by the Department of Water Resources and the Lake County Flood Control and Water Conservation District.

[prepared by Mark R. Stuart, August J. Bill ; assisted by Glen S. Pearson ... et al.]. More Records: Show record information

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 285

Year: 1987

Title: Numerical simulation of the response of Cache Creek to the modification of the Clear Lake Outlet

Place Published: Sacramento CA

Publisher: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Number of Volumes: 1

Number of Pages: (various pagings)

Short Title: Numerical simulation of the response of Cache Creek to the modification of the Clear Lake Outlet

Accession Number: OCLC: 32371501 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QE75 .P7 no.562A PhySciEng UCD

 

LC: TC425 .C3

Keywords: Sediment transport -- California -- Cache Creek.

Sedimentation and deposition -- Mathematical models.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: soil; clear lake

United States.; Army.; Corps of Engineers.; Sacramento District.

ill., charts ; 29 cm.

prepared by the Hydrologic Engineering Center for U.S. Army Engineer District, Sacramento.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 556

Year: 1990

Title: Clear Lake Fish Plantings and Funding

Publisher: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Clear Lake Fish Plantings and Funding

Abstract: DFG Memo listing # of Northern black bass, Channel catfish, Florida black crappie, and Florida black bass from 1968-1990. Sources of funding include: Department of Fish and Game, Private funding, Clear Lake Bass Masters, County of Lake (Lakebed Management), AB 1905 funds

Research Notes: Photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

 

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 286

Year: 1997

Title: First annual Clear Lake Science and Management Symposium, September 13, 1997 : proceedings volume

Place Published: Lakeport, Calif.

Publisher: The Center

Number of Pages: 181 p.

Short Title: First annual Clear Lake Science and Management Symposium, September 13, 1997 : proceedings volume

Accession Number: OCLC: 44175500 Provider: OCLC

Keywords: Hydrology -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Water quality -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Limnology -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Aquatic pests -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Notes: clear lake symposium; contains many articles

University of California, Davis.; Clear Lake Environmental Research Center. Conf Author(s): Clear Lake Science and Management Symposium (1st : 1997 : Lakeport, Calif.)

ill., maps ; 28 cm.

Cover title./ Includes bibliographical references.

prepared by the U.C. Davis Clear Lake Environmental Research Center.

Conference publication (cnp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 288

Year: 1998

Title: Clear Lake dam modification : safety of dams program : draft environmental assessment

Place Published: Klamath Falls, Or.

Publisher: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region

Number of Pages: 35 p.

Short Title: Clear Lake dam modification : safety of dams program : draft environmental assessment

Accession Number: OCLC: 181597321 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC I 29.79/5:C 58x Shields UCD gov info stacks

Keywords: Dams -- Modification -- California -- Clear Lake (Modoc County : Reservoir)

Dam safety -- California -- California -- Clear Lake (Modoc County : Reservoir)

Clear Lake (Modoc County, Calif. : Reservoir)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: This document refers to Clear Lake in Modoc County, not in Lake County

clear lake; dam

United States.; Bureau of Reclamation.; Mid-Pacific Regional Office.

ill., maps ; 28 cm.

"December 2, 1998"--Cover./ Includes bibliographical references (p. 34-35).

Clear Lake safety of dams draft EA

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 557

Year: 1998

Title: Clear Lake Electrofishing Data 1998

Secondary Author: C. D. o. F. a. Game

Place Published: North Central Regional Office

Date: November 2-3, 1998

Subsidiary Author: C. D. o. F. a. Game

Short Title: Clear Lake Electrofishing Data 1998

Reviewed Item: Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Abstract: 1998 Electroshock data listing 17 species recorded and length (mm). Sample sites, Dates, Time, and Water Temperature are listed.

Research Notes: Electroshock data photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

 

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 287

Year: 1998

Title: Value engineering, final report, Clear Lake Dam modifications

Place Published: Denver, Colo.

Publisher: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation

Number of Pages: 24 p.

Short Title: Value engineering, final report, Clear Lake Dam modifications

Accession Number: OCLC: 43361706 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - US BUR OF RECLAMATION, DENVER OFF LIBR

 

LC: TS168.4.V215

Keywords: Value analysis (Cost control)

Dams -- Modification -- California -- Lost River.

Clear Lake Dam (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement; dam

Tule Lake Basin Reclamation Project (U.S.) ; United States.; Bureau of Reclamation.

ill., maps, plans ; 28 cm.

Cover title./ "(A50-1360-0001-002-25-0-J (8) and CJCAC)."/ "December 15, 1998."/ "Conducted for Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region."

Clear Lake Dam modifications

Bureau of Reclamation.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 290

Year: 1999

Title: Clear Lake Basin watershed analysis

Place Published: Lakeport, CA

Publisher: County of Lake Public Works Dept.

Number of Volumes: 1

Number of Pages: (various pagings)

Short Title: Clear Lake Basin watershed analysis

Accession Number: OCLC: 42399841 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - DOC-STA CA/LAK P8 C53 Shields UCD gov info stacks

Keywords: Water quality -- California -- Clear Lake Watershed (Lake County)

Watershed management -- California -- Clear Lake Watershed (Lake County)

Clear Lake Watershed (Lake County, Calif.) -- Environmental conditions.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; tributary

Lake County (Calif.).; Dept. of Public Works.; Water Resources Division. ; California.; State Water Resources Control Board.

ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 28 cm.

"Submitted to State Water Resources Control Board"--Added t.p./ "May 1999."/ Includes bibliographical references.

Final project report, 205(j) contract #5-157-250-0, Lake County water quality grant; Lake County water quality (205) grant

Lake County Water Resources Division.

Government publication (gpb); Local government publication (lgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 289

Year: 1999

Title: Implement Riparian Protection, Project Monitoring and Monitoring Information Management in the Lost River/Clear Lake Watershed

Short Title: Implement Riparian Protection, Project Monitoring and Monitoring Information Management in the Lost River/Clear Lake Watershed

Accession Number: PB2001102826

Call Number:call # - DOC I 49.2:L 89/4 mf11 Shields UCD microcopy collection

Keywords: Watersheds; Monitoring; Livestock; Fencing; Information management;

Project monitoring; Improvement; Restoration; California; Grazing;

Data collection

Riparian protection; Lost River; Clear Lake; Forest Service;

Streamside habitats

48B Natural Resources & Earth Sciences: Natural Resource

Management; 57H Medicine & Biology: Ecology

Abstract: In September of 1998, the United States Forest Service, Modoc National Forest, and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Yreka Fish and Wildlife Office, entered into an interagency agreement to implement and administer watershed improvement and restoration within the Lost River/Clear Lake watershed of northern California. Fifteen thousand dollars of funding for this project was provided by a 319(h) grant awarded through the North Coast Water Quality Control Board of the State of California. The program agreement recognizes that livestock grazing is a major resource use impacting watershed conditions and that proper grazing practices are key to watershed maintenance, improvement and restoration. Therefore, a project designed to facilitate proper use of key streamside habitats by livestock was implemented through the agreement. The project specifically provides for the construction of approximately 10 miles of riparian fencing to control timing, intensity, and duration of cattle grazing along Lost River and Rock Creek within the Clear Lake grazing allotment of the Modoc National Forest.

Notes: This document refers to Clear Lake in Modoc County, not in Lake County; tributary

Performer: Fish and Wildlife Service, Yreka, CA. Klamath Fisheries Restoration Program.; Modoc National Forest, Alturas, CA. 1999. 42p.

Prepared in cooperation with Modoc National Forest, Alturas, CA.

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 558

Year: 2000

Title: Clear Lake Electrofishing Data 2000

Secondary Author: C. D. o. F. a. Game

Place Published: North Central Regional Office

Date: October 17-18, 2000

Subsidiary Author: C. D. o. F. a. Game

Short Title: Clear Lake Electrofishing Data 2000

Reviewed Item: Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Abstract: 2000 Electroshock data listing 17 species length (mm) and weight (g) recorded. Sample sites, Dates, Time, and Water Temperature are listed.

 

Research Notes: Electroshock data photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 291

Year: 2004

Title: Stabilization of Mercury in Waste Material from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine. Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

Short Title: Stabilization of Mercury in Waste Material from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine. Innovative Technology Evaluation Report

Accession Number: PB2005109276

Keywords: Mercury; Mining wastes; Leaching; Water pollution monitoring; Water

samples; Contaminants; Toxicity; Analytical methods; Analytical

procedures; Filtration; Waste materials; Immobilization; Mine

tailings

Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine; Stabilization technologies; Lake

County(California)

68D Environmental Pollution & Control: Water Pollution &

Control; 57Y Medicine & Biology: Toxicology; 48A Natural Resources

& Earth Sciences: Mineral Industries

Abstract: This report summarizes the findings of an extensive treatability study of three stabilization technologies for mercury immobilization on materials collected from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM), located north of San Francisco, in Lake County, California. The SBMM site is believed to be contaminating the adjacent Clear Lake environment with mercury derived from historic mining practices at the site. The study was conducted as a joint effort between EPA’s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program and the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP). Two mercury contaminated materials were selected for treatment by three types of stabilization technologies.

 

The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the three stabilization technologies for immobilizing mercury in the waste rock materials and therefore reducing leachable mobile mercury in the effluent. Several mercury-bearing materials from the site were considered for testing. A material with high levels of leachable mercury was selected as the primary target of the study, and is referred to as “Mercury Ore”. As a secondary objective, treatment effectiveness was evaluated on material that was lower in mercury concentration, but present in large quantities and is referred to as “Waste Rock”.

 

Three stabilization technologies were evaluated as part of this study: (1) a Silica Micro Encapsulation (SME) process developed by Klean Earth Environmental Company (KEECO), (2) an inorganic sulfide stabilization technology (ENTHRALL®) developed by E&C Williams, and (3) a generic phosphate treatment.

 

The primary objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the three stabilization technologies (silica encapsulation, phosphate, and sulfide) in reducing the quantity of leachable mercury from SBMM material. Waste material evaluated in this study consisted of “mercury ore” from the south white gate pile and “waste rock” from the north yellow pile. The mercury ore was the primary test material due to its demonstrated ability to produce consistent and detectable levels of leachable mercury. The waste rock was included because it is a common material at the site, even though it yields lower levels of leachable mercury. In order to evaluate the performance of the three technologies, the leachable and mobile mercury (defined as the mercury in the <25μ filtered leachate fraction) from control columns receiving no treatment was compared to the leachable and mobile mercury in the treatment columns. Specifically, the objective was to achieve a 90% reduction in the total mass of mercury leached from each treatment relative to the control over a 12-week continuous column leaching study.

 

Leachability results from the no treatment control columns revealed that the predominant source of leachable mercury was found in the particulate fraction, i.e. approximately 96%. The phosphate treatment dramatically increased the levels of both the particulate and dissolved fractions (<0.45μm) over the course of the 12-week study. The dramatic rise in leachable mercury brought about by the phosphate treatment invalidates its utility as a remedial alternative for materials at the SBMM site. The E&C William’s ENTHRALL® Technology did not appear to be effective in reducing the levels of mobile mercury in the mercury ore column tests. The total mass of mercury in both the particulate and dissolved fractions are statistically similar to the control. KEECO’s Silica Micro Encapsulation Technology applied both in situ and ex situ, was effective in reducing mobile mercury (<25 μm) very close to the 90% reduction goal of the study. However, there was a significant increase in the mass mercury levels in the dissolved fraction (<0.45μm). The in situ applications exhibited a 198% increase relative to the control, and the ex situ exhibited a 238% increase.

Notes: mine; pollution; ONLINE

Performer: Science Applications International Corp., Cincinnati, OH. Sponsor: National Risk Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH. Office of Research and Development. Jul 2004. 72p. Report: EPA/540/R04/502A

Sponsored by National Risk Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH. Office of Research and Development.

Contracts EPA-68-C5-0036 , EPA-58-COO-179

URL: http://firstsearch.oclc.org/WebZ/FSPage?pagetype=return_frameset:sessionid=fsapp1-49132-fiqi43q9-8mdyae:entitypagenum=37:0:entityframedurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.epa.gov%2FORD%2FNRMRL%2Fpubs%2F540r04502%2F540r04502.htm:entityframedtitle=WorldCat:entityframedtimeout=5:entityopenTitle=:entityopenAuthor=:entityopenNumber=:

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 293

Year: 2005

Title: Bass fishing slows on Clear Lake

Newspaper: Lake County Record Bee (Lakeport, CA)

Short Title: Bass fishing slows on Clear Lake

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; html online via newsbank

Provider: NewsBank, SQN: 2793247

Research Notes: fish

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 292

Year: 2005

Title: Health advisory : fish consumption guidelines for Clear Lake, Cache Creek, and Bear Creek (Lake, Yolo, and Colusa Counties)

Place Published: [Sacramento, CA]

Publisher: Pesticide and Environmental Toxicology Branch, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency

Number of Pages: 66 p.

Short Title: Health advisory : fish consumption guidelines for Clear Lake, Cache Creek, and Bear Creek (Lake, Yolo, and Colusa Counties)

Accession Number: OCLC: 173382103 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - CAL EP 1.2:H 34/5 San Diego Public Library  Reference Government Pub Storage 

Keywords: Water pollution -- California -- Lake County.

Water pollution -- California -- Yolo County.

Water pollution -- California -- Colusa County.

Fishes -- Effect of water pollution on -- California -- Lake County.

Fishes -- Effect of water pollution on -- California -- Yolo County.

Fishes -- Effect of water pollutin on -- California -- Yolo County.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; pollution

California Environmental Protection Agency.; Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment.

col. ill. ; 28 cm.

Title from cover./ "January 2005."/ Includes bibliographical references./ Also available on the Internet.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

URL: Host: http://www.oehha.ca.gov/fish/so_cal/pdf_zip/ClearLake0105.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 192

Year: 2007

Title: Efforts of environmentalists have paid off in health of Clear Lake

Newspaper: Clear Lake Observer-American (CA)

Short Title: Efforts of environmentalists have paid off in health of Clear Lake

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; ONLINE

Provider: NewsBank, SQN: 6560947

URL: http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/InfoWeb?p_product=AWNB&p_theme=aggregated5&p_action=doc&p_docid=11AE5DEF701BE330&p_docnum=1&p_queryname=1

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 514

Year: 2008

Title: Dedication

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: A2-A2

Short Title: Dedication

DOI: doi:10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.A2

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.A2

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 552

Year: 2008

Title: List of Plates

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: ii-ii

Short Title: List of Plates

DOI: doi:10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.ii

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.ii

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 550

Year: 2008

Title: PLATE 10

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: A297-A297

Short Title: PLATE 10

DOI: doi:10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.A297

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.A297

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 526

Year: 2008

Title: PLATES 1 and 2

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: A88-A88

Short Title: PLATES 1 and 2

DOI: doi:10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.A88

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/1051-0761-18.sp8.A88

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 193

Year: 2008

Title: Setting the record straight on plight of hitch

Newspaper: Clear Lake Observer-American (CA)

Short Title: Setting the record straight on plight of hitch

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: hitch; ONLINE

Provider: NewsBank, SQN: 8608890

URL: http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/InfoWeb?p_product=AWNB&p_theme=aggregated5&p_action=doc&p_docid=11F7E1F083404A68&p_docnum=1&p_queryname=3

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 295

Author: M. E. Aceituno and S. J. Nicola

Year: 1976

Title: Distribution and Status of the Sacramento Perch Archoplites-Interruptus in California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 62

Issue: 4

Pages: 246-254

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Distribution and Status of the Sacramento Perch Archoplites-Interruptus in California

ISSN: 0008-1078

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV197763007420

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: California's only native centrarchid is virtually nonexistent in its native habitat: the waters of the Central Valley, the Clear Lake basin, and Pajaro and Salinas rivers. It has been introduced and successfully established in a number of artificial environments and natural waters outside its native range; it is in no danger of becoming extinct. The history of its decline and transplanting is traced.

Notes: fish

 

-sacramento perch is native to central valley, clear lake basin, pajaro, Salinas rivers (not present here)

-successfully established in non native areas, no danger of extinction

-only native sunfish west of the rockies

-pg 248

            -first collected in 1895

            -late 1800’s, population in high numbers

            -1931, commercial fishing prohibited

-pg 249

            -1900, now uncommon and population declining

            -1940, scarce

            -not major sport fish

            -native to clear lake

            -1941, begin to plant fish in ponds and reservoirs

            -1955, present in brickyard pond, Washington lake, artificial lakes and ponds, possible sacramento-san Joaquin delta and Russian river and clear lake (rather than clear lake basin)

-pg 250

            -1973, clear lake population able to maintain

            -decline due to predation, habitat alteration, competition (food and space, fishing, decrease in water clarity, exotic introductions)

            -sight feed predators

-pg 252

            -bluegill responsible for clear lake decline (Moyle)

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV197763007420

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 296

Author: D. P. Adam

Year: 1988

Title: Pollen Zonation and Proposed Informal Climatic Units for Clear Lake, California, Cores CL-73-4 and CL-73-7

Short Title: Pollen Zonation and Proposed Informal Climatic Units for Clear Lake, California, Cores CL-73-4 and CL-73-7

Accession Number: 8910142

Keywords: Lake basins; Tectonics; Palynology; Cores; Paleoclimatology;

Paleolimnology; California; Lake sediments; Glaciation; Geothermal

studies; Geologic history; Paleohydrology; Paleolimnology;

Stratigraphy; Sedimentology; Quaternary Period; Cenozoic Era; Holocene

Epoch; Pleistocene Epoch; Dating; Correlation analysis; Bioindicators;

Pollen; Oak trees; Pine trees; Vegetation; Zoning

SW 0870 Erosion and sedimentation; SW 0850 Lakes

Abstract: Clear Lake occupies a structural depression in the northern California Coast Ranges at an elevation of 404 meters. Eight sediment cores were taken from the lake in 1973 and the palynology of cores CL-73-4 and CL-73-7 are reported. The former is 115 meters long, and is interpreted to cover the entire last glacial cycle; the latter is 27.5 meters long and covers at least the last 40,000 radiocarbon years. The pollen records of both cores are dominated by three pollen types (oak, pine, and TCT (Taxodiaceae, Cupressaceae, and Taxaceae) that together account for between 75 and 99 percent of the pollen in each sample. The present pollen rain around Clear Lake is dominated by oak pollen. During the cooler parts of the last glacial cycle , oak pollen influx to the sediments of Clear Lake was largely or entirely replaced by coniferous pollen (mostly pine and TCT) in response to vertical migration of vegetation belts caused by climatic changes. Pollen data were reduced using a Q-mode factor analysis. Five factors were defined that account for more than 98 percent of the variance. Zoning of the pollen diagrams was accomplished using an iterative program. The 21 pollen zones of core CL-73-4 are used to propose a series of informal climatic units that include the time interval from the penultimate glaciation to the present. The major units proposed, from oldest to youngest, are: (1) Tsabal cryomer, (2) Konocti thermomer, (3) Pomo cryomer, and (4) Tuleyome thermomer (Holocene). The record in the sediments of algae with acid-resistant remains indicates that lake productivity was relatively high during warm intervals in the past, and that overall productivity increased as the lake became shallower and its thermal inertia decreased. The lake waters were probably transparent during the cooler parts of the last glacial cycle, but Clear Lake has probably not been as clear a lake during the Holocene. (See also W89-10137) (Author 's abstract)

Notes: Late Quaternary Climate, Tectonism, Sedimentation in Clear Lake, Northern California Coasts. Geological Society of America, Boulder CO. 1988. p 63-80, 2 fig, 4 tab, 26 ref, 1 append.

Author Address: Geological Survey Menlo Park, CA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 297

Author: D. P. Adam, J. D. Sims and C. K. Throckmorton

Year: 1981

Title: 130,000-Yr Continuous Pollen Record from Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Journal: Geology

Volume: 9

Issue: 8

Pages: 373-377

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: 130,000-Yr Continuous Pollen Record from Clear Lake, Lake County, California

ISSN: 0091-7613

Accession Number: ISI:A1981LY09600012

Abstract: Pollen analysis of a 115-m sediment core from Clear Lake, Lake County, California, provides a climatic record that is continuous for the past 130,000 yr. The pollen record reflects migrations of the tree species of the California Coast Ranges in response to the climatic changes of the last glacial cycle. During interglacials, the Clear Lake pollen rain was dominated by Quercus (oak) pollen. During cooler periods, oak pollen was replaced by pollen of coniferous species. The curve for Quercus pollen strongly resembles and is used to correlate with both deep-sea oxygen-isotope curves and the climatic record from certain European pollen studies.

Notes: climate; ONLINE

 

-           Pg 373

- Interglacials-quercus dominated

- Cooler periods-coniferous species dominated

- Dominated by quercus, pinus, TCT (taxodiaceae, cupressaceae, taxaceae)

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1981LY09600012

http://www.gsajournals.org/archive/0091-7613/9/8/pdf/i0091-7613-9-8-373.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 493

Author: D. P. G. J. W. Adam

Year: 1983

Title: Temperature and Precipitation Estimates through the Last Glacial Cycle from Clear Lake, California, Pollen Data

Journal: American Association for the Advancement of Science

Volume: 219

Issue: No. 4581

Pages: 168-170

Start Page: 168

Date: Jan. 14, 1983

Short Title: Temperature and Precipitation Estimates through the Last Glacial Cycle from Clear Lake, California, Pollen Data

Abstract: Modern pollen surface samples from six lake and marsh sites in the northern California Coast Ranges establish a linear relation between elevation and the oakl(oak + pine) pollen ratio. Modern temperature and precipitation lapse rates were used to convert variations in the pollen ratio into temperature and precipitation changes. Pollen data from two cores from Clear Lake, Lake County, California, spanning the past 40,000 and 130,000 years were used to estimate temperature and precipitation changes through the last full glacial cycle. The maximum glacial cooling is estimated to be 7 to 8C; the last full interglacial period was about 1.5C warmer than the Holocene, and a mid-Holocene interval was warmer than the present. The estimated precipitation changes are probably less reliable than the estimated temperature changes.

Notes: climate; botany

 

-           Pg 169

- During full glacial conditions

    - Max temperature decrease of 7-8C

    - Little oak at this time

    - Figure 2-temperature and precipitation changes since 128,000BP

- Last interglacial (5e) `1-1.5C warmer than Holocene and probably drier

- Early wisconsonian (5a0d) 2-4C cooler than Holocene(~8,000BP-present)

-           Pg 170

- Water temperature warmer during mid Holocene based on tule perch scales

- “summer droughts persisted in the north coast ranges throughout last glacial cycle” due to increase in spruce pollen

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 494

Author: D. P. S. W. R. Adam

Year: 1988

Title: Palynology of Two Upper Quaternary Cores from Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1363, 86 p., 24 text-figs., 7 pls., 5 fossil pls., 16 tbls. Includes a chapter on dating (p. 41-49) by S. W. Robinson.

Short Title: Palynology of Two Upper Quaternary Cores from Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: botany

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 542

Author: D. W. Anderson, T. H. Suchanek, C. A. Eagles-Smith and T. M. Cahill

Year: 2008

Title: MERCURY RESIDUES AND PRODUCTIVITY IN OSPREY AND GREBES FROM A MINE-DOMINATED ECOSYSTEM

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: A227-A238

Short Title: MERCURY RESIDUES AND PRODUCTIVITY IN OSPREY AND GREBES FROM A MINE-DOMINATED ECOSYSTEM

DOI: doi:10.1890/06-1837.1

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/06-1837.1

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 298

Author: C. S. Apperson, R. Elston and W. Castle

Year: 1976

Title: Biological Effects and Persistence of Methyl Parathion in Clear Lake, California

Journal: Environmental Entomology

Volume: 5

Issue: 6

Pages: 1116-1120

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Biological Effects and Persistence of Methyl Parathion in Clear Lake, California

ISSN: 0046-225X

Accession Number: ISI:A1976CP54400019

Call Number: call # - QL461 .E76 Shields UCD

Abstract: Methyl parathion was applied to Clear Lake at a rate of 3.3 ppb for control of Chaoborus astictopus Dyar & Shannon. Three treatments at 20-day intervals had no lasting impact on zooplankton. Recovery to near or above pretreatment numbers was rapid for the organisms examined., including copepod nauplii, Diaptomus franciscanus Lilljeborg, Cyclops sp., Mesocyclops spp., Daphnia spp., Bosmina longirostris (O.F. Muller), Diaphanosoma brachyurum (Lieven) and Ceriodaphnia reticulate (Jurine).

 

No residues were detected in lake sediments. Highest residues in water were found 8 and 24 hr after the treatments, varying from 0.5-5.4 ppb, and generally declining after each treatment. However, generally larger residues were found with each successive treatment. Residues in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus Rafinesque, exposed to the treatments in live cars, varied from 11-110 ppb. A significant correlation was found between the methyl parathion levels in fish and water collected simultaneously.

Notes: clear lake; chemistry

 

-pg 1116

            -no lasting impact on zooplankton

            -no residue in sediment

            -high residue in bluegill

            -methyl parathion applied annually since 1962. three to four times per summer (3.3 ppb)

-pg 1117

            -recovery of pretreatment insect levels not uncommon

-pg 1118

            -no residues in sediment therefore methyl parathion degrades rapidly

-pg 1119

            -fish residues (11-110 ppb)

-pg 1120

            -decrease in water methyl parathion and animal methyl parathion

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1976CP54400019

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 299

Author: C. E. Asher

Year: 2003

Title: Sulfate reduction in the sediments of Clear Lake, California

Number of Pages: 129 leaves

Date: 2003

Thesis Type: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 20040622

Short Title: Sulfate reduction in the sediments of Clear Lake, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 55693695 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 2003 A834 Shields UCD

Abstract: The environmental impacts of mercury (Hg) contamination from gold, silver and mercury mining in the western United States is actively being researched by a diverse consortium of scientists including the UC Davis (UCD) mercury group and the California Bay Delta Authority. Previously the atmospheric deposition of Hg, primarily from power generating industries, had been the focus of studies on the environmental impacts and distribution of Hg. However, in the western region of the United States, the signal from atmospheric deposition of Hg is frequently overwhelmed by Hg contamination from mining activities. The California Coast Range in general, and in particular the Clear Lake and Cache Creek watersheds (Fig. 1), are major sources of Hg contamination. The Coast Range of California contains over 300 previously active mines that were responsible for nearly ninety percent of the Hg produced in the United States between 1850-1980 (Suchanek et a/., 1997). Among the most productive were mines in the Clear Lake and Cache Creek watersheds. The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM), located on the banks of Clear Lake, CA, produced ca. 5,000 tons of Hg, and mines in the Cache Creek watershed produced ca. 7,600 tons equaling more than twelve percent of all California production (Slotton, 1995). Further exacerbating Hg contamination within California" and contributing to an ongoing problem, was the transportation from the Coast Range to the Sierra Nevada Mountains of Hg that was used in gold and silver mining operations. Some of the original Hg mined in the Coast Range continues to contaminate Clear Lake and Cache Creek and to be transported downstream to the San Francisco Bay-Delta where it is reunited with Hg that was transported to the Sierras.

Notes: soil, chemistry

ill. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Davis, 2003.

Degree granted in Microbiology.

by Chance E. Asher.

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss)

 

-pg 1

            -clear lake watershed, major source of mercury contamination

            -sulphur bank mercury mine produced 5,000 tons of mercury (slotten 1995)

-pg 3

            -clear lake drainage from mostly Kelsey, adobe, middle, and scotts creek

            -drained by cache creek

            -one of most mercury contaminated lakes in the world

            -1872-1957 sulphur bank mercury mine under operation

            -1990, Sulphur bank mercury mine becomes and environmental protection agency (epa) superfund site after discovery of elevated mercury levels in fish (channel catfish and largemouth bass)

            -1980’s, health advisories set

            -increased mercury poses a risk to wildlife (birds)

-pg 4

            -1865, begin mining for Sulphur

            -1872-1897, 1899-1902, 1915-1918, 1927-1947, 1955-1957, mining for mercury (chamberlain 1990 et al, Suchanek 2000)

            -sulphur bank mercury mine produced between 4,400-7,000 metric tons of mercury (chamberlain et al 1990, Suchanek 1998 et al)

            -about 100 metric tons of mercury in clear lake

            -lakebed sediment 450 ppm (mg/kg) to <1.0 ppm (Suchanek et al 1997, Suchanek et al 1998)

            -open pit mine separated by earthen dam (made of deposited waste rock and overburden)

            -pH=3

-pg 5

            -core profile measurements shoe increase of methyl mercury in sediments at time of mining (richerson et al 2000)

-pg 7

            -ware draining from clear lake is five fold higher in methyl mercury than the water coming into the lake (Suchanek 1997)

            -concentration of mercury decreases as you move from Sulphur bank mercury mine

-pg 8

            -abandoned pits and mines fill with water and overflow into the clear lake

-pg 22

            -acid mine drainage environmental impacts:

                        -decrease ecological diversity, habitat elimination, niche reduction, substrate modification, toxicity of sediments, bioaccumulation

-pg 84

            -table I, pH, total mercury, sulfate (at clear lake, near Sulphur bank mercury mine, at Sulphur bank mercury mine)

-pg 85

            -table J, precipitation, 1998-2001

-pg 91

            -figure 6, major effects of acid mine drainage on a system

-pg 92

            -figure 7, decreased pH effects on a system

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 300

Author: P. K. Bairrington

Year: 1995

Title: Clear Lake fishery management plan - Preliminary Report

Place Published: Yountville, CA

Publisher: State of California, Resources Agency, California Dept. of Fish and Game, Fisheries Programs Branch [Central Coast Region

Short Title: Clear Lake fishery management plan - Preliminary Report

Keywords: Fishery management -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: Introduction

Often called the "bass capital of the West," Clear Lake, Lake County supports one of the best warmwater fisheries in California. The record angler caught largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides is 17.52 pounds and was caught February 1990. The catch broke the seven-week record-sized fish of 15.32 pounds. In 1969, Clear Lake supported 340,000 angler-days of effort and produced a gamefish yield of 34.7 Kg/ha (31 lb/acre) (Puckett 1972); one can only surmise that, with the dramatic population increase since 1969 in nearby urban areas, the lake has seen a likewise increase in the number of angler days of effort. Proper management is crucial in the face of this kind of pressure in order to maintain and enhance the Clear Lake fishery.

Notes: settlement; fish; clear lake

California.; Fisheries Programs Branch.; Central Coast Region.

28 cm.

Cover title./ "January 1999."/ Includes bibliographical references (p. 76-80).

by Philip K. Bairrington.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

-pg 4

            -average depth is 21.3 feet, deepest is 59 feet

-pg 5

            -1840, European settlers arrive

                        -clear land for farming

                        -nutrient level of lake increases

            -1920’s, tule lake and robinson lake drained and converted to agriculture

            -1976, Anderson marsh temporarily converted to agriculture

-pg 6

            -october to april is rainy season

            -shallow soil mantle (0-6 inches) therefore little water retention in watershed

-pg 8

            -major tributaries, Kelsey, adobe, highlands, seigler canyon, manning, burns valley, clover, scotts (23.4% of run off), middle (29.8% of run off) creeks

            -cache creek once met with the sacramento river

- pg 9

            -seigler contributes concentrations of boron to clear lake

            -surface temperature, winter (48 F), summer (80 F)

-pg 10

            -map with sulphur bank mercury mine

-pg 12

            -31 species in clear lake

                        -inland silverside, threadfin shad, pumpkinseed not authorized by the department of fish and game (dfg)

-pg 13

                                    -table

-pg 14

                        -chub, splittail, stickleback, rainbow and brown trout gone

            -1930’s-1940’s, catfish are 80% of the catch

            -1950’s, 80% centrarchids except perch

-pg 15

            -table 2, composition of fish caught in 1994 and 1995

-pg 16

            -cache creek dam managed by YCFCWCD

-pg 17

            -fishing regulations

-pg 18

            -1895, 13 native and 4 introduced

            -1950, 12 native and 8 introduced

            -1964, 12 native and 12 introduced (table on pg 19)

-pg 20

            -1988-1989, shad population boom, food for bass

                        -1993-1995, no shad found

            -yearly plantings of fingerling bass, crappie and catfish

-pg 21

            -black crappie introduced (1985)

-pg 24

            -about 300 catfish spawning in structures in the lake

-pg 29

            -1988, shad abundant but by 1991 they die off

-pg 30

            -with crash of shad, bigger bass fed on juvenile bass and catfish

            -silversides increase which means more food for bass

-pg 33

            -since European settlers, 85% of riparian habitat has been lost

-pg 39

            -1987 (RWQCB), five miles squared in oaks arm has sediment levels over 20 ppm mercury. Other arms are lower but still higher than other lakes

            -1988, environmental protection agency (epa) put clear lake on its superfund list

-pg 40

            -1990, reported that Sulphur bank mercury mine dumps 242-330 pounds of toxic metal into clear lake per year

-pg 41

            -crappie decline information

-pg 45

            -clearer water means more vegetation

            -1994, hydrilla found in clear lake

-pg 46-51

            -action plan

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 301

Author: P. K. Bairrington

Year: 1999

Title: Clear Lake fishery management plan

Place Published: Yountville, CA

Publisher: State of California, Resources Agency, California Dept. of Fish and Game, Fisheries Programs Branch [Central Coast Region

Number of Pages: iii, 88 p.

Short Title: Clear Lake fishery management plan

Accession Number: OCLC: 56823925 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 338.3727 BAIRRINGTON Lakeport Lib, Upper Lake Lib, Redbud Lib, Middletown Lib

 

Dewey: 338.3727

Keywords: Fishery management -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: This document presents information on the management of fisheries at Clear Lake. A review of the past and present biological and social information develop the environmental setting and enable logical fishery management recommendations to be made. The fisheries action plan utilizes background information to suggest ways to implement and evaluate management recommendations with quantifiable milestones. Where more information is needed before recommendations can be made, the action plan identifies areas that need more attention and suggests a design for assessing the situation. The fisheries management plan is an evolving document that reflects upon the past, illuminates current issues, and focuses strategies for the future. This management plan was developed to meet the goals and objectives of the California Department of Fish and Game, fishery managers, and the desires of the angling public.

Notes: fish; clear lake

California.; Fisheries Programs Branch.; Central Coast Region.

28 cm.

Cover title./ "January 1999."/ Includes bibliographical references (p. 76-80).

by Philip K. Bairrington.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

-pg 1

            -elevation 402 meters

            -100 miles north of san Francisco

            -80 miles northwest of sacramento

-pg 3

            - 18 miles long, 8 miles wide at widest

            -1.1 million acre-feet of water at gross storage capacity

            -cache creek dam built in 1915

            -43,663 surface acres

            -average 21.3 feet deep, deepest is 59 feet

            -71 miles of shore

            -1840, Europeans, etc (see Bairrington 1995)

-pg 5

            -climate, precipitation, 24-65 inches per year

            -clear lake is highly eutrophic and polymitic

-pg 11

            -shad extirpated in 1990, illegal reintroduced in 1997

            -1999, some sacramento perch being caught

            -22 nongame species (7 introduced)

-pg 14

            -1999, hardhead and splittail extirpated

            -1941, catfish fishing banned

            -1932-1962, 295,000 pounds per year

            -1991, no bait fish harvesters (live bait) on clear lake since then (hitch, silverside, shad)

            -collect with beach seines (dead bait)

-pg 16

            -management at clear lake

                        -cache creek dam (YCFCWCD), downstream irrigation

                        -lake county flood control and water conservation district

                        -county and city planning department

                        -fish and wildlife advisory committee

                        -lake county vector control

                        -algae abatement committee

                        -lakebed management department

                        -LCCRMC, etc

            -game fish stocking

-pg 17

            -1991, channel catfish using spawning structures

-pg 19

            -1998 clear lake fish:

                        -native-pacific lamprey, rainbow trout, sacramento sucker, blackfish, hitch, Pikeminnow, splittail, chub, tule perch, California roach, prickly sculpin, three spined stickleback

                        -introduced-carp, goldfish, brown bullhead, channel catfish, white catfish, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, green sunfish, black crappie, white crappie, golden shiner, mosquitofish, silverside, shad

-pg 22-23

            -stocking numbers of largemouth bass, channel catfish, and black crappie

-pg 29

            -table, beach seines via vector control (1998)

-pg 31

            -1991, shad die off due to freezing

            -1998, vector control beach seines (no shad)

            -late 1980's, few juvenile bass

-pg 39

            -1991, boom for juvenile fish. Silversides increase

-pg 45

            -1993, placement of spawning gravel at Anderson marsh and clear lake state park

            -october to December 1993, transplanting tules to shore between nice and Lucerne

-pg 87-88

            -creel survey

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 559

Author: P. H. Baker

Title: Clear Lake Largemouth Bass Program

Place Published: Yountville, California

Publisher: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Clear Lake Largemouth Bass Program

Abstract: 1.2 million recreation days per year, with 343,000 angler days. Historically sport fishery composed of Sacramento perch and rainbow trout. Late thirties and early forties ictalurids provided 70% of catch. Shift towards centrarchids and Largemouth bass during the 1950s. Paper worked to provided suggestions to improve the bass fishery.

Research Notes: photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

 

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 302

Author: K. M. Batten and K. M. Scow

Year: 2003

Title: Sediment microbial community composition and methylmercury pollution at four mercury mine-impacted sites

Journal: Microbial Ecology

Volume: 46

Issue: 4

Pages: 429-441

Date: Nov

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Sediment microbial community composition and methylmercury pollution at four mercury mine-impacted sites

ISSN: 0095-3628

Accession Number: ISI:000187875800005

Keywords: SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA; PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY-ACID; ESTUARINE SEDIMENT;

LAKE-SEDIMENTS; CLEAR LAKE; METHYLATION; SULFIDE; BIOAVAILABILITY;

DEMETHYLATION; CALIFORNIA

Abstract: Mercury pollution presents a globally significant threat to human and ecosystem health. An important transformation in the mercury cycle is the conversion of inorganic mercury to methylmercury, a toxic substance that negatively affects neurological function and bioaccumulates in food chains. This transformation is primarily bacterially mediated, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been specifically implicated as key mercury methylators in lake and estuarine sediments. This study used phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis to investigate sediment microbial community composition at four abandoned mercury mine-impacted sites in the California Coast Range: the Abbott, Reed, Sulphur Bank, and Mt. Diablo mines. Differences in watershed and hydrology among these sites were related to differences in microbial community composition. The Abbott and Sulphur Bank mines had the highest levels of methylmercury. Floc (a type of precipitate that forms when acid mine drainage contacts lake or river water) and sediment samples differed in terms of several important environmental variables and microbial community composition, but did not have statistically different methylmercury concentrations. Quantification of PLFA biomarkers for SRB (10Mel6:0 for Desulfobacter and i17:1 for Desulfovibrio) revealed that Desulfobacter and Desulfovibrio organisms made up higher percentages of overall microbial biomass at the Sulphur Bank and Mt. Diablo mines than at the Abbott and Reed mines. Correlations between these SRB biomarker fatty acids and methylmercury concentrations suggest that Desulfobacter and Desulfovibrio organisms may contribute to methylmercury production in the Abbott, Reed, and Sulphur Bank mines but may not be important contributors to methylmercury in the Mt. Diablo Mine.

Notes: mine; chemistry; soil; ONLINE

 

-           Pg 430

- MeHg - toxic to microorganisms, negative impact on growth, reproduction and survival

URL: <Go to ISI>://000187875800005

http://www.springerlink.com/content/ahwq84fqmyhfxn09/fulltext.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 303

Reporter: H. W. a. H. M. Benson

Year: 1974

Title: When spawning fish died by millions

Newspaper: Pomo Bulletin

Place Published: Lake County

Pages: 8298-8300

Short Title: When spawning fish died by millions

Call Number: call # - University of Wisconsin-Madison

Notes: fish

In Mauldin’s History of Lake County, Lake County Museum

 

-pg 9

            -tributaries overcrowding at times

            -kelsey creek ideal for spawning

            -tribes set up camps during runs

                        -clubs, bare hands, spears, drag/dip nets, soap root/dove mullen to stupefy

-pg 10

            -hitch was greater proportion of catch along with high numbers of chi and chub (sacramento tui chub)

                        -great numbers of Pikeminnow (chapaul)

                        -some western sucker and western roach

            -1974, observations of fish kills due to drying creeks

                        -lange brothers gravel plant on Kelsey creek

                                    -dead fish over five feet deep

            -large runs no more

-pg 12

            -1925, at the lake at clear lake oaks

                        -streams and tule swamps filled side to side with fish. Could walk upon them

            -carp raising

                        -1878, large carp ponds in cob mountain, Anderson springs, boggs mill (between Glenbrook and Kelseyville)

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 499

Author: D. J. Blunt, K. A. Kvenvolden and J. D. Sims

Year: 1981

Title: Geochemistry of Amino-Acids in Sediments from Clear Lake, California

Journal: Geology

Volume: 9

Issue: 8

Pages: 378-382

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Geochemistry of Amino-Acids in Sediments from Clear Lake, California

ISSN: 0091-7613

Accession Number: ISI:A1981LY09600013

Keywords: Lake sediments; Geochemistry; Amino acids; Pollen; Geologic history;

Clear Lake; California; Sampling; Sediments; Cores

SW 0880 Chemical processes

Abstract: The results of amino acid geochemistry are reported with application to deochronology in core 4 sediments of Clear Lake (California). Aspartic acid and alanine were considered in detail to clarify uncertainties in correlations of ash beds and pollen spectra in lacustrine sediment. Relative concentrations of aspartic acid decreased with depth, probably due to diagenesis and to preferential adsorption and hydrolysis in clay. Alanine increased with depth, probably because of the generation of alanine during diagenesis of other amino acids. When age assessment is based on alanine, results support a time-depth curve obtained from oak pollen and oxygen isotopes over a span of about 130,000 years. (Small-FRC)

Notes: soil; chemistry; ONLINE

Geology Vol 9, No 8, p 378-382, August, 1981. 3 Fig, 3 Tab, 21 Ref.

 

-           Pg 378

- [aspartic acid] decreases with depth, [ala] increases with depth

- northwestern-trending faults that dissect CL volcanic fields (Donnelly et al 1976, 1981, Goff et al 1976)

-           Pg 379

- Gly, Ala, Asp, Glu (most abundant amino acids)

-           Pg 380

- Asp decreases due to diagenetic processes which remove Asp over time

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1981LY09600013

http://www.gsajournals.org/archive/0091-7613/9/8/pdf/i0091-7613-9-8-378.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 305

Author: J. E. Broadway

Year: 1978

Title: Feeding ecology of the prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Place Published: [Davis

Publisher: Calif.]

Number of Pages: 27 leaves. ill. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--U. of Calif., Davis.

Short Title: Feeding ecology of the prickly sculpin (Cottus asper) in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 78893189 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1978 B758 Shields UCD micro copy and special collections

Keywords: Dissertations, Academic -- California -- Ecology.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

SPEC. COLL. HAS ARCHIVAL COPY; MICRO. ROOM HAS CIRCULATING MICROFICHE COPY (1 SHEET)./ Typescript./ Degree granted in Ecology.

Thesis/dissertation (deg)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 306

Author: J. E. Broadway and P. B. Moyle

Year: 1978

Title: Aspects of the ecology of the prickly sculpin, Cottus asper Richardson, a persistent native species in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Journal: Environ. Biol. Fish.

Volume: 3

Issue: 4

Pages: 337-343

Short Title: Aspects of the ecology of the prickly sculpin, Cottus asper Richardson, a persistent native species in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: 06320423

Keywords: feeding behaviour; endemic species; ecology; Cottus asper; USA,

California, Clear L.

competition; predation; introduced species

Freshwater

Q1 01341 General

Abstract: The biology of the prickly sculpin was investigated in Clear Lake, Lake County, California in order to determine how it has persisted in the face of introductions of numerous exotic species when most other native species have declined in abundance or have become extinct. Sculpins over 15 mm SL inhabited all types of benthic habitats in the lake, while post-larval sculpins were pelagic when the postlarvae of exotic species were absent. The feeding ecology of sculpins was distinct from the other fishes in the lake in that they fed largely on amphipods and chironomid midge larvae regardless of the time of year, time of day, or habitat. Sculpins were uncommon in the stomach of piscivorous fishes, except juvenile largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides ). It is concluded that prickly sculpin have persisted in Clear Lake in part because they are ecologically distinct from the exotic species and are not preyed upon by them to any great extent, and in part because they have managed to survive other man-related perturbations of this ecosystem.

Notes: fish; ONLINE

Journal Article

URL: http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/748501m322810708/fulltext.pdf

Author Address: Calif. Dep. Fish and Game, 4001 Wilson Way, Stockton, CA 95205, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 127

Author: C. Brown

Year: 1868

Title: Report to the Clear Lake Water Company, in relation to a canal for irrigation, and the water supply of San Francisco

Place Published: San Francisco

Publisher: Edward Bosqui & Co., Printers

Number of Pages: 26, [2] p. 22 cm.

Short Title: Report to the Clear Lake Water Company, in relation to a canal for irrigation, and the water supply of San Francisco

Accession Number: OCLC: 21622228 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - Box 567:16 or MICROFILMF858.C21 v.9:10 Bancroft UCB

Keywords: Irrigation canals and flumes.

Irrigation -- California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement

Clear Lake Water Company.

California pamphlets, v. 9, no. 10./ MICROFILM ONLY TO BE USED./ Bancroft has positive microfilm./ Master negative available (Box 567:16).

by Calvin Brown. More Records: Show record information

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 307

Author: J. K. Brown

Year: 1979

Title: Lagenidium giganteum, an aquatic fungus, as a potential biological control agent against the Clear Lake gnat Chaoborus astictopus in Lake County, California

Place Published: [Davis

Publisher: Calif.]

Number of Pages: 45 leaves. ill. Dissertation: Thesis (Ph.D.)--U. of Calif., Davis.

Short Title: Lagenidium giganteum, an aquatic fungus, as a potential biological control agent against the Clear Lake gnat Chaoborus astictopus in Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 84200761 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1979 B752 Shields UCD special collections

Keywords: Dissertations, Academic -- California -- Entomology.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: insects; clear lake

SPEC. COLL. HAS ARCHIVAL COPY./ Typescript./ Degree granted in Entomology.

Thesis/dissertation (deg)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 481

Author: V. a. D. A. Brown

Year: 1969

Title: The Pomo Indians of California and Their Neighbors

Series Editor: D. A. B. Elsasser

Place Published: Healdsburg, Ca

Publisher: Naturegraph Publishers

Number of Pages: 64

Short Title: The Pomo Indians of California and Their Neighbors

ISBN: 911010-30-0

911010-31-9

Call Number: call # - E 75 A53 v.1 c.2

Notes: native american

 

-pg 9

            -appear to be peaceful people (before whites)

            -1823, mission san Francisco Solano de Sonoma founded. Convert pomo and others

-pg 10

            -1849, stone-kelsey ranchers executed by shuk and xasis (pomo) due to bad treatment. White army attacks killing men, women and children (bloody island)

            -map-natives around clear lake include (eastern, southeastern, pomo, northern) pomo, wappo

-pg 11

            -northern pomo, around clear lake lived by shore. Ate acorns, fish, other plants. tule boats. Marshes for wild food

-pg 12

            -eastern and southeastern pomo, dense populations because of food sources. Tule boats helped gather food

-pg 16

            -soap plant as fish poison

            -manzanita berries made into drink

-pg 20

            -ducks and wild geese eaten

-pg 22

            -nets, fish traps for fishing

            -men who specialized in fishing did only this and traded for other goods

            -fish hooks, spearing, nets, weirs, seine nets, gill nets

            -fish were grilled or baked and dried or smoked for reserve food supply

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 308

Author: R. Bruer

Year: 1939

Title: [Diaries.]

Place Published: Santa Rosa

Publisher: Calif.

Number of Pages: 23 v.

Short Title: [Diaries.]

Accession Number: OCLC: 46853167 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - R 639.9 BRUER Central Library: Santa Rosa Annex Sonoma County Library

Keywords: Fishing -- California -- Sonoma County.

Fishing -- California -- Lake County.

Hunting -- California -- Sonoma County.

Hunting -- California -- Lake County.

Game wardens -- California -- Sonoma County.

Game wardens -- California -- Lake County.

Abstract: Diaries record daily work of Bruer as fish and game warden in Clear Lake area and in Sonoma County. Includes fish counts and game spotted. Years missing are 1940, 1945, 1948, 1950-1953.

Notes: fish; clear lake

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 309

Author: H. W. Brydon

Year: 1956

Title: The Clear Lake Gnat and Its Control in Clear Lake, California During 1954

Journal: Journal of Economic Entomology

Volume: 49

Issue: 2

Pages: 206-209

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: The Clear Lake Gnat and Its Control in Clear Lake, California During 1954

ISSN: 0022-0493

Accession Number: ISI:A1956WX61600017

Call Number: call # - SB599 .J6 Shields UCD

Abstract: Clear Lake, California, is one of the major recreational areas of the West Coast. The economics of Lake County, of which Clear Lake is a part, is primarily based upon the recreational attraction that is created by Clear Lake. However, Clear Lake is inhabited by a small white non- biting gnat commonly called the Clear Lake gnat (Chaoborus astictopus D. and S.). This bothersome gnat has, when its numbers become too great, created a tre- mendous adverse economic effect upon the County. Lindquist (1942, 1943, 1946, 1951), Roth (1948), and several other entomologists (Herms 1937, Deonier 1943, Walker 1949) spent several years in studying this gnat and developing a method of controlling it. As a result of this work a method of control was developed, and in Sep- tember 1949 the Lake was chemically treated with 14,000 gallons of a TDE formulation. The treatment was tre- mendously successful and Clear Lake's large resort busi- ness once more prospered.

 

For almost 2 years no larvae of the Clear Lake gnat were found in Clear Lake. In July 1951, however, they were again collected by means of a plankton net. From that date on the population steadily increased until the gnat was once more affecting the county's resort business, and a second control measure was carried out in Septem- ber 1954.

Notes: insects; clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1956WX61600017

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 310

Author: T. M. Cahill, D. W. Anderson, R. A. Elbert, B. P. Perley and D. R. Johnson

Year: 1998

Title: Elemental profiles in feather samples from a mercury-contaminated lake in central California

Journal: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

Volume: 35

Issue: 1

Pages: 75-81

Date: Jul

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Elemental profiles in feather samples from a mercury-contaminated lake in central California

ISSN: 0090-4341

Accession Number: ISI:000074020800013

Keywords: HEAVY-METALS; ACCUMULATION; REGION; MOLT

Abstract: Flight feathers from six bird species at Clear Lake, CA were analyzed to determine the extent and distribution of mercury contamination from an abandoned mercury mine and associated levels of 14 other elements. Feather samples were collected from adult and juvenile osprey (Pandion haliaetus), including juvenile osprey from three additional comparison sites; adult western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis); adult great blue herons (Ardea herodias); adult mallards (Anas platyrhynchos); adult turkey vultures (Cathartes aura); and juvenile double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus). Samples were analyzed by a multielemental x-ray fluorescence method. The osprey from Clear Lake showed significantly elevated mercury concentrations relative to the comparison sites, Different species at Clear Lake had different mercury concentrations based on trophic status; osprey exhibited the highest mercury concentrations and the mallards showed the lowest, Lastly, we quantified differences in elemental concentrations, including mercury, between adult and juvenile osprey from Clear Lake. Elements known to be nutrients, such as sulfur and zinc, did not vary significantly among species or sites. Reproductive success of osprey at Clear Lake was monitored from 1992 to 1996 to determine if osprey reproduction was depressed. During this five-year period, the breeding population grew from 10 to 20 nesting pairs and the average reproductive rate was 1.4 fledglings per nesting attempt. Although the osprey showed the highest mercury levels of any species sampled, their reproduction does not appear to be depressed.

Notes: ONLINE; birds; bioaccumulation

URL: <Go to ISI>://000074020800013

http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/f71nhytca5nx574w/fulltext.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 311

Author: T. Cairns and C. H. Parfitt

Year: 1980

Title: Persistence and Metabolism of Tde in California Clear Lake Fish

Journal: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

Volume: 24

Issue: 4

Pages: 504-510

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Persistence and Metabolism of Tde in California Clear Lake Fish

ISSN: 0007-4861

Accession Number: ISI:A1980JM15800002

Abstract: Clear Lake is a naturally occurring lake located in northern California in the inner coastal range of mountains. It is shallow (mean depth of 8 meters), has a surface area of approximately 42,000 acres and shows no thermal stratification. On three occasions in 1949, 1954, and 1957 a total of over 120,000 ibs. of TDE [l,l,-dichloro-2,2-bis-(chlorophenyl)- ethane] was applied to control the substantial population of Clear Lake gnats (Chaoboras astictopus) . A second and indirect source of additional contamination is the possible run off from numerous neighboring orchards (pears, almond, and walnut) and grape vineyards into creeks and streams feeding Clear Lake itself. In spite of the approximately 500,000 ibs of DDT applied agriculturally during 1949-1964, the observed residue levels in the lake proper does not indicate that this route of contamination was of any major proportions (RUDD and HERMAN 1972, and HERMAN et al. 1969). Additionally, these authors reported residue levels of TDE and isomers in the top 5 inches of sediment ranged from 0.05 ppm to 1.0 ppm. This TDE in the bottom sediments of the lake infers that bottom feeding species would probably suffer from greater exposure to such high levels of TDE.

Notes: ONLINE; fish; hitch; birds; clear lake; chemical

-pg 504

            -1949, 1954, 1957, 120,000 pounds of TDE into clear lake

            -plus additional run off from orchards

            -1949-1964, 500,000 pounds of DDT applied (agriculture)

                        -doesn’t appear to have contaminated lake much

            -TDE throughout lake

                        -.05-1.0 ppm in top 5 inches of sediment (harmful for benthic species)

            -western grebe decline connected to TDE

            -high concentration of TDE also found in fish (1958, 1965) but shown to be declining since last application in 1957

-pg 505

            -commercial fishing permits for carp, blackfish and hitch

-pg 509

            -persistence of TDE in lake 19 years later

            -high levels in carp show benthic species suffer greatest (highest concentration in sediment)

            -appears older (bigger) fish have higher TDE levels

-pg 506

            -table 1, TDE residues by species

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1980JM15800002

http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/g118q372g62585p1/fulltext.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Edited Book

Record Number: 465

Editor: A. Calhoun

Year: 1966

Title: Inland Fisheries Management

Publisher: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Inland Fisheries Management

Call Number: call # - SH 222 C3 C35 Shields UCD

Notes: fish

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 312

Author: D. Cannon

Year: 1970

Title: Clear Lake weather and climate study : summary of findings for years 1966-1969

Place Published: [S.l.

Publisher: s.n.

Number of Pages: 113 leaves

Short Title: Clear Lake weather and climate study : summary of findings for years 1966-1969

Accession Number: OCLC: 24369245 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G4581 K WRCA UCB

Keywords: Weather.

Climatology.

Irrigation water -- California.

Water-supply -- California.

Clearlake (Calif.)

Lake County (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; climate

University of California Agricultural Extension Service.

ill. ; 28 cm.

by Dale Cannon ... [et al.].

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 313

Author: H. J. Carney, Neo Martinez and Brian Feifarek

Year: 1994

Title: Food web biodiversity, patterns and interactions in complex natural ecosystems

Short Title: Food web biodiversity, patterns and interactions in complex natural ecosystems

Abstract: Food webs for three California lakes (Tahoe, Castle, Clear) have been assembled with some of the most detailed and complete data available to date. With this information we have constructed complete descriptive webs, which include all species, and functional webs, which include the abundant and other important species. These webs include up to 794 species in five major categories: algae, macrophytes, microheterotrophs, invertebrates, and fishes. There are clear and signi ficnnt departures of the California lake food webs from earl ier generalizations about trophic architecture and Iinks which were based on smaller and less complete webs. They include high proportions of basal species, low proportions

of top species, and much more complex webs with many links per species. These differences are readily explained by the improved information, and by the biology of lake ecosystems. The functional food webs show that strong species interactions, including trophic cascades, are most prevalent at intermediate productivities,

Notes: clear lake; fish; birds; insects

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 314

Author: E. J. Carpenter, R. E. Storie and S. W. Cosby

Year: 1931

Title: Soil survey of the Clear Lake Area, California

Journal: Field Oper U S Bur Chem & Soils

Volume: 1927

Issue: (13)

Pages: 1-45

Date: 1931

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Soil survey of the Clear Lake Area, California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19320600019898

Call Number: call # - S592 .C623 Shields UCD

Keywords: Soils -- California -- Clear Lake Region.

Soil surveys -- California -- Clear Lake Region.

Clear Lake Region (Calif.)

Notes: soil; clear lake

United States.; Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. ; California Agricultural Experiment Station.

ill., col. map ; 24 cm.

Cover title./ "In cooperation with the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station."/ Includes bibliographical references.

by E.J. Carpenter and R. Earl Storie and Stanley W. Cosby.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

-pg 1

            -70 miles north of san Francisco bay

            -12 miles long, 1-6 miles wide

            -mount konokti, 4,100 feet on south shore of clear lake

-pg 2

            -1,300 feet elevation

-pg 3

            -climate

                        -summers dry with moderately high temperatures, winters are mild with moderate rainfall (October to may)

-pg 4

            -agriculture-citrus, figs, pears, walnuts, alfalfa, grain (1868), apple, peach, prunes, grapes

            -1811, first trappers

            -1840, Salvador Vallejo started agriculture

-pg 5

            -1850, real settlement

            -1854, settlers arrive in higher numbers

            -may 20, 1861, lake county organized

            -cattle, oats, barely, corn

-pg 6

            -soils of the

                        -rincon, cole, clear lake, Dublin, yolo for pears

                        -aiken, konokti, Rincon, yolo for walnuts

                        -manzanita, pinole for grapes and prunes

                        -bayside for truck gardening

                        -yolo for alfalfa and hops

-pg 12

            -yolo fine sandy loam (well drained but when very wet takes awhile) on some stream bottoms

-pg 22

            -clear lake clay adobe (poor drainage), adjoins clear lake

-pg 24

            -dublin clay adobe (bad drainage), borders clear lake

-pg 26

            -manzanita gravely fine sand loam (well drained), headwaters of Kelsey creek and borders cold creek

-pg 28

            -pinole gravelly fine sandy loam, mouth of scotts creek and borders clear lake

-pg 31

            -hugo clay loam (good drainage), along middle creek

-pg 32

            -aiken clay loam, borders alluvial soils along clear lake

-pg 33

            -aiken gravelly clay loam, borders clear lake paks and konokti bay

-pg 34

            -bayside silty clay loam, bottom of lake

-pg 35

            -butte gravelly sand (good drainage), clear lake park

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19320600019898

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 315

Author: R. W. Casteel

Year: 1977

Title: Fish remains from core 6, Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Series Title: Reports-Open file series - United States Geological Survey ;; 77-639;

Place Published: Menlo Park, Calif.

Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey

Number of Pages: ii, 154 p.

Short Title: Fish remains from core 6, Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 3582590 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QE75 .O7 no.77-639 Main Lib UCSB

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; archaeological

Geological Survey (U.S.)

ill., map ; 27 cm.

Bibliography: p. 11-12.

by Richard W. Casteel... [et al.].

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 316

Author: R. W. Casteel

Year: 1979

Title: Fish remains from core 8, Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Series Title: Reports-Open file series - United States Geological Survey ;; 79-1148;

Place Published: [Reston, Va.]

Publisher: U.S. Geological Survey

Number of Pages: ii, 98 leaves

Short Title: Fish remains from core 8, Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 6207646 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QE75 .O7 no.79-1148 Main Lib UCSB

Keywords: Fishes, Fossil -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; arcaeological

Geological Survey (U.S.)

28 cm.

Chiefly tables./ Includes bibliographical references (leaves 12-14).

by Richard W. Casteel ... [et al.].

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 506

Author: R. W. Casteel, D. P. Adam and J. D. Sims

Year: 1977

Title: LATE-PLEISTOCENE AND HOLOCENE REMAINS OF HYSTEROCARPUS-TRASKI (TULE PERCH) FROM CLEAR LAKE, CALIFORNIA, AND INFERRED HOLOCENE TEMPERATURE-FLUCTUATIONS

Journal: Quaternary Research

Volume: 7

Issue: 1

Pages: 133-143

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: LATE-PLEISTOCENE AND HOLOCENE REMAINS OF HYSTEROCARPUS-TRASKI (TULE PERCH) FROM CLEAR LAKE, CALIFORNIA, AND INFERRED HOLOCENE TEMPERATURE-FLUCTUATIONS

Alternate Journal: Quat. Res.

ISSN: 0033-5894

Accession Number: ISI:A1977CV28700006

Call Number: call # - UCD PhySciEng QE699.A1 Q2

Abstract: The remains of scales of Hysterocarpus traski Gibbons (Tule perch) were found throughout a 27.44-m core from Clear Lake. Most scales occurred between the mud surface and deposits approximately 11,000 years old. Changes in growth rates of the animals were examined by measuring scale annuli and applying an empirically established regression of fish length on scale radius. The data indicate a pattern of accelerating growth rates, reaching a peak between reverse similar, equals4000 and 2800 BP. After reverse similar, equals2800 BP, growth rates decline markedly. Because the growth rates of these animals are essentially dependent on temperature, the changes observed in the patterns of growth probably reflect changes in climate in the northern Coast Range. The general pattern of inferred temperature increase during the early and middle Holocene, ending between reverse similar, equals4000 and 2800 BP, is consistent with evidence from tree-line studies and palynology indicating higher temperatures in parts of the western United States during this period.

Notes: ISI Document Delivery No.: CV287

Times Cited: 8

Cited Reference Count: 47

ACADEMIC PRESS INC JNL-COMP SUBSCRIPTIONS

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1977CV28700006

Author Address: SIMON FRASER UNIV,DEPT ARCHAEOL,BURNABY V5A 1S6,BRITISH COLUMBI,CANADA. US GEOL SURVEY,MENLO PK,CA 94025.

Language: English

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 317

Author: R. W. Casteel and M. J. Rymer

Year: 1975

Title: Fossil Fishes from the Plicene or Pleistocene Cache Formation, Lake County, California

Short Title: Fossil Fishes from the Plicene or Pleistocene Cache Formation, Lake County, California

Accession Number: 7602495

Keywords: *lakes; *fish; *geologic time; *pleistocene epoch; *california;

freshwater fish; *lake county(calif); *fossil fishes; cache formation;

fossil-current fish relationships

SW 0850 Lakes

Abstract: The remains of fossil fishes comprising three species were found in the cache formation in lake county, calif. the rocks containing the fossils are considered to be late pliocene or early pleistocene. the species are all freshwater and primarily quiet-water types that now live in clear lake and the waters of the surrounding area, suggesting continuity between the present lake and a lake represented by the rocks of the cache formation. (woodard-usgs)

Notes: fish; archaeological

Journal of research of the u s geological survey, vol 3, no 5, p 619-622, september-october 1975. 2 fig, 26 ref.

Author Address: GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, MENLO PARK, CALIF

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 318

Author: R. W. A. D. P. S. J. D. Casteel

Year: 1975

Title: Fish remains from core 7, Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Series Title: Open-file report ;; 75-173; Variation: U.S. Geological Survey open-file report ;; 75-173.

Place Published: [Reston, VA?]

Publisher: United States Geological Survey

Number of Pages: ii, 67 leaves

Short Title: Fish remains from core 7, Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 65642312 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QE75 .O7 75-173 Main Lib UCSB

LC: QE75

Keywords: Fishes, Fossil -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; archaeological

ill. map ; 27 cm.

Cover title/ Chiefly tables./ Includes bibliographical references (leaf 6).

by Richard W. Casteel, David P. Adam, and John D. Sims.

Government publication (gpb); National government publication (ngp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 135

Author: W. A. Cattell

Year: 1909

Title: Report on the Clear Lake power and irrigation project

Place Published: San Francisco

Publisher: Cal., [The Stanley-Taylor Company]

Number of Pages: 55 p. incl. tables. map, 2 diagrs. 28 cm.

Short Title: Report on the Clear Lake power and irrigation project

Accession Number: OCLC: 11092681 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - CAL 15:26 Shields UCD special collections

LC: TK1425.C4

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake

by W.A. Cattell ... More Records: Show record information

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 560

Author: J. Cech

Year: 1978

Title: Collecting Permit Summary

Series Editor: C. D. o. P. a. Recreation and C. D. o. F. a. Game

Place Published: University of California-Davis

Date: November 15, 1978

Short Title: Collecting Permit Summary

Abstract: Memo to Mr. Phillips L. Claud of the CA Dept. of Parks and Recreation from Joseph J. Cech. Collecting Permit summary for Clear Lake State Park. Silversides, Sculpins, and Hitch most abundant...1978

Research Notes: Collecting Permit photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

 

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 319

Author: J. J. Cech and M. J. Massingill

Year: 1995

Title: Tradeoffs between Respiration and Feeding in Sacramento Blackfish, Orthodon Microlepidotus

Journal: Environmental Biology of Fishes

Volume: 44

Issue: 1-3

Pages: 157-163

Date: Oct

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Tradeoffs between Respiration and Feeding in Sacramento Blackfish, Orthodon Microlepidotus

ISSN: 0378-1909

Accession Number: ISI:A1995TA16700012

Keywords: GILL VENTILATION; HYPOXIA; RESPIRATION; SUSPENSION FEEDING EFFICIENCY;

CYPRINIDAE

TROUT SALMO-GAIRDNERI; DYNAMIC ACTION; ABRAMIS-BRAMA; BLOOD-FLOW;

GILLS; OXYGEN; FISH; CYPRINIDAE; HYPOXIA; BREAM

Abstract: Suspension-feeding fishes use gill structures for both respiration (lamellae) and food capture (rakers). During hypoxic exposure in eutrophic lakes or poorly circulated sloughs, many fishes, including Sacramento black-fish, Orthodon microlepidotus, increase their gill water flows, in part by increasing ventilatory stroke volumes. Stroke volume increases could compromise particle sieving efficiency by spreading interdigitated gill rakers from adjacent gill arches, although blackfish capture food particles by raker-guided water flows to a sticky buccal roof. Using van Dam-type respirometers, blackfish respiratory variables and feeding efficiency (Artemia nauplii) were measured under normoxia (>130 torr PO2) and hypoxia (60 torr PO2). Compared with non-feeding, normoxic conditions, gill ventilation volume, frequency, stroke volume, and gape all increased, while O-2, uptake efficiency decreased, during hypoxia and during feeding. O-2, consumption increased during feeding treatments, and % uptake of nauplii showed no difference between normoxic and hypoxic groups. Thus, blackfish display respiratory adaptations, including increased ventilatory stroke volumes, to survive in hypoxic environments such as Clear Lake, California. Importantly, they have also evolved a particle capture mechanism that allows efficient suspension-feeding under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

Notes: ONLINE; fish

 

-pg 157

            -blackfish have respiratory adaptations to survive in hypoxic environments (eg clear lake)

            -have particle capture mechanisms for normoxic and hypoxic conditions

-pg 158

            -native, planktivorous of warm water in central California (including clear lake)

            -commercially fished in clear lake

-pg 162

            -appears as though blackfish should be able to feed in all portions of clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1995TA16700012

http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/wn187h3tw8t4t55r/fulltext.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 511

Author: J. J. J. Cech, Michael J . Massingill & Henrietta Sterna

Year: 1982

Title: Growth of juvenile sacramento blackfish, Orthodon microlepidotus

Journal: Hydrobiologia

Volume: 97

Pages: 75-80

Start Page: 75

Short Title: Growth of juvenile sacramento blackfish, Orthodon microlepidotus

Abstract: Growth rates of juvenile (1-8 g) Sacramento blackfish, an omnivorous California cyprinid which grows to >1 .5 kg, were measured at three temperature ranges in laboratory aquaria where several diets were offered ad lib . and at four stocking densities in small ponds where natural food was available . Growth rates generally increased with elevations in environmental temperature . Growth in aquaria was possible with strictly plant-based diets, but was faster with pelleted diets higher in protein, lipids, and total calories . Growth rates

in ponds increased with decreased stocking densities and approximated or exceeded those measured in laboratory aquaria for blackfish fed pelleted diets . The data also support the importance of energy-rich food organisms (e.g., zooplankton) in the diet of young-of-the-year blackfish in Clear Lake, California .

Notes: fish

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 495

Author: R. C. Chamberlin, B. Finney, M. Hood, P. Lehman, M. McKee, & R. Willis

Year: 1990

Title: Abatement & Control Study: Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine & Clear Lake, California

Institution: Regional Water Quality Control Board: Central Valley Region

Document Number: Contract # - 7-703-150-0

Short Title: Abatement & Control Study: Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine & Clear Lake, California

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: mine; clear lake

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 320

Author: H. M. Choi and J. J. Cech, Jr.

Year: 1994

Title: Methyl mercury uptake by the gills of Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus)

Series Editor: D. D. MacKinlay

Short Title: Methyl mercury uptake by the gills of Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus)

ISBN: 0969863101

Accession Number: 3809043

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1997 C465 Shields UCD micro copy collections and special collections

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: bioaccumulation; gills; methyl mercury; mining;

Article Taxonomic Terms: Orthodon microlepidotus; Article Geographic

Terms: USA, California, Clear L.

Freshwater

Q5 01504 Effects on organisms

Abstract: The Clear Lake basin, like others in Northern California, is rich in mercury-containing cinnabar ore. Mercury from the Lake sediment and water is taken up by organisms and accumulates to levels detrimental to humans. For example, fish muscle tissue concentrations exceed USFDA safe limits (1 ppm) in bass Micropterus and catfish Ictalurus. It had been found that mercury is present in freshwater fish species almost all as methyl mercury. While it is well documented that mercury accumulates in animal tissues after exposure, mechanisms underlying the uptake of mercury by fish are not fully understood. There have been numerous direct toxicity studies as well as studies of biochemical and physiological effects of mercury in fish. Many studies have demonstrated experimentally that fish accumulate mercury directly from the surrounding water as well as from food. In many studies, it has been demonstrated that the accumulation of heavy metals in aquatic organisms can be affected by the presence of suspended or dissolved substances, such as sediment, humic substances and other sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). About 50% of the DOC in uncolored surface waters of the U.S. consist of humic substances. It has been well established that this aquatic humus, apparently in solution, complexes with or chelates heavy metal ions in natural waters and thereby changes the state of trace metals in solution. This reduces the amount of metal that is "freely dissolved" and therefore the amount bioavailable to fish. During the past 10 years, there have been several reports on the influence of inorganic and organic chelators on the uptake, accumulation and toxicity of heavy metals to living organisms.

Notes: fish; chemistry

Fish physiology association, vancouver, bc (canada). 1994.

International Fish Physiology Symposium, Vancouver, BC (Canada), 16-21 Jul 1994

Incl. 27 ref.

Book Monograph; Conference

Author Address: Dep. Wildl. and Fish. Biol., Univ. California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 321

Author: M. H. Choi, J. J. CECH, JR., & M.C. LAGUNAS-SOLAR

Year: 1998

Title: Bioavailability of methylmercury to Sacramento Blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus): dissolved organic carbon effects

Journal: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Volume: 17

Issue: 4

Pages: 695–701

Short Title: Bioavailability of methylmercury to Sacramento Blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus): dissolved organic carbon effects

Keywords: Methylmercury, Bioavailability, Complexation, Sacramento blackfish, Dissolved organic carbon

Abstract: The effect of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on methylmercury (MeHg) uptake across the gills of Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus) was investigated using the Hg-203 radioisotope (half life 5 46.9 d). The efficiency of fish gills in extracting MeHg (1.4 ng/L) from water was measured using a McKim-type fish respirometer that separated exposure (inspired) water from expired water. Blackfish gill ventilation and oxygen consumption rates remained constant, while Me203Hg uptake was decreased significantly (p , 0.05) in the presence of DOC (2 and 5 mg C/L). Mean Me203Hg extraction efficiency, uptake rate constant, and blood to inspired water ratio decreased 78%, 73%, and 63%, respectively, with 2 mg C/L of DOC, and 85%, 82%, and 70% with 5 mg C/L DOC, compared to the Me203Hg reference treatment group. Because respiratory parameters remained unchanged, reductions in Me203Hg uptake indicate strong interactions between DOC and Me203Hg. Methyl203Hg levels in fish gills, kidney, and spleen from 2 and 5 mg C/L were significantly lower (p , 0.05) than those observed from the reference treatment group. These reductions in uptake (bioavailability) support the hypothesis that trans-gill transport of Me203Hg is inhibited when it is complexed by DOC in the aqueous medium, decreasing Me203Hg uptake and accumulation in fish organs

Notes: fish; pollution; ONLINE

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 322

Author: G. A. Coleman

Year: 1930

Title: A biological survey of Clear Lake, Lake County [California]

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 16

Issue: (3)

Pages: 221-227

Date: 1930

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: A biological survey of Clear Lake, Lake County [California]

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19330700015273

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: Physio-graphic and hydrobiological conditions, with lists of algae, crustaceans, insects, and fish.

Notes: clear lake; fish

 

-pg 221

            -“enormous” amounts of young fish

-pg 223

            -kelsey, scott, middle, cold creeks feed clear lake

            -cache creek is only outlet, intermittent

            -springs carry in borax, iron, soda, sulfur

            -small stream flows through old sulfur banks (via cinnabar mine), lower part of northeast arm-turns water milky

                        -1926, fish kill due to sulphuric acid

            -shore line

                        -variety, tule is abundant

                        -shelter for fish

                        -bass fond of tules around islands

            -bottom

                        -level, fine silt (volcanic sand, etc)

            -temperature

                        -january, 45-47 F (surface), 30 ft 2 F less

                        -february, surface 50-52 F

                        -march, 55 F

                        -april, 57-60 F

                        -summer/fall 60-70 F, occasionally 75-80 F

            -dissolved oxygen in January, 100-210% saturation

            -high carbon dioxide, 15-45 ppm

            -rain

                        -previous to 1925, drought, dropped 1.7 feet

                        -1924-1925, heavy rain

            -lots of plankton, insects (good fish food)

            -fish

                        -native-sacramento perch, hitch (most abundant), blackfish, sacramento sucker, squawfish, sacramento chub, splittail, minnows, silversides

                        -introduced-european carp, catfish, brown spotted catfish, bass (small and large, calico), crappie, bluegill, trout, steelhead

                        -recommended introductions, Louisiana sunfish

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19330700015273

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 508

Author: T. S. Collin Eagles-Smith, Art Colwell, Norm Anderson, and Peter B. Moyle

Title: Changes in Fish Diets and Mercury Bioaccumulation in Clear Lake, California: Effects of an Invasive Planktivorous Fish

Secondary Title: American Fisheries Society conference presentation

Type of Work: Presentation

Short Title: Changes in Fish Diets and Mercury Bioaccumulation in Clear Lake, California: Effects of an Invasive Planktivorous Fish

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 323

Author: S. F. Cook

Year: 1943

Title: The Conflict Between the California Indian and White Civilization, I-IV

Series Title: Ibero-Americana

Publisher: University of California Press, Berkeley, CA

Volume: 21-24

Short Title: The Conflict Between the California Indian and White Civilization, I-IV

Call Number: call # - F1401 .C3 no.21-24 Shields UCD and Special Collections Harrison Collection no.21-24***no.24: See Accompanying Materials File under call number

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement

 

-           Pg 205

- 1841-vallejo went to CL and slaughtered 150 people “CL massacre)

- 1833-southern pomo attackes by father Mercado, 21 killed

-           Pg 213

- 1837-smallpox epidemic

-           Pg 269

- 1860’s-american invasion leads to natives with venereal diseases

-           Pg 296

- 1865 article-indians eat fish and waterfowl, tule roots, grass seeds

-           Pg 305

- Kelseys-brutal repressive measures: starving, beating, murdering Indian workmen

    - Natives resorted to murder

-           Pg 310

- Indian slave trading

-           Pg 317

- 1862-CL Indians worked as migrant harvesters

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 324

Author: S. F. Cook, Jr., J.D. Connors and R.L. Moore

Year: 1964

Title: The impact of the fishery upon the midge populations of Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Journal: Ann Entomol Soc Amer

Volume: 57

Pages: 701-707

Short Title: The impact of the fishery upon the midge populations of Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Call Number: call # - QL461.E57

Abstract: The midge, or gnat, of primary concern in this study was the Clear Lake gnat, Chaoborus astictopus Dyar and Shannon (Culicidae: Chaoborinae) , a species of considerable economic concern to this area. Despite its great abundance in this environment, this gnat species was found in less than 16% of the 1940 stomachs examined from representatives of virtually every fish species occurring in Clear Lake. Chironomid midges, on the other hand, though far less abundant than chaoborids in this lake, were found in 43% of the stomachs examined. From an overall evaluation of the results obtained, an attempt was made to explain possible reasons why the Clear Lake gnat was not more heavily utilized for food. This information will provide a basis to be used in evaluating those characteristics most potentially desirable in any alien fish species under consideration for introduction into Clear Lake as a possible biological control agent of the Clear Lake gnat.

Notes: insects; fish

 

-pg 701

            -clear lake gnat in 16% of fish stomachs (1940). Midge in 43% of fish stomachs (1940)

            -both a serious nuisance

            -contains nutritional status of fish

            -clear lake gnat found in 16% of stomachs

            -midges found in 63% of stomachs

            -gnat densities in clear lake are largest

-pg 702

            -C. astictopus is dominate midge species although they are chemically controlled

                        -have always existed in great numbers

                        -life history

                                    -become planktonic, disperse

            -fishery (much change in 50 years)

                        -increase alien species, decrease natives

            -1964, no stickleback, chub (not since 1938, extinct in area), roach

                        -riffle=prickly sculpin

            -since 1951-1964, introduction of white crappie, golden shiner, channel catfish

            -*table 1, fish abundances

-pg 703

                        -did not observe three spined stickleback (stream fish), western roach (stream fish), thick tailed chub (not since 1938), as Murphy did in 1951

                        -white crappie, golden shiner, channel catfish have been introduced since murphy

                        -table of fish in clear lake as of 1963

            -total fry catch

                        -bluegill 75%, hitch/blackfish 20%, all others 5%

-pg 704

                        -fry and juveniles (littoral)

                                    -75% bluegill, 20% hitch/blackfish

            -may, fish occupy littoral zone due to spawning

            -august, fish occupy profundal zone

-pg 705

            -chironomids utilized more than Chaoborus (higher population numbers)

            -crappie/sacramento perch eat most of Chaborus

                        -table 3 (pg 706)

            -table 2, percentage of midge/gnat consumption

-pg 706

            -sacramento perch numbers very low die to introductions. Appear to once have been main midge predators

            -midge appear to be large part of nutrition

 

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 325

Author: S. F. Cook, Jr. and R.L. Moore

Year: 1970

Title: Mississippi silverside (Menidia audens) established in California

Journal: Transactions of the American Fisheries Society

Volume: 99

Issue: 1

Pages: 70-73

Short Title: Mississippi silverside (Menidia audens) established in California

Call Number: call # - SH1.A5 Shields UCD

Abstract: Menidia audens were introduced into Upper and Lower Blue Lakes, and in Clear Lake, Lake County, during the fall of 1967, as a result of previous study indicating a high potential for this species as a biological control agent for aquatic midges, and as a forage species for game fishes. Although the species has not as yet been recovered from Upper Blue Lake, it is doing well in Lower Blue Lake, and has already become a predominant component of the fish fauna  of Clear Lake.

Notes: fish; insects

 

-pg 70

            -fall 1967, silverside introduced as midge control and forage fish and plankton reduction

-pg 71

            -october 1967, 3,000 placed in clear lake. Not endorsed by California department of fish and game (DFG)

            -1968, massive seine hauls of silverside

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 326

Author: S. F. Cook, Jr.

Year: 1981

Title: The Clear Lake Example: An Ecological Approach to Pest Management

Journal: Environment

Volume: 23

Issue: 10

Pages: 25-30

Short Title: The Clear Lake Example: An Ecological Approach to Pest Management

ISSN: 0013-9149

Accession Number: 232047

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: algal blooms; biological control; freshwater

lakes; introduced species; predation; Article Taxonomic Terms:

Chaoborus astictopus; Menidia audens; Article Geographic Terms: USA,

California, Clear L.

effects on; freshwater lakes

Freshwater

D 04710 Control; Q1 01485 Species interactions: pests and control; D

04310 Freshwater

Abstract: After repeated failures to control midges and algae at Clear Lake, California, through conventional methods, a small fish, the Mississippi Silverside, was introduced into the lake in 1967 as a possible means of biological control. Algal levels in the lake have since declined and the Clear Lake "Gnat" appears to be contained. Clear Lake may thus prove to be one of the first examples of successful ecological pest management.

Notes: fish; clear lake; insects

1981.

Journal Article

Author Address: Evergreen State Coll., Olympia, WA 98505, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 327

Author: S. F. Cook and J. D. Conners

Year: 1963

Title: The short-term side effects of the insecticidal treatment of Clear Lake, Lake County, California, in 1962

Journal: Ann Entomol Soc Amer

Volume: 56

Issue: (6)

Pages: 819-824

Date: 1963

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: The short-term side effects of the insecticidal treatment of Clear Lake, Lake County, California, in 1962

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19644500040784

Call Number: call # - QL461 .E57 Shields UCD

Abstract: Clear Lake, Lake County, California, was treated to control the Clear Lake gnat, Chaoborus astictopus Dyar and Shannon, during the summer of 1962 with 3 ppb methyl parathion. Concurrent with this control project, information was gathered on representatives of the major trophic groups. This data was compared with similar data gathered at the same time the previous non-treatment year to determine if any immediate side effects of the insecticide were manifest. Although it was impossible to study all the organisms involved with the treatment, results indicated a possible depressing effect only upon the zooplankton levels. No direct effects on the bottom fauna, other than C. astictopus, or on the fishery were observed. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: Authors

Notes: insects; fish; bioaccumulation; birds

 

-pg 819

            -summer 1962, clear lake treated with 3 ppb methyl parathion (Chaoborus astictopus control)

            -direct effect on zooplankton and gnat, not on fishery or other bottom fauna

            -1949, briefly treated with DDD (TDE)

            -summer 1954, gnats came back and lake re-retreated

            -1957, treated again (failure)

            -accumulation of poison in species

            -1962, alternative used by mosquito abatement (methyl parathion)

            -article focuses on immediate direct effects

-pg 820

            -no permanent inflow streams

            -methyl parathion deteriorates 50% in 48 hours, within 2 weeks it’s nearly gone

                        -can be metabolized and excreted

            -3 total treatments during larval stage

-pg 821

            -during treatment year, immediate decrease in zooplankton

            -1962, Anabaena blooms but zooplankton low

-pg 822

            -oligochaetes remained constant

            -chironomids decrease rapidly after second treatment

            -hitch and blackfish abundant

            -star of summer, regular fish die offs

            -more dead fish seen before treatment

            -no affect on fish

-pg 823

            -western grebe hurt most by DDD treatments. 1,000 nesting pairs to 25

            -no physical adverse symptoms to methyl parathion observed

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19644500040784

Author Address: Lake County Mosquito Abatement Dist., Lakeport, Calif., USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 329

Author: S. F. Cook and R. L. Moore

Year: 1969

Title: The Effects of a Rotenone Treatment on the Insect Fauna of a California Stream

Short Title: The Effects of a Rotenone Treatment on the Insect Fauna of a California Stream

Accession Number: 7003624

Keywords: *rotenone; *aquatic insects; water pollution effects; diptera;

caddisflies; mayflies; persistence; larvae; treatment; fish control

agents; *recovery; *insect fauna; russian river; california;

ephemeroptera; trichopters; simuliids

SW 3030 Effects of pollution

Abstract: The population levels of the major insect groups subsequent to rotenone treatment in the treated and untreated zones in robinson creek were examined in both pools and riffles. a great resurgence of insect fauna after their initial near annihilation in the treated zone was noticed. the simuliids were the first major group to make a comeback in the treated riffles. within two weeks they had taken over all available attachment space in the riffles. the authors feel that elimination of potential predators may account for this resurgence. it appears as if rotenone treatment had little lasting effect upon the non-target insect fauna of significance as fish forage. the authors caution relating these data to other instances of stream poisoning, since only a portion of robinson creek was treated. season of treatment, sampling biases, and possible undetected species shifts are other points to be considered in evaluation of such projects. (sjolseth-washington)

Notes: insects; fish; tributary

Transactions of american fisheries society, vol 98, no 3, p 539-544, 1969. 3 ref, 6 fig.

Author Address: CALIFORNIA UNIV., DAVIS. DEPT. OF ZOOLOGY; AND CALIFORNIA STATE DEPT. OF FISH AND GAME, SAN FRANCISCO

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 330

Author: S. F. Cook, R. L. Moore and J. D. Conners

Year: 1966

Title: The status of the native fishes of Clear Lake, Lake County. California

Journal: Wasmann J Biol

Volume: 24

Issue: (1)

Pages: 141-160

Date: 1966

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: The status of the native fishes of Clear Lake, Lake County. California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19674800109303

Call Number: call # - SIO 1 WA38 Scripps UCSD; QH1.W39 S&E lib UCSC

Notes: fish; clear lake

 

-pg 141

            -stone (1874), first collection of clear lake fishes

            -1895, 13 fishes in clear lake

            -changes since 1895

                        -land use practices and increased water demands causing reduction in the period of flow and inflow streams

                        -introduction of 12 exotic fishes

                        -sedimentation, siltation, pollution, shoreline filling. All causing increased eutrophication of the lake

-pg 143

            -table, species abundance (1961-1963)

                        -hitch>blackfish>prickly sculpin>tule perch>splittail>squawfish>sacramento perch> sucker>rainbow trout

-pg 144

            -stream spawners have declined more than lake spawners

            -lack of fires to burn shrubs means more water taken by shrubs therefore less water into the watershed

-pg 145

            -STREAM SPAWNERS

                        -hitch

                                    -most abundant native in clear lake

                                    -1938 abundant, 1948 rare

                                                -shows they depend on rainfall

                                    -will also spawn in lake

                                    -1961-1963, ascending every stream possible. Spill out onto roads

                                    -1964, dry spring, few fish

                                    -1957ish, January 3, enter creeks but major runs occur in march and april

-pg 146

                                    -early june, many fry seined

                                    -first week of june, young hitch gone from scotts creek

                        -splittail

                                    -found in clear lake, middle creek

                                    -summer die offs

                                    -1930 and 1941, very abundant

                                    -early 1940’s, see reduction

-pg 147

                                    -not rare in 1966 but stressed

                        -sacramento squawfish

                                    -1895 and 1938, abundant

                                    -15-20 pounds

                                    -large runs in Kelsey creek

                                    -1946-1947 in decline. Crash in 1940’s

                                    -65-166 mm long

-pg 148

                                    -some populations are upstream and go to clear lake in rains

                                                -these populations appear to keep species alive

                        -western sucker

                                    -1930’s, relatively common

                                    -migration back to lake by june 1

                                    -young are 65-166 mm, adults are 275-376 mm

                                    -still occurs in permanent water of watershed. Population numbers depend on water

                        -rainbow trout

                                    -1914, cache creek dam built

                                                -before many trout went to clear lake to spawn

                                    -face parasitization

                                    -spring 1963, large runs on scotts creek and other tributaries

                                    -6-14 inches long

                                    -maintain populations in watersheds (eg scotts creek)

                                    -numbers are not good

-pg 151

            -LAKE SPAWNERS

                        -besides sacramento perch, populations are stable

                        -12 introductions to clear lake (1966)

                        -blackfish

                                    -still in large numbers

                                    -2-3 pounds

                                    -large die offs and commercial fishing occurs

                                    -eat plankton

-pg 153

                                    -forage species

                                    -adhesive eggs, 15 days to hatch (58 F)

                        -prickly sculpin

-pg 154

                                    -active at night

                                    -second most common item in bass

                                    -1.5-12 inches long

                                    -population not in danger

                        -tule perch

                                    -reasonably abundant

                                    -spawn in june or july

-pg 155

                        -sacramento perch

                                    -1895, becoming scarce due to competition with carp

                                    -1930, abundant

                                    -1943, moderately abundant

                                    -1946-1947, small but healthy population

                                    -don’t guard eggs (Murphy 1951), but hopkirk says males are defensive

-pg 156

                                    -mid 1950’s, taken commonly by anglers, rarely taken by 1966

                                    -bluegill overrun lake

                                    -recent introduction of redear sunfish

                        -thicktail chub, three spined stickleback and western roach not observed

-pg 157

                        -chub

                                    -was abundant, now appears extinct

                                    -1938, last one taken from the lake

                                    -1895 and 1925, common

                        -roach

                                    -in watershed but not clear lake

                        -stickleback

                                    -1965, april, two individuals taken in tributary

                        -pacific lamprey

                                    -not observed

                        -hardhead and speckled dace

                                    -taken in watershed below dam

-pg 158

                                    -probably never in clear lake

            -summary

                        -ok species-hitch, blackfish, tule perch, prickly sculpin

                        -not ok species-chub, trout, sucker, squawfish, splittail, perch

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19674800109303

Author Address: Lake County Mosquito Abatement Dist., Lakeport, Calif., USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Audiovisual Material

Record Number: 331

Author: H. M. P. Curdts

Year: 1991

Title: Where do we fit in?

Publisher: Santa Rosa, Calif. : Palmer Video Productions

Extent of Work: 1 videocassette (9 min.)

Type: Videorecording (vid); Videocassette (vca); VHS tape (vhs)

Short Title: Where do we fit in?

Accession Number: OCLC: 61391785 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 979.417 WHERE Videocassettes Redbud Lib

Keywords: Nature -- Effect of human beings on -- California -- Clear Lake Region.

Natural history -- California -- Clear Lake Region.

Clear Lake (Calif.) Region -- Environmental conditions.

Abstract: Discusses the widespread impact of humans on Clear Lake, Calif., and its surrounding landscapes as development increases.

Notes: clear lake; settlement

Palmer Video Productions.

sd., col. ; 1/2 in.

VHS, hi-fi.

Participants: Narrator, Paul MacCready.

Palmer Media Productions. Director/producer/videographer, Heath Curdts ; music, Jim Brown, Sr., Brian Whistler.

Visual Material

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 332

Author: B. Curtis

Year: 1949

Title: The warm water game fishes of California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 35

Issue: 4

Pages: 255-274

Short Title: The warm water game fishes of California

Call Number: call # - SK.351.C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: When Nature was handing out her gifts so generously to California she was guilty of one oversight: she left a serious scarcity of game fishes in the warmer inland waters of the State. The salmon swarmed through San Francisco Bay and the Delta to their spawning grounds in the cooler tributaries above, and the steelhead swam up the coastal streams to lay their eggs and return to the sea. But when the first white man came there was only one game fish which resided permanently in the warm inland waters-the Sacramento perch, confined mostly to the

Sacramento-San Joaquin River system. The striped bass, the black basses, the sunfishes, the catfishes, which are now so widespread and furnish so much fishing, are not native sons; they have been brought by man from east of the Rockies since 1870.

 

The purpose of this article is to tell something of the habits and the geographical range of these fishes, and to enable anglers and others to identify them. It is based to some extent on original observation and experience, but also draws on the published work of others (see "References" at end). In its preparation, valuable technical advice has been received from several members of the Bureau of Fish Conservation of the California State Division of Fish and Game, particularly from William A. Dill, Chester A. Woodhull, and Garth I. Murphy; and valuable suggestions from Dr. R. W. Eschmeyer the Tennessee Valley authoritv.

Notes: fish

 

-pg 259

            -perch information

-pg 260

            -black basses

-pg 263

            -sunfishes

-pg 264

            -crappies

-pg 265

            -sacramento perch, significant numbers in clear lake (1949)

                        -june 15, 1947, spawning in clear lake

-pg 268

            -catfish

-pg 269

            -perch

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 333

Author: L. Darling

Year: 1940

Title: Protocoronospora on Phora-dendron flavescens in California

Journal: Madrono

Volume: 5

Issue: (8)

Pages: 241-246

Date: 1940

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Protocoronospora on Phora-dendron flavescens in California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19411500002738

Call Number: call # - QK1 .M3 One Day Loan Shields UCD

Abstract: Protocoronospora phoradendri infects Phora dendron flavescens var. macrophyllum which is parasitic on willows and poplars growing on the shore of Clear Lake, Lake County, California.-L. Darling.

Notes: botany; clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19411500002738

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 334

Author: S. P. Davis

Year: 1963

Title: Commercial freshwater fisheries of California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 49

Issue: (2)

Pages: 84-94

Date: 1963

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Commercial freshwater fisheries of California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19634400004905

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: Seven species of true freshwater fish (Sacramento blackfish. Orthodon microlepidotus; big mouth buffalo, Ictiobus cyprinella; carp, Cyprinus carpio; hardhead, Mylopharodon conocephalus; hitch, Lavinia exilicauda; splittail, Pogonicthys macrolepidotus; western sucker, Catostomus occidentalis) are taken commercially in California. Rough fish landings in 1960 amounted to nearly a half million pounds worth about $55,000 to the fisherman. Lakes and reservoirs yielded 91% of all commercial landings with rivers and irrigation canals supplying the remainder. Clear Lake, the main producer, contributed 57% of the 1960 catch. Three types of gear are used to harvest commercial rough fish; shore seines accounted for the largest poundage followed by traps, and hook and line. The best season for shore seining is during fall and winter when reservoirs are shallow, water temperatures drop, and canals are drained. Carp are more readily taken by trap from Aug. through Nov. No seasonal pattern is evident for best hook and line fishing. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: S. P. Davis

Notes: fish; hitch; settlement

 

-pg 84

            -commercial take in California waters

                        -blackfish, bigmouth buffalo (1942?), carp (1812), hardhead, hitch, splittail, western sucker

-pg 85

            -1960, clear lake provided 279,835 pounds of the 494,706 statewide

-pg 86

            -1932-1936, increase in rough fish catch due to clear lake. By 1937, no longer leader

            -take tables, numbers on rough fish caught in California

-pg 90

            -splittail in sacramento river

-pg 91

            -blackfish seining in clear lake (October-april)

-pg 92

            -fish taken to market in china town and other places

-pg 93

            -money for fish (table)

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19634400004905

Author Address: Calif. Dept. Fish and Game, Sacramento, Calif., USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 335

Author: P. De Percin and P. M. Randall

Year: 2001

Title: Characterization and Eh/pH-Based Leaching Tests of Mercury-Containing Mining Wastes from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine, Lake County, California

Type: Final rept

Short Title: Characterization and Eh/pH-Based Leaching Tests of Mercury-Containing Mining Wastes from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine, Lake County, California

Accession Number: PB2003100710

Keywords: Leaching; Mercury; Mining wastes; Water pollution monitoring; Water

samples; Contaminants; Toxicity; Analytical methods; Analytical

procedures; Filtration; Waste materials; Fishes; Overburden; Mine

tailings; Eh; pH

Clear Lake; Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine; Lake County(California)

68D Environmental Pollution & Control: Water Pollution &

Control; 57Y Medicine & Biology: Toxicology; 48A Natural Resources

& Earth Sciences: Mineral Industries

Abstract: Clear Lake in northern California has received inputs of mercury (Hg) mining wastes from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM). About 1.2 million tons of Hg-contaminated overburden and mine tailings were distributed over a 50-ha surface area due to mining operations from 1865 to 1957 (Gerlach et al., 2001). The SBMM includes an open, unlined mine pit, Herman Pit, which covers approximately 23 acres and is 750 feet up gradient of Clear Lake. Reynolds et al. (1997) analyzed water samples collected from Herman Pit and Clear Lake and reported the pH values at those locations as 3 and 8, respectively. The SBMM was placed on the Final National Priorities List (NPL) list in 1990. The site has been under investigation as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site and has experienced some minor corrective actions. Clear Lake remains under a fish advisory due to the mercury contamination.

Notes: mine; clear lake; chemistry

Performer: Battelle, Columbus, OH.; Cincinnati Univ., OH. Sponsor: National Risk Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH. 27 Sep 2001. 24p. Report: EPA/600/R-02/032

Prepared in cooperation with Cincinnati Univ., OH. Sponsored by National Risk Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH.

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 336

Author: W. A. A. J. C. Dill

Year: 1997

Title: History And Status of Introduced Fishes In California, 1871 – 1996

Institution: California Department of Fish and Game

Document Number: 178

Pages: 414

Short Title: History And Status of Introduced Fishes In California, 1871 – 1996

Keywords: Introduced fishes -- California

Animal introduction -- California -- History

Fish stocking -- California -- History

Abstract: Unlike previous histories on the subject (the last being in 1976), this one is fully documented by primary references to the original publication or other sources. There are also explanations as to why some of the previous errors occurred.

 

The detailed history of each introduction, including the primary references, is given. The subsequent history and status of each species in California is given. The attitude of administrators, ichthyologists, fish culturists, fishery biologists, fishermen, and the public toward each introduction is given, and there is a discussion of their value. There is, with respect to California, a review of the present regulations concerning introduced fishes, and a prognostication of the future concerning them.

 

Approximately 111 full species of freshwater and euryhaline fishes occur in California. (Salton Sea fishes are excluded.) of these, 53 have been introduced from without the state and have been established successfully. Another five subspecies or races have become established. Twelve introduced fishes have uncertain status. Thirty-nine, including one marine fish which was deliberately introduced, have achieved no lasting success. Eight introduced fishes are listed as "hypothetical." Five were scheduled for introduction, but the introductions were never completed. Three species have been listed erroneously in scientific papers as having been introduced. About 26 other species have been formally suggested as introductions. Three species are likely candidates for introduction.

 

Notes: ONLINE; fish

URL: http://content.cdlib.org/xtf/view?docId=kt8p30069f&query=&brand=calisphere

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 337

Author: C. D. Doley

Year: 1999

Title: Community-Based Habitat Restoration Program

Short Title: Community-Based Habitat Restoration Program

ISBN: 0933957246

Accession Number: 4684092

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: Coastal zone management; Fishery management;

Fishways; Habitat improvement (physical); Nature conservation

Marine

Q2 02123 Conservation; O 6060 Coastal Zone Resources and Management;

Q5 01523 Conservation, wildlife management and recreation

Abstract: The Restoration Center is working to forge closer ties between NOAA and local constituencies. In FY96, the Restoration Center began a community-based restoration initiative to enable staff to become more directly involved in local habitat restoration activities that benefit NOAA trust resources. To date, this effort provided funds for 20 habitat restoration projects at the local or community level, where the Center participation served as a catalyst or essential element for project implementation. Through community-based restorations, the Center hopes to form strong partnerships with local government agencies and volunteer organizations, as well as promote stewardship and a community conservation ethic for natural resources. The Adobe Creek Fish Passage Project in California is an example of community-based partnership in which a permanent step-pool fish ladder system was constructed to provide passage for steelhead trout past a 12 foot blockage at the base of a culvert. The project involved a partnership with the United Anglers of Casa Grande, California Department of Fish and Game, and three Sonoma County Agencies. This solution makes it possible for fish to ascend the perched culvert and continue swimming upstream to spawn.

Notes: tributary; fish; hitch

PROCEEDINGS OF OCEANS '99. VOLUME 1. p. 409.

Mts/ieee

Oceans '99, Seattle, WA (USA), 13-16 Sep 1999

Available from: The Marine Technology Society, 1828 L. St., N.W., Suite 906, Washington, DC 20036, USA.

Book Monograph; Conference

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 338

Author: P. Drucker

Year: 1948

Title: Appraisal of the archeological resources of Kelsey Creek reservoir, Lake County, California

Series Title: Appraisal of the archeological resources ... ;; no. 9

Place Published: Washington D.C.

Number of Pages: 4 l. fold. map. 27 cm.

Short Title: Appraisal of the archeological resources of Kelsey Creek reservoir, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 80390498 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - HARVARD UNIV, TOZZER LIBR

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: tributary; archaeological

Mimeographed./ "Prepared by Pacific Coast area ... ". More Records: Show record information

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 339

Author: K. S. S. Dybeck

Year: 1995

Title: A survey of plant life, Rodman Slough, Clear Lake

Place Published: [California?

Publisher: s.n.

Number of Pages: [16], 30 leaves

Short Title: A survey of plant life, Rodman Slough, Clear Lake

Accession Number: OCLC: 46541440 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 581.9794 DYBECK Lakeport Lib, Redbud Lib, Middletown Lib, Upper Lake Lib; QK149 D93 1995 Regional Coll. 3rd floor  Sonoma State lib use only

 

LC: QK149

Keywords: Botany -- California -- Rodman Slough.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: botany; tributary

ill. ; 28 cm.

Cover title./ Includes bibliographical references (leaves [10-12]) and index.

Kathy Dybeck & Susan Sahl.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 340

Author: C. A. Eagles-Smith

Year: 2006

Title: Mercury in fish: Food web structure, trophic transfer, and bioaccumulation in two California lakes

Place Published: United States -- California

University: University of California, Davis

Thesis Type: Ph.D.

Short Title: Mercury in fish: Food web structure, trophic transfer, and bioaccumulation in two California lakes

Accession Number: 3250788

Keywords: Ecology

Environmental science

Freshwater ecology

Abstract: Mercury contamination of aquatic habitats results in bioaccumulation in fishes to levels that threaten ecosystem function. For my dissertation research I explore how factors such as foraging habitat and temporal variability in food web structure can influence mercury concentrations in freshwater fish. In Chapter 1 I analyze diets of six fish species from a mine-impacted lake and show that mercury trophic transfer is positively related to the degree of profundal foraging. Further, I show that energy from pelagic autotrophs drives the benthic transfer of mercury to fishes, suggesting that pelagic detritus can be strongly coupled with benthic mercury accumulation. Next, in Chapter 2 I use 20 years of monitoring data and archived fish samples to assess how a nonnative fish invasion affected food web structure and mercury accumulation in Clear Lake, California. I demonstrate that the invasion of a planktivorous fish resulted in a dramatic decline in pelagic prey densities, causing an energetic shift among fish to greater benthic reliance. Concomitant with this diet shift, mercury concentrations increased in fish that previously foraged on pelagic prey. Moreover, both diet and mercury concentrations returned to pre-invasion benchmarks following the planktivore's collapse. Thus, transient perturbations to a food web can shifts foraging habitats which can strongly determine mercury levels in fishes. Lastly, in Chapter 3 I examine how mercury concentrations vary in the food web of Eagle Lake, California and use an information theoretic approach to determine important variables determining mercury concentrations in fish. I show that fish length, date, pelagic reliance, and trophic position are all important but the rankings of importance differ among species. Overall, my dissertation highlights the need to incorporate the temporally dynamic energy-flow paradigm of food webs, rather than a static topological approach to understand mercury bioaccumulation in fishes. I show that foraging habitat can be as important as trophic position and that mercury concentrations can respond rapidly to transient food web perturbations. Thus, simplifying assumptions regarding temporal stability, and the direction and magnitude of energy flow can lead to spurious interpretation.

Notes: fish; algae; clear lake; ONLINE

 

-           Pg 3

- Foraging habitat determines [Hg]

-           Pg 4

- When shad are present [Hg] increases in other fish bc shad eat all pelagic prey therefore others must eat more benthic prey which contains more Hg

-           Pg 9

- Older fish and top predators have highest [Hg]

-           Pg 10

- Depends on what they eat

    - Linkages with +/- contaminated prey

-           Pg 23

- Bioaccumulation influenced by foraging habit and trophic position, increasing with degree of benthic foraging and trophic position

-           Pg 24

- Sediment samples near mine have higher [Hg]

-           Pg 62

- 1988-shad dominate

- 1990-shad crash

- 1997-shad detected in lake

- winter 1997-shad die off

- 2001-2002-shad begin to increase appreciably

- shad affects on biomass and population of LMB, bluegill and prickly Sculpin

-           Pg 64

- Zooplankton levels decrease quickly when silversides introduced

- Spiked when silversides disappeared followed by low densities in 1990’s

- 2000-2001- increase density

- 2002-decreae density as silverside increase

- changes in silverside, bluegill, LMB diets when shad present

    - increase benthic invertebrates, decrease zooplankton

-           Pg 66

- Shad result in temporary increase in [Hg] on small fish

-           Pg 67

- No affect on prickly Sculpin (obligatory benthic feeders)

- Other fish greatly reduced zooplankton density and biomass

- Great table regarding these topics

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1276394151&Fmt=7&clientId=1567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?vinst=PROD&fmt=6&startpage=-1&clientid=1567&vname=PQD&RQT=309&did=1276394151&scaling=FULL&vtype=PQD&rqt=309&TS=1216054931&clientId=1567

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 468

Author: C. A. Eagles-Smith, Thomas H. Suchanek, Arthur E. Colwell, Norman L. Anderson & Peter B. Moyle

Year: 2007

Title: Changes in Fish Diets and Mercury Bioaccumulation in Clear Lake, California: Effects of an Invasive Planktivorous Fish

Journal: Ecological Applications

Short Title: Changes in Fish Diets and Mercury Bioaccumulation in Clear Lake, California: Effects of an Invasive Planktivorous Fish

Keywords: mercury, invasive species, invasions, non-native fishes, threadfin shad, inland silverside, largemouth bass, fish, bioaccumulation, stable isotopes

Abstract: The invasion, boom, collapse, and reestablishment of a population of the planktivorous threadfin shad in Clear Lake, California, were documented over a 20 year period, as were the effects of changing shad populations on diet and mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation in nearshore fishes. Threadfin shad competitively displaced other planktivorous fish in the lake, such as inland silversides, young-of-year (YOY) largemouth bass, and YOY bluegill by reducing zooplankton abundance. As a result, all three species shifted from a diet that was dominated by zooplankton to one that was almost entirely zoobenthos. Stable carbon isotopes corroborated this pattern with each species becoming approximately 3% enriched in δ^13 C, which is elevated in benthic versus pelagic organisms. Concomitant with these changes, Hg concentrations roughly doubled in all three species. In contrast, obligate benthivores such as prickly sculpin showed no relationship between diet or δ^13 C and the presence of threadfin shad, suggesting that effects of the shad were not strongly linked to the benthic fish community. There were also no changes in Hg concentrations of prickly sculpin. The temporary extirpation of threadfin shad from the lake resulted in zooplankton densities, foraging patterns, isotope ratios, and Hg concentrations in pelagic fishes returning to pre-shad values. These results indicate that even transient perturbations of the structure of freshwater food-webs can result in significant alterations in the bioaccumulation of Hg and that food webs in lakes cam be highly resilient.

Notes: food web; fish; algae

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 469

Author: C. A. Eagles-Smith, Thomas H. Suchanek, Arthur E. Colwell & Norman L. Anderson

Year: 2007

Title: Mercury trophic transfer in a eutrophic lake: the importance of habitat-specific foraging

Journal: Ecological Applications

Short Title: Mercury trophic transfer in a eutrophic lake: the importance of habitat-specific foraging

Keywords: mercury, trophic transfer, foraging habitat, diet analysis, bioaccumulation, stable isotopes, food webs

Abstract: Mercury (Hg) trophic transfer and bioaccumulation in fish from a mine-impacted, eutrophic lake were examined in relation to foraging habitat, trophic position, and size. Diet analysis indicated that there were clear ontogenetic shifts in foraging habitats and trophic position. Pelagic diet decreased and benthic diet increased with increasing fish length in bluegill, black crappie, inland silverside, and largemouth bass, whereas there was no shift for prickly sculpin or threadfin shad. Stable carbon isotope values (δ^13 C) were inversely related to proportion of pelagic prey items in the diet, but there was no clear relationship with benthic foraging. There were distinct differences between pelagic and benthic prey basal δ^13 C values, with a range of ca. -28% in pelagic zooplankton to ca. -20% in benthic caddisflies. Profundal prey such as chironomid larvae had intermediate δ^13 C values of approximately -24%, reflecting the influence of pelagic detrital subsidies and suppressing the propagation of the benthic carbon isotope signal up the food chain. Fish total mercury (THg) concentrations varied with habitat-specific foraging, trophic position and size; however, the relationships differed among species and ages. When corrected for species, length, and trophic position, THg and δ^13m C were positively correlated, indicating that Hg trophic transfer is linked to benthic foraging. When examined on a species specific basis, THg was positively correlated with δ^13 C only for bluegill, largemouth bass, and threadfin shad. However, diet-based multiple regression analyses suggested that THg also increased with benthic foraging for inland silverside and black crappie. In both species, benthic prey items were dominated by chironomid larvae, explaining the discrepancy with δ^13 C. These results illustrate the importance foraging habitat to Hg bioaccumulation, and indicate that pelagic carbon can strongly subsidize the basal energy sources of benthic organisms.

Notes: food web; fish; algae; pollution

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 538

Author: C. A. Eagles-Smith, T. H. Suchanek, A. E. Colwell and N. L. Anderson

Year: 2008

Title: MERCURY TROPHIC TRANSFER IN A EUTROPHIC LAKE: THE IMPORTANCE OF HABITAT-SPECIFIC FORAGING

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: A196-A212

Short Title: MERCURY TROPHIC TRANSFER IN A EUTROPHIC LAKE: THE IMPORTANCE OF HABITAT-SPECIFIC FORAGING

DOI: doi:10.1890/06-1476.1

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/06-1476.1

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 540

Author: C. A. Eagles-Smith, T. H. Suchanek, A. E. Colwell, N. L. Anderson and P. B. Moyle

Year: 2008

Title: CHANGES IN FISH DIETS AND FOOD WEB MERCURY BIOACCUMULATION INDUCED BY AN INVASIVE PLANKTIVOROUS FISH

Journal: Ecological Applications

Volume: 18

Issue: sp8

Pages: A213-A226

Short Title: CHANGES IN FISH DIETS AND FOOD WEB MERCURY BIOACCUMULATION INDUCED BY AN INVASIVE PLANKTIVOROUS FISH

DOI: doi:10.1890/06-1415.1

URL: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/06-1415.1

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 341

Author: R. A. Elbert

Year: 1996

Title: Reproductive performance and mercury exposure of birds at Clear Lake, CA

Number of Pages: 75 leaves

Date: 1996

Thesis Type: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19990301

Short Title: Reproductive performance and mercury exposure of birds at Clear Lake, CA

Accession Number: OCLC: 40880910 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1996 E462 Shields UCD micro copy collections and special collections

Abstract: In the last century, mining activities in many areas have increased the likelihood of exposure to excessive amounts of mercury compounds through the release of previously hidden, naturally occurring mercury (cinnabar). An abandoned mercury mine site at Clear Lake. Lake County, CA has caused greatly elevated amounts of mercury in the sediments near the mine site (Suchanek, et al., 1993; Chamberlin, et al., 1990). Fish accumulate high concentrations of mercury (Suchanek. et al., 1993). Fish-eating (piscivorous) birds are exposed mainly via consumption of this contaminated food and the subsequent bioconcentration of mercury by partitioning phenomena; piscivorous birds therefore offer good bioindicators of mercury exposure. However, Clear Lake also has many other factors that could affect survival, behavior, and reproduction of birds.

 

This study focuses on Clear Lake (high levels of mercury) and two other study sites (Eagle Lake and Tule Lake with lower levels of mercury), each of whid'1 ext1ibits different combinations of environmental stressors. The wildlife of Clear Lake may be exhibiting Icwer reproductive output than the other two lakes because of the combination of stressors. Eagle Lake and Tule Lake, have a different combination of environmental stressors. This paper examines the possibility that mercury is causing or exacerbating reproductive problems of piscivorous birds at Clear Lake.

 

Part I of this report is a literature review on the dynamics and effects of mercury in birds, as an introduction to understanding mercury as an environmental contaminant. Possible effects of mercury will be addressed along with an evaluation of levels that may cause those effects. Part II describes the field study results, as well as pertinent conclusions.

Notes: chemistry; pollution; birds; clear lake; bioaccumulation

ill. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Davis, 1996.

Degree granted in Ecology.

by Ruth Anne Elbert.

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss)

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 342

Author: R. A. Elbert and D. W. Anderson

Year: 1998

Title: Mercury levels, reproduction, and hematology in western grebes from three California lakes, USA

Journal: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry

Volume: 17

Issue: 2

Pages: 210-213

Date: Feb

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Mercury levels, reproduction, and hematology in western grebes from three California lakes, USA

ISSN: 0730-7268

Accession Number: ISI:000071690700012

Keywords: western grebe; mercury; Clear Lake; phosphorus; potassium

Abstract: Twenty-three healthy adult western and Clark's grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis and Aechmophorus clarkii) were collected at three study sites in California, USA, in 1992: Clear Lake, Lake County; Eagle Lake, Lassen County; and Tule Lake, Siskiyou County. Liver, kidney, breast muscle, and brain were analyzed for total mercury (Hg) concentration (ppm wet weight), and blood was analyzed for various blood parameters. Clear Lake birds (n = 13) had greater Hg concentrations in kidney, breast muscle, and brain than birds from the other two lakes (p < 0.05), whereas liver concentrations were not statistically different (p > 0.05). Average concentrations for Clear Lake birds were 2.74 ppm for liver, 2.06 ppm for kidney, 1.06 ppm for breast muscle, and 0.28 ppm for brain. The tissue levels of kidney, breast muscle, and brain at the other two study sites were one half the levels found at Clear Lake. These mean tissue levels were near, but below, those known to cause adverse effects. When data from all sites were merged. kidney, breast muscle, and brain concentrations are positively correlated to each other (p < 0.05). Liver concentrations were not correlated to any other value. Brain Hg concentrations were also negatively correlated to blood potassium and blood phosphorus levels (n = 11, p < 0.05). Kidney Hg levels were positively correlated to percent blood heterophils and negatively correlated to percent eosinophils (n = 13, p < 0.05), suggesting that mercury levels might be affecting immune function. These biomarkers could not be related to any obvious ecological effects.

Notes: birds; bioaccumulation; chemistry; pollution; ONLINE

URL: <Go to ISI>://000071690700012

http://www.setacjournals.org/archive/1552-8618/17/2/pdf/i1552-8618-17-2-210.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 343

Author: J. J. Elser, H. J. Carney and C. R. Goldman

Year: 1990

Title: The zooplankton-phytoplankton interface in lakes of contrasting trophic status: An experimental comparison

Series Editor: R. D. Gulati, E. Lammens, M. L. Meijer and E. Donk

Short Title: The zooplankton-phytoplankton interface in lakes of contrasting trophic status: An experimental comparison

ISBN: 0018-8158

Accession Number: 3651819

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: biomass; eutrophic lakes; grazing;

phytoplankton; population density; trophic relationships; zooplankton;

Article Taxonomic Terms: Daphnia; Article Geographic Terms: USA,

California

biomanipulation

Freshwater

Q1 01461 Plankton; Q5 01521 Mechanical and natural changes

Abstract: We report here the results of an experimental study designed to compare algal responses to short-term manipulations of zooplankton in three California lakes which encompass a broad range of productivity (ultra-oligotrophic Lake Tahoe, mesotrophic Castle Lake, and strongly eutrophic Clear Lake). To assess the potential strength of grazing in each lake, we evaluated algal responses to a 16-fold range of zooplankton biomass. To better compare algal responses among lakes, we determined algal responses to grazing by a common grazer (Daphnia sp.) over a range of Daphnia densities from 1 to 16 animals per liter. Effects of both ambient grazers and Daphnia were strong in Castle Lake. However, neither ambient zooplankton nor Daphnia had much impact on phytoplankton in Clear Lake. In Lake Tahoe, no grazing impacts could be demonstrated for the ambient zooplankton but Daphnia grazing had dramatic effects. These results indicate weak coupling between phytoplankton and zooplankton in Clear Lake and Lake Tahoe, two lakes which lie near opposite extremes of lake trophic status for most lakes. These observations, along with work reported by other researchers, suggest that linkages between zooplankton and phytoplankton may be weak in lakes with either extremely low or high productivity. Biomanipulation approaches to recover hypereutrophic lakes which aim only to alter zooplankton size structure may be less effective if algal communities are dominated by large, inedible phytoplankton taxa. (DBO)

Notes: algae

BIOMANIPULATION -- TOOL FOR WATER MANAGEMENT. pp. 69-82. Hydrobiologia. Vol. 200-201.

Conf. on Biomanipulation, Tool for Water Management, Amsterdam (Netherlands), 8-11 Aug 1989

Book Monograph; Conference

Author Address: Grad. Group in Ecol., Div. Environ. Stud., Univ. California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 344

Author: R. A. Elston

Year: 1975

Title: Ontogeny of size selective predation and feeding habits of the Mississippi silverside, Menidia audens, in Clear Lake, California

Place Published: [Davis

Publisher: Calif.]

Number of Pages: 284 l. illus. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Davis.

Short Title: Ontogeny of size selective predation and feeding habits of the Mississippi silverside, Menidia audens, in Clear Lake, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 81846615 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1975E58 Shields UCD special collections

Keywords: Dissertations, Academic -- California -- Ecology.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; clear lake

Thesis/dissertation (deg)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 345

Author: M. A. Engle, F. Goff, D. G. Jewett, G. J. Reller and J. B. Bauman

Year: 2008

Title: Application of environmental groundwater tracers at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, California, USA

Journal: Hydrogeology Journal

Volume: 16

Issue: 3

Pages: 559-573

Date: May

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Application of environmental groundwater tracers at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, California, USA

Alternate Journal: Hydrogeol. J.

ISSN: 1431-2174

Accession Number: ISI:000255032600012

Keywords: groundwater flow; stable isotopes; water budget; USA; hydrochemistry

CLEAR LAKE; WATERS; POLLUTION; GEYSERS; BORON

Abstract: Boron, chloride, sulfate, delta D, delta O-18, and H-3 concentrations in surface water and groundwater samples from the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM), California, USA were used to examine geochemical processes and provide constraints on evaporation and groundwater flow. SBMM is an abandoned sulfur and mercury mine with an underlying hydrothermal system, adjacent to Clear Lake, California. Results for non-H-3 tracers (i.e., boron, chloride, sulfate, delta D, and delta O-18) identify contributions from six water types at SBMM. Processes including evaporation, mixing, hydrothermal water input and possible isotopic exchange with hydrothermal gases are also discerned. Tritium data indicate that hydrothermal waters and other deep groundwaters are likely pre-bomb (before similar to 1952) in age while most other waters were recharged after similar to 1990. A boron-based steady-state reservoir model of the Herman Impoundment pit lake indicates that 71-79% of its input is from meteoric water with the remainder from hydrothermal contributions. Results for groundwater samples from six shallow wells over a 6-month period for delta D and delta O-18 suggests that water from Herman Impoundment is diluted another 3% to more than 40% by infiltrating meteoric water, as it leaves the site. Results for this investigation show that environmental tracers are an effective tool to understand the SBMM hydrogeologic regime.

Notes: ONLINE; mine

 

-           Pg 560

- Max dissolved groundwater [Hg] exceed EPA max contaminent level (20 micrograms per liter) by more than 2 orders of magnitude (Jewtt et al 2000a)

- Hg is seen as MeHg

- 1990-SBMM becomes superfund site

- “metals and acid released for oxidation of sulfide materials during water-rock interaction in the mine waste and hydrothermally alters rocks impact surface and groundwater” (Suchanek et al 2000, Jewett 2006b)

- Hg-emitting thermal reservoir alters water quality (White and Roberson 1962)

-           Pg 561

- Mine at intersection of 3 faults

- Upwelling hydrothermal fluids deposited Hg and S altered minerals

- 1864-1957-mined for S then Hg

- pit filled with hydrothermal fluids, meteoric groundwater, surface water runoff (White and Roberson 1962)

- 1950’s-waste rock dam built to decrease flows to CL

URL: <Go to ISI>://000255032600012

http://www.springerlink.com/content/c66404546n4303r2/fulltext.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Online Multimedia

Record Number: 474

Created By: EPA

Year: 1999,October

Title: Interim construction work begins at Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine superfund site

Date Accessed: August 27, 2008

Type of Work: Fact Sheet

Notes: mine; ONLINE

URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r9/sfund/r9sfdocw.nsf/3dc283e6c5d6056f88257426007417a2/c000880de6ae67ff882570070063c2d4/$FILE/SBnk1099.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Online Multimedia

Record Number: 475

Created By: EPA

Year: 2000, October-November

Title: EPA is closing geothermal wells near the Herman Pit

Date Accessed: August 27, 2008

Type of Work: Fact Sheet

Notes: mine; ONLINE

URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r9/sfund/r9sfdocw.nsf/3dc283e6c5d6056f88257426007417a2/09948528f0aefa66882570070063c350/$FILE/sbmm%2011_00.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Online Multimedia

Record Number: 476

Created By: EPA

Year: 2006, June-October

Title: FAQs Elem Indian colony mine waste removal action

Date Accessed: August 27, 2008

Type of Work: Fact Sheet

Notes: mine; ONLINE

URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r9/sfund/r9sfdocw.nsf/3dc283e6c5d6056f88257426007417a2/5d11901e8792044988257195002bfe52/$FILE/Sulphur%20Bank%206_06%20118kb.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Online Multimedia

Record Number: 477

Created By: EPA

Year: 2007, February

Title: Cleanup progress update: Elem Indian Colony mine waste removal action

Date Accessed: August 27, 2008

Type of Work: Fact Sheet

Notes: mine; ONLINE

URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r9/sfund/r9sfdocw.nsf/3dc283e6c5d6056f88257426007417a2/f3c844a609ba12288825729d002bf6cb/$FILE/SulphurBank2_07%20549kb.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Web Page

Record Number: 470

Author: EPA

Year: 2008

Title: Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine

Publisher: EPA

Access Year: 2008

Access Date: August 27, 2008

Short Title: Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine

Notes: mine; ONLINE

URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r9/sfund/r9sfdocw.nsf/vwsoalphabetic/Sulphur+Bank+Mercury+Mine?OpenDocument

 

 

Reference Type:  Online Multimedia

Record Number: 478

Created By: EPA

Year: 2008, January

Title: Sulphur Bank Mine road: removal action

Date Accessed: August 27, 2008

Type of Work: Fact Sheet

Notes: mine; ONLINE

URL: http://yosemite.epa.gov/r9/sfund/r9sfdocw.nsf/3dc283e6c5d6056f88257426007417a2/fe96a433b68e0ecb882573de00700d9a/$FILE/SulphurBank1_08%2069kb.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 346

Author: B. W. a. H. W. C. Evermann

Year: 1931

Title: A distributional list of the species of freshwater fishes known to occur in California

Journal: DIVISION OF FISH AND GAME OF CALIFORNIA

Volume: 35

Date: 1931

Short Title: A distributional list of the species of freshwater fishes known to occur in California

Notes: fish; html online

URL: http://content.cdlib.org/xtf/view?docId=kt7f59n8qw&brand=calisphere&doc.view=entire_text

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 500

Author: U. Fehn, E. K. Peters, S. Tullai-Fitzpatrick, P. W. Kubik and P. Sharma

Year: 1992

Title: 129-I and 36-Cl Concentrations in Waters of the Eastern Clear Lake Area, California: Residence Times and Source Ages of Hydrothermal Fluids

Short Title: 129-I and 36-Cl Concentrations in Waters of the Eastern Clear Lake Area, California: Residence Times and Source Ages of Hydrothermal Fluids

Accession Number: 9210157

Keywords: *Geochemistry; *Groundwater dating; *Residence time; *Groundwater

chemistry; *Iodine radioisotopes; *Chlorine radioisotopes; Clear Lake;

*California; *Geothermal waters; Gold; Silver; *Hot springs; Mineral

springs; Meteoric water; Uranium; Thorium

SW 0840 Groundwater; SW 0850 Lakes

Abstract: The Clear Lake area of northern California is the location of hot spring activity, some of which is associated with the formation of Au and Hg deposits. 129-I/I and 36-Cl/Cl ratios were measured in nine warm springs (formation springs), six cold springs with elevated levels of Cl and I (mineral springs), and five springs of recent meteoric origin. Dating of the I in the formation waters indicated that sources of I in these waters are formations with minimum ages between 60 and 80 Ma. This age range is in good agreement with the ages of the Franciscan Complex and the Great Valley Sequence, the dominant formations in this area. Because the mineral waters are essentially formation waters diluted with meteoric water, I in these waters is of the same origin. Residence times of the waters were calculated based on the build-up of 129-I and 36-Cl as a consequence of the presence of U and Th in the crust. The residence time of the formation waters in the Great Valley Sequence, the location for most of these springs, was probably not longer than 84,000 yr. The concentrations found for 36-Cl and 129-I in the mineral waters indicate that these waters have residence times of similar magnitude in formations such as the Franciscan Complex or the Clear Lake Volcanics, which have slightly higher levels of U and Th than the Great Valley Sequence. (Author's abstract)

Notes: geochemistry; clear lake

Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta GCACAK, Vol. 56, No. 5, p 2069-2079, May 1992. 17 fig, 1 tab, 50 ref. NSF Grant Nos. EAR-8617715 and EAR-8803803.

Author Address: Department of Geological Sciences, Univ. of Rochester, Rochester , NY

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 347

Reporter: P. Fisher

Year: 2004

Title: Interior Secratary Announces $9 Million in Grants to Tribes to Help Fund Fish and Wildlife Conservation Projects

Newspaper: US Fed News-Hindustan Times

Issue Date: August 26, 2004

Short Title: Interior Secratary Announces $9 Million in Grants to Tribes to Help Fund Fish and Wildlife Conservation Projects

Abstract: WASHINGTON, Aug. 26 -- The U.S. Department of the Interior's U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service issued the following press release: Interior Secretary Gale Norton today announced that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is awarding 53 grants, totaling nearly $9 million, to help 48 federally recognized Indian tribes conserve and recover endangered, threatened and at-risk species and other wildlife on tribal lands in 22 states.

 

* Clear Lake Hitch Study and Recovery Project - (Robinson Rancheria of Pomo Indians)- ($249,511) This grant supports efforts to establish a three part study and recovery program for the benefit of the Clear Lake Hitch, a culturally significant species endemic to Clear Lake in partnership with the Lake County Public Works Department.

Notes: native american; grant

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 348

Author: E. J. Fleming, E. E. Mack, P. G. Green and D. C. Nelson

Year: 2006

Title: Mercury methylation from unexpected sources: Molybdate-inhibited freshwater sediments and an iron-reducing bacterium

Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Volume: 72

Issue: 1

Pages: 457-464

Date: Jan

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Mercury methylation from unexpected sources: Molybdate-inhibited freshwater sediments and an iron-reducing bacterium

ISSN: 0099-2240

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV200600206976

Abstract: Methylmercury has been thought to be produced predominantly by sulfate-reducing bacteria in anoxic sediments. Here we show that in circumneutral pH sediments (Clear Lake, CA) application of a specific inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria at appropriate concentrations typically inhibited less than one-half of all anaerobic methylation of added divalent mercury. This suggests that one or more additional groups of microbes are active methylators in these sediments impacted by a nearby abandoned mercury mine. From Clear Lake sediments, we isolated the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sp. strain CLFeRE, which can methylate mercury at a rate comparable to Desulfobulbus propionicus strain 1pr3, a sulfate-reducing bacterium known to be an active methylator. This is the first time that an iron-reducing bacterium has been shown to methylate mercury at environmentally significant rates. We suggest that mercury methylation by iron-reducing bacteria represents a previously unidentified and potentially significant source of this environmental toxin in iron-rich freshwater sediments.

Notes: mine; clear lake; pollution; chemistry; ONLINE

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV200600206976

http://aem.asm.org/cgi/reprint/72/1/457

Author Address: Nelson, Douglas C.; Univ Calif Davis, Microbiol Sect, 357 Briggs Hall, Davis, CA 95616 USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 349

Author: B. A. Follansbee

Year: 1996

Title: Wetland restoration at Clear Lake, California : species selection, phosphorous monitoring, and coordinated resource management planning

Number of Pages: 106 leaves

Date: 1996

Thesis Type: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19990302

Short Title: Wetland restoration at Clear Lake, California : species selection, phosphorous monitoring, and coordinated resource management planning

Accession Number: OCLC: 40889906 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1996 F659 Shields UCD micro copy collections and special collections

Abstract: Chapter 1 - The effect of Azolla filliculoides (Azfi) on the nutrient budgets of Scirpus acutus, S. tuberosus. and Typha latifolia was investigated using mesocosms and a mass balance approach. Nutrient levels remained low throughout the experiment because no added nutrients were used and the macrophytes placed heavy demands on the available nutrient pools. Azfi productivity and hence N contribution to the system was severely limited under the oligotrophic conditions. The three emergent macrophyte species: 1) produced significantly different quantities of biomass based on their colonizing abilities and growth characteristics, 2) had significantly different root:shoot ratios, and 3) had significantly different tissue content of N and P. The mass balance analysis along with the other analyses indicated that the significant differences between macrophyte species in nutrient uptake, nutrient partitioning, resource allocation and biomass were due to the growth characteristics of the macrophytes. The addition of Azfi produced only limited changes in these parameters.

 

Chapter 2 - Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) were used for measuring soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) in sediments of Clear Lake, CA. The results of AEM sampling were correlated with the results of the dilute-acid Truog's P extraction and a sequential P extraction (NH.CI, NaOH, HCI, and total). AEMs were also used to measure the relative quantities of SRP at five paired lakeshore sites with and without Scirpus acutus. A method for inserting AEMs in situ to measure deep lakebed sediment SRP was developed. The only significant correlation was between the NaOH extraction and the AEM results (r2=0.835, P<0.0001). The negative correlation indicates that as the amount of iron- and aluminum-bound P decreases, more SRP is adsorbed by the AEMs.

 

Chapter 3 - The Coordinated Resource Management and Planning (CRMP) process is being used in Lake County by a group of government agency and citizen group representatives to formulate long term, integrated and sustainable solutions to a variety of environmental problems. The group makes recommendations for implementing those solutions to the county Board of Supervisors. Examples of changes in policy and regulations, and restoration projects that are specifically related to the authors research are presented

Notes: clear lake; pollution

ill. Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Davis, 1996.

Degree granted in Ecology.

by Bruce Allen Follansbee.

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss)

 

-pg 2

            -environmental impacts at clear lake

                        -erosion and transport to the lake of solids. Extra phosphorus and iron resulted in eutrophy and cyanophyte blooms

                                    -eutrophy occurs in spring, summer, fall

                                                -when they die, tons of nitrogen rich materials produced

                                                -oxygen in the water column is dpleted resulting in fish kills

                        -DDD applications

                        -mercury and arsenic via Sulphur bank mercury mine

                        -introduction of fishes (sport), decline/extinction of natives

                        -1966-1986, county population tripled

 

 

Reference Type:  Web Page

Record Number: 350

Author: D. H. Fry

Year: 1979

Title: Anadromous fishes of California

Publisher: [Sacramento, Calif.] : Dept. of Fish and Game, Resources Agency

Description: 112 p. : ill. ; 17 cm.

Edition: Rev.

Type of Medium: Book; Internet Resource Date of Entry: 19810109

Short Title: Anadromous fishes of California

Accession Number: OCLC: 7055579 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QL628.C2 F7 1979 Shields UCD

Keywords: Anadromous fishes.

Fishes -- California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

California.; Dept. of Fish and Game.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 104-105) and index./ Also issued online.

LC: SH167.A7; Dewey: 597.09794; GovDoc: F650.A65

by Donald H. Fry. More Records: Show record information

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp); Internet resource (url)

URL: http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/7696

http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/7696 http://www.dfg.ca.gov/nafwb/pubs/anadfish.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 351

Author: C. D. o. F. a. Game

Year: 1973

Title: Warmwater game fishes of California

Publisher: Sacramento : Dept. of Fish and Game

Short Title: Warmwater game fishes of California

Call Number: call # - F650 W34 1973 SSH UCSB Documents California

Keywords: Fishes -- California

Freshwater fishes -- California -- Anderson Marsh.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 352

Author: R. E. Geary

Year: 1978

Title: Life history of the Clear Lake hitch (Lavinia exilcauda chi) typescript, 1978

Number of Pages: v, 27 leaves

Short Title: Life history of the Clear Lake hitch (Lavinia exilcauda chi) typescript, 1978

Accession Number: OCLC: 42376815 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1978 G445 Shields UCD micro copy collections and special collections

 

LC: QL638.C94

Keywords: Cyprinidae -- California -- Clear Lake (Lake County)

Abstract: The life history of the Clear Lake hitch (Lavinia exilicauda) is examined by study of age, growth, size, fecundity, food habits, and spawning behavior. This study is compared with a study of hitch  biology in Beardsley Reservoir and an earlier study of the Clear Lake hitch done in 1947. Growth of Clear Lake hitch has remained about the same in the Clear Lake studies. Both growth and maximum size of Clear Lake hitch are greater than that of Beardsley hitch, as is fecundity. Clear Lake hitch spawn in both the Lake and its tributaries; however, hitch recruitment. comes entirely from stream spawning. Clear Lake hitch less than 50 mm are found inshore, feeding on insects and zooplankton, while fish larger than 50 mm become limnetic and exclusive zooplanktivores.

Notes: hitch

ill., map. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Davis, 1978.

Includes bibliographical references (leaf 27)./ Reproduction: Microfiche./ [Davis, Calif. :/ University Library, University of California, Davis,/ 1978?]./ 1 microfiche : negative.

Clear Lake hitch

by Ralph Eugene Geary.

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Microfiche (mfc)

Book

 

-pg iv

            -hitch spawn in lakes and tributaries but recruitment entirely from streams

            -<50 mm length, inshore feed on insects (36%, pg 24) and zooplankton

            ->50 mm, limnetic eat zooplankton

-pg 1

            -1967, silverside introduced

            -silversides now most abundant species in littoral zone

                        -other species decreased number of juveniles

            -hitch and blackfish (from 20% in 1961-1962 to <1% in 1973 in seine hauls)

-pg 3

            -clear lake tributaries (figure 1)

-pg 25

            -1976, silverside populations low therefore not as much competition

-pg 26

            -shad introduction threatens hitch because they occupy same niche

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 353

Author: R. E. Geary and P. B. Moyle

Year: 1980

Title: Aspects of the Ecology of the Hitch, Lavinia exilicauda (Cyprinidae), a Persistent Native Cyprinid in Clear Lake, California

Volume: 25

Issue: 3

Pages: 385-390

Short Title: Aspects of the Ecology of the Hitch, Lavinia exilicauda (Cyprinidae), a Persistent Native Cyprinid in Clear Lake, California

ISSN: 00384909

PMCID: Copyright © 1980 Southwestern Association of Naturalists

Abstract: Growth, diet, and fecundity of Clear Lake hitch (Lavinia exilicauda chi) were investigated to see if any changes had taken place following the establishment of a large population of Mississippi silversides (Menidia audens) in the lake. No changes were found. Hitch seem to avoid competing with silversides for zooplankton by being limnetic in all except the early life history stages. Fecundity was found to be higher than that of Beardsley Reservoir hitch, but considerably lower than a previous estimate had indicated.

Notes: ONLINE; hitch; fish

ArticleType: primary_article / Full publication date: Nov. 14, 1980 / Copyright © 1980 Southwestern Association of Naturalists

 

-pg 385

            -hitch don’t compete with silversides except in early life stages, otherwise limnetic

            -hitch are one of four natives to persist in clear lake in large numbers since introduction of 16 species

            -small commercial fishery for hitch

            -35 cm long, plankton feeding

            -silversides, small planktivore, dominate shore

-pg 386

            -hitch growth rate same as in 1947

-pg 387

            -young, grow 0.45 mm per day (40 mm) by 80 days

            -fecundity, about 36,000

                        -9,000 (212 mm), 63,000 (312 mm)

-pg 388

            -food

                        -all fish taken from spawning and fish taken in early morning had empty stomachs. Afternoon and evening contained food

                        -19-30 mm, adult and larval chironomids

                        -31-50 mm, Daphnia

                        -50 mm +, become limnetic, Daphnia, zooplankton, adult midges

            -appears hitch and silversides don’t compete much because hitch becomes limnetic before silverside population increases

-pg 389

            -likely become limnetic to avoid competition with splittail and not due to silversides

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3670695

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/3670695.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 354

Author: E. W. Gifford

Year: 1923

Title: Pomo lands on Clear Lake

Series Title: University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology ;; v. 20, no. 5; Variation: University of California publications.; American archaeology and ethnology ;; v. 20, no. 5.

Place Published: Berkeley

Publisher: University of California Press

Number of Pages: p. 77-92

Short Title: Pomo lands on Clear Lake

Accession Number: OCLC: 55015228 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - CILC G53 P6 1923 State Lib CSL

 

LC: E51

Keywords: Pomo Indians.

Clear Lake (Calif. : Township)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: native american

26 cm.

by Edward Winslow Gifford.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 53

Author: C. R. Goldman and R. G. Wetzel

Year: 1963

Title: A Study of Primary Productivity of Clear Lake Lake County, California

Journal: Ecology

Volume: 44

Issue: 2

Pages: 283-&

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: A Study of Primary Productivity of Clear Lake Lake County, California

ISSN: 0012-9658

Accession Number: ISI:A1963P326000010

Notes: ONLINE; clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1963P326000010

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/1932175.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 355

Author: E. C. Haderlie

Year: 1948

Title: A preliminary survey of the internal helminth parasites of some Clear Lake fishes

Place Published: [Berkeley

Publisher: Calif.

Number of Pages: [2], 94 l. illus., map. 28 cm. Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--Univ. of California, June 1948.

Short Title: A preliminary survey of the internal helminth parasites of some Clear Lake fishes

Accession Number: OCLC: 25545817 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 308t.H128 NRLF C 2 891 602

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; clear lake

"Literature cited": p. 80-94. More Records: Show record information

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 356

Author: M. Harnly, Seidel, S., Rojas, P., Fornes, R., Flessel, P., Smith, D., Kreutzer, R. and Goldman, L.

Year: 1997

Title: Biological monitoring for mercury within a community with soil and fish contamination

Journal: Environmental Health Perspectives

Volume: 105

Issue: 4

Pages: 424-429

Date: Apr

Short Title: Biological monitoring for mercury within a community with soil and fish contamination

Alternate Journal: Environ. Health Perspect.

ISSN: 0091-6765

Accession Number: 4105779

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: Pisces; bioaccumulation; bioindicators; blood levels; dust; environmental health; ethnic groups; fish; fish consumption; food organisms; human food; mercury; pisces; pollution indicators; public health; seafood; soil contamination; soil pollution; urine; Article Taxonomic Terms: Pisces; pisces; Article Geographic Terms: USA, California, Clear L. Native Americans; Pisces; bioindicators; blood levels; dust; environmental health; ethnic groups; fish; fish consumption; food organisms; human food; mercury; pisces; pollution indicators; soil contamination; soil pollution Freshwater P 6000 TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH; X 24166 Environmental impact; Q5 01524 Public health, medicines, dangerous organisms; SW 3030 Effects of pollution

Abstract: To assess the impact of elevated levels of inorganic mercury in soil and dust and organic mercury in fish, biological monitoring was conducted among Native Americans living next to an inactive mercury mine in Clear Lake, California. Of resident tribal members, 46% (n = 56) participated in biomonitoring. Urine mercury levels are equivalent to background, indicating that soil and dust exposures among study participants are not substantial. The average blood organic mercury level among study participants is 15.6 plus or minus 8.8 mu g/l (n = 44), which is higher than levels reported by others among those who do not consume fish (2 mu g/l). Consistent with results from other studies, a correlation between fish consumption and blood organic mercury is observed (p = 0.03). The margin between observed and established adverse effect levels for adults is examined for blood organic mercury and found to be less than 10-fold for 20% of the study population. Protective public health efforts for the study population and other similarly exposed populations, notably those who consume commercial fish products, are considered.

Notes: ONLINE; mine; native american; fish

Journal Article

 

-pg 424

            -correlation between fish consumption and blood organic mercury

            -native Americans were the study group

            -high concentrations of mercury in humans can result in death and cerebral palsy

            -1870-1957, cinnabar mined at Sulphur bank mercury mine

            -rancheria soil averages 50 micrograms of mercury per gram

            -8-18% of top predators in clear lake exceed 1 microgram of mercury per gram

            -1992, meetings about mercury contamination raised awareness

-pg 425

            -table, mercury levels by lake and fish

-pg 427

            -inorganic mercury, population is 25 times lower

            -organic mercury

                        -tribal participants are 15.6 micrograms per liter. Higher than others who eat fish (8 micrograms per liter) or those who don’t eat fish (2 micrograms per liter)

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/3433340.pdf

Author Address: Environ. Health Investigations Branch, California Dep. Health Serv., 151 Berkeley Way, Annex 10, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 150

Author: S. P. Hayes, III

Year: 1974

Title: An Evaluation of the Trophic Status of Upper Blue Lake Lower Blue Lake and the Oaks Arm of Clear Lake in Lake County California

Journal: ASB Bulletin

Volume: 21

Issue: 2

Pages: 60

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: An Evaluation of the Trophic Status of Upper Blue Lake Lower Blue Lake and the Oaks Arm of Clear Lake in Lake County California

ISSN: 0001-2386

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV197511074433

Call Number: call # - QH301 .A14 Biosci UCB

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the trophic status of three natural lakes in Lake County, California. From February through October 1972, monthly samples of water (surface, mid-depth, and bottom) were collected from a selected station on each lake and analyzed for temperature, dissolved oxygen, carbon dioxide, orthophosphate, metaphosphate, nitrite nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and phytoplankton and zooplankton. Plankters were classified to genus or species and the numbers per cubic meter of water calculated. Partial correlations were obtained between the number of plankters in each major taxonomic grouping (i.e. Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, Rotatorla, etc.. ) and each water quality measurement. Significant positive correlations were found between measurements of Cyanophyta density and dissolved oxygen, Chlorophyta density and orthophosphates, Bacillariophyceae density and dissolved carbon dioxide, Ciliata density and temperature, and Copepoda density and oxygen. Based on water quality and plankton studies and basin morphology, Upper Blue Lake has the least amount of enrichment, Lower Blue Lake has a slightly greater amount of enrichment, and the Oaks Arm of Clear Lake has the greatest amount of enrichment.

This work was part of the M.S. Thesis presented by the author to the Graduate School, University of the Pacific Stockton, California.

Notes: clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV197511074433

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 24

Author: S. P. Hayes

Year: 1974

Title: A quantitative study of the water quality and plankton of Upper Blue Lake, Lower Blue Lake, and the Oaks Arm of Clear Lake in Lake County, California

Place Published: [Stockton, Calif.]

University: S.P. Hayes

Number of Pages: 90 leaves

Date: 1974

Thesis Type: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19960425

Short Title: A quantitative study of the water quality and plankton of Upper Blue Lake, Lower Blue Lake, and the Oaks Arm of Clear Lake in Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 34630845 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - TD224 .C2 L2 H41 Main Lib archives & stacks UOP

Keywords: Water quality -- California -- Lake County.

Plankton -- California -- Lake County.

Notes: clear lake

ill., map ; 28 cm. Dissertation: Theses (M.S.)--University of the Pacific, 1974.

Includes abstract./ Includes bibliographical references (leaves : 47-50).

Stephen Patrick Hayes.

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss)

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 510

Author: K. Hayhoe, Daniel Cayan, Christopher B. Field, Peter C. Frumhoff, Edwin P. Maurer, Norman L. Miller, Susanne C. Moser, Stephen H. Schneider, Kimberly Nicholas Cahill, Elsa E. Cleland, Larry Dale, Ray Drapek, R. Michael Hanemann, Laurence S. Kalkstein, James Lenihan, Claire K. Lunch, Ronald P. Neilson, Scott C. Sheridan, and Julia H. Verville

Year: 2004

Title: Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California

Journal: PNAS

Volume: 101

Issue: 34

Pages: 12422-12477

Start Page: 12422

Short Title: Emissions pathways, climate change, and impacts on California

Abstract: The magnitude of future climate change depends substantially on the greenhouse gas emission pathways we choose. Here we explore the implications of the highest and lowest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emissions pathways for climate change and associated impacts in California. Based on climate projections from two state-of-the-art climate models with low and medium sensitivity (Parallel Climate Model and Hadley Centre Climate Model, version 3, respectively), we find that annual temperature increases nearly double from the lower B1 to the higher A1fi emissions scenario before 2100. Three of four simulations also show greater increases in summer temperatures as compared with winter. Extreme heat and the associated impacts on a range of temperature-sensitive sectors are substantially greater under the higher emissions scenario, with some interscenario differences apparent before midcentury. By the end of the century under the B1 scenario, heatwaves and extreme heat in Los Angeles quadruple in frequency while heat-related mortality increases two to three times; alpine-subalpine forests are reduced by 50–75%; and Sierra snowpack is reduced 30–70%. Under A1fi, heatwaves in Los Angeles are six to eight times more frequent, with heat-related excess mortality increasing five to seven times; alpine-subalpine forests are reduced by 75–90%; and snowpack declines 73–90%, with cascading impacts on runoff and streamflow that, combined with projected modest declines in winter precipitation, could fundamentally disrupt California’s water rights system. Although interscenario differences in climate impacts and costs of adaptation emerge mainly in the second half of the century, they are strongly dependent on emissions from preceding decades.

Notes: climate

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 357

Author: D. A. Heeraman

Year: 1999

Title: Arsenic and mercury biogeochemistry in relation to revegetation treatments at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, Clear Lake, California

Journal: Dissertation Abstracts International Part B: Science and Engineering

Volume: 60

Issue: 10

Pages: 4979

Date: Apr

Short Title: Arsenic and mercury biogeochemistry in relation to revegetation treatments at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, Clear Lake, California

Alternate Journal: Diss. Abst. Int. Pt. B - Sci. & Eng.

Accession Number: 4756931

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: Arsenic; Bioaccumulation; Biogeochemistry;

Fertilizers; Heavy metals; Liming; Mercury; Mine tailings; Mining;

Organic matter; Plant populations; Pollution effects; Restoration;

Soils; Article Taxonomic Terms: Plantae; Quercus; Vulpia myuros;

Article Geographic Terms: USA, California, Clear L.

Annual Fescue grasses; Oaks

Freshwater

Q5 01503 Characteristics, behavior and fate; Q2 02123 Conservation

Abstract: The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) is an abandoned open pit mine located on the eastern shore of Clear Lake, California where mining operations resulted in deposits of waste material (overburden, tailings) stockpiled along the shoreline. Because of Hg pollution of Clear Lake, SBMM is listed as an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund site. A survey was conducted at SBMM to examine mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) concentrations in plants and sods. Compared to native soil, the waste materials had elevated concentrations of Hg and As. Soils on the bare areas of the overburden material had much higher Hg and As concentrations compared to vegetated areas. However, tissue concentrations of Hg and As in oak and annual grasses were lower than levels considered to cause toxicity in many species. A greenhouse study examined interacting effects of lime, fertilizer and organic matter (OM) additions on soil solution chemistry and As and Hg uptake by Zorro fescue (Vulpia myuros L.). Fescue was grown on three mine-soils from SBMM containing high (164 mg/kg) (S-H), medium (123 mg/kg) (S-M) and low (31 mg/kg) (S-L) As. Mercury in these sods ranged between 1700-3000 mg/kg. Lime and OM additions were negatively correlated with soluble Hg and Hg tissue concentration. Mercury uptake was more strongly related to root length density (RLD) than to soluble Hg indicating that plant root characteristics are an important factor affecting uptake. Compared to total As, extractable As decreased in the order: total-As > oxalate-As > dithionite-As > mixed acid-As > water soluble-As. Oxalate extractable Fe correlated well with total As and As extracted by oxalate, dithionite and mixed acid methods. Soluble As was strongly correlated with soluble P and DOC for the sods. The effect of soluble P on soluble As was much greater in S-H than in S-M or S-L; while the effect of DOC on soluble As was similar in S-H and S-M but considerably lower than in S-L Since the solution phase was undersaturated with respect to possible solid phase As containing solids, adsorption/desorption reactions appear to control solution As in these soils.

Notes: mine; botany; pollution; chemistry; clear lake; soil; ONLINE

Dissertation

Journal Article

 

-           ii

- SBMM on eastern shore of CL

- Due to Hg pollution it’s listed as an EPA superfund site

- Waste materials had elevated Hg, As and Al vs native soils

- Bare soil had higher Hg and As vs vegetated areas

- “tissue [ ]’s of Hg and As in oak and annual grasses lower than toxic levels”

-           Pg 1

- 1957-SBMM abandoned

- S oxidation has resulted in extreme acidity

- Hg and As accumulation due to geothermal activity

-           Pg 2

- 1856-1957-SBMM under operation

    - largest productive hot spring mineral deposit in world, one of largest Hg producers in California (White and Roberson 1994)

- herman impoundment-mine pit, pH=3.0 (US EPA, 1994)

- 1871-end of rail cars hauling surface S deposits away

- native soil was altered during excavations covered with mining waste

    - tailings-reddish, brown or gray (17 acres)

    - overburden-lighter color, clay, silt, sand, boulders, waste from trying to reach richer Hg bearing ore (90 acres)

                           andesite, crystalline HgS (US EPA 1994)

    - undifferentiated-mine waste, tailings, debris (7 acres) (US EPA 1994)

- soil-low fertility, acidic, low organic matter, elevated As and Hg, heterogeneity of surface materials

    - makes revegetation difficult

-           Pg 31

- Lime and fertilizer to help with low fertility and acidity

-           Pg 38

- Soil texture ranges: sand (39-74%), silt (17-40%), clay (8-30%)

-           Pg 40

- N and C: native C=higher than mine soil

   native N=lower than mine soil

-           Pg 42

- Acidity: native pH=6, mine pH=3.4-4.5

-           Pg 132

- revegetation will help prevent erosion

-           Pg 179

- Movement of sediment into CL, erosion, contamination of surrounding areas, health risks

-           Pg 180

- Overburden-lacks Ca, Mg, K, increased N

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=0&did=730218601&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=6&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1216060232&clientId=1567

Author Address: University of California, Davis, CA, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 358

Author: S. G. Herman, R. L. Garret and R. Rudd

Year: 1969

Title: Pesticides and the western grebe: A Study of Pesticide Survival and Trophic Concentration at Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Series Editor: M. W. Miller and G. G. Berg

Short Title: Pesticides and the western grebe: A Study of Pesticide Survival and Trophic Concentration at Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: 5834780

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: Aquatic birds; Biology; Chlorinated hydrocarbons; DDT; Distribution; Feeding; Nesting; Pesticides; Pollutant persistence; Pollution effects; Pollution indicators; Population control; Article Taxonomic Terms: Aechmophorus occidentalis; Article Geographic Terms: USA, California, Clear L. Marine

Q5 01503 Characteristics, behavior and fate

Abstract: One of the best-known examples of trophic concentration of pesticide residues occurs in Clear Lake, California. The entire lacustrine ecosystem contains chlorinated hydrocarbon residues, chiefly of the DDT series. The effects of trophic concentration are most obvious in the Western grebe (Aechmophorus occidentalis), a fish-eating bird, in which both acute mortality and reproductive inhibition, presumably attributable to high residue loads, have combined to cause population declines. This report centers on probable pathways of residue transfer and on the precise manner in which reproduction might be affected. Various aspects of the population biology of the Western grebe and its prey species are described. The breeding population of this colonially nesting species is approximately 150 pairs. Regular aerial censusing shows variation in total numbers throughout the year as well as differential distribution in the lake. Residue loads in grebe tissues have remained relatively high over several years, averaging, as examples, in 1967 in DDD alone 544 ppm (wet weight) in subcutaneous fat, 296 ppm (lipid weight) in eggs, and 546 ppm (lipid weight) in the yolk sacs of hatchling grebes. All fishes contain DDD and other residues. Residues in grebes vary seasonally and appear strongly correlated with feeding rates and selection of prey types. Comparison with another breeding population of grebes at Topaz Lake, California reveals a different distribution and abundance of tissue residues and a different seasonal variability. Maintenance of captive grebes has given precise information on rates of growth and on feeding characteristics. Various components of physiological, biological, and trophic concentration are described in detail. Studies will continue for two additional reproductive seasons.

Notes: birds; bioaccumulation; clear lake; chemical; pollution

Chemical Fallout: Current Research on Persistent Pesticides. pp. 24-23. 1969.

Physical medium: Printed matter

Book Monograph

Author Address: Department of Zoology, University of California Davis, California USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 359

Author: W. B. Herms

Year: 1937

Title: The Clear Lake gnat

Publisher: Berkeley, Cal. : Agricultural Experiment Station

Short Title: The Clear Lake gnat

Call Number: call # - MS 77/2 321-1 WRCA UCB

Keywords: Diptera -- California.

Diptera -- Control -- California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: insects

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 561

Author: R. Hinton

Title: Estimated Percentage Compositoin of Sport Catch by Species at Clear Lake, California 1936-1961

Publisher: California Department of Fish and Game

Short Title: Estimated Percentage Compositoin of Sport Catch by Species at Clear Lake, California 1936-1961

Abstract: Table # 2 listing Estimated Percentage Composition of Sport Catch by Species from 1936 to 1969. Shows increase in Largemouth Bass during the 1950s, catfish very abundant in thirties and forties. 56% crappie catch in 1969.

Research Notes: photocopied from the California Department of Fish and Game. Assisted by Jay Rowan and DFG Volunteer Gary Sypnicki.

North Central Regional Office

1701 Nimbus Road

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

 

Access Date: 7/7/2011

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 360

Author: R. N. Hinton

Year: 1971

Title: A study of the impact of water quality on recreation use of Clear Lake, California

Place Published: [Sacramento

Publisher: Dept. of Parks and Recreation, Contract Services Section?]

Number of Pages: 63, [15] leaves

Short Title: A study of the impact of water quality on recreation use of Clear Lake, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 24311559 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G4581 K1-2 WRCA UCD

Keywords: Water quality -- California -- Clear Lake.

Clearlake (Calif.)

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement; pollution

California.; Dept. of Parks and Recreation.; Contract Services Section. ; California.; Dept. of Water Resources.

28 cm.

Cover title./ "August 1971."/ Prepared for the Dept. of Water Resources under Interagency Agreement no. B50070./ Includes bibliographical references.

by Ralph N. Hinton.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 361

Author: N. J. Holzhauser

Year: 1976

Title: Factors affecting the diet and growth of largemouth bass in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Place Published: [Davis

Publisher: Calif.]

Number of Pages: 34 l. illus. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Davis.

Short Title: Factors affecting the diet and growth of largemouth bass in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 81775986 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1976 H548 Shields UCD special collections

Keywords: Dissertations, Academic -- California -- Ecology.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

Thesis/dissertation (deg)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 362

Author: L. W. Hom

Year: 1966

Title: Evaluation of water pollution potential of the Clear Lake area of Lake County : final report, 1 July 1965 through 31 March 1966, standard agreement no. 12-10

Place Published: Sacramento

Publisher: [Sacramento State College]

Number of Pages: 230 p. in various pagings

Short Title: Evaluation of water pollution potential of the Clear Lake area of Lake County : final report, 1 July 1965 through 31 March 1966, standard agreement no. 12-10

Accession Number: OCLC: 4325569 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G4581 J6 WRCA UCB

 

LC: TD788.4.C32

Keywords: Water -- Pollution -- California -- Lake County.

Sewage disposal -- California -- Lake County.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: pollution; clear lake

Sacramento State College Foundation. ; California.; State Water Quality Control Board. ; California.; Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board.

ill., maps ; 28 cm.

Submitted to State Water Quality Control Board and Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board./ Includes bibliographical references.

by Sacramento State College Foundation ; Leonard W. Hom, principal investigator.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 363

Author: J. Hopkirk

Year: 1973

Title: Endemism in fishes of the Clear Lake region of Central California.

Journal: Publ. Zool., Univ. Calif.

Issue: 96

Pages: 1-137

Type of Article: Journal Article

Short Title: Endemism in fishes of the Clear Lake region of Central California.

Call Number: call # - QL1 .C3 v.96 Shields UCD

Keywords: clear lake, california, fish, Endemism

Abstract: The complex geological history of the Clear Lake region, which is given, has influenced the evolution of fishes in the Clear Lake Basin. Of the 8 fams of fish native to the area 3 include endemic spp. These are the Cyprinidae, Embiotocidae and Cottidae. Details of subspp observed are given. All endemics are derivatives of lowland spp common in the warm waters near the Delta, and are the result of fluviolacustrine speciation. Intraspecific competition is considered to be the most important selective pressure operative in the evolution of lacustrine adaptations. The major adaptive difference between lake and river populations in the region is in gillraker number. It is noted, however, that minor differences in morphology and behaviour can reproductively and ecologically isolate symapatric populations of lake-and river-adapted fishes.

Notes: fish; clear lake

 

-pg 18-20

            -clear lake basin endemics

                        -Pogonichthys ciscoides (clear lake splittail)

                        -hitch

                        -Endemichthys grandipinnis (clear lake minnow)

                        -H. traskii lagunae (clear lake tuleperch)

                        -C. asper (clear lake prickly sculpin)

            -14 natives, 5 endemics

            -1894, Entosphenus tridentatus (pacific lamprey) occasionally taken. Not since then, rainbow trout, thicktail chub, sacramento Pikeminnow, hardhead, California roach, sacramento blackfish, California sucker, stickleback, sacramento perch

-pg 111

            -1973, bluegill is dominant

            -catch records (1936-1963)

-pg 114

            -1925, splittail very abundant (coleman 1930)

            -1938, splittail most abundant (Lindquist 1943)

            -1946 and 1961, splittail almost absent (Murphy 1951 and cook 1964)

            -1940’s, decline of sucker, Pikeminnow, splittail, chub, clear lake minnow

            -reasons for decline

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 364

Author: J. D. Hopkirk

Year: 1988

Title: Fish Evolution and the Late Pleistocene and Holocene History of Clear Lake, California

Journal: Geological Society of America

Pages: 183-193

Short Title: Fish Evolution and the Late Pleistocene and Holocene History of Clear Lake, California

Accession Number: 8910150

Keywords: California; Cores; Paleolimnology; Fish; Lake basins; Geologic

history; Paleoclimatology; Lake sediments; Geothermal studies;

Paleohydrology; Palynology; Stratigraphy; Sedimentology; Quaternary

Period; Cenozoic Era; Holocene Epoch; Pleistocene Epoch; Spawning;

Trophic levels; Benthic fauna; Perch; Correlation analysis;

Bioindicators; Pollen; Oak trees

SW 0850 Lakes; SW 0870 Erosion and sedimentation

Abstract: Clear Lake in Lake County, California, has an endemic fish fauna composed of five lake-adapted forms derived from lowland stream-adapted forms present in surrounding drainage basins. Two of the five endemic forms are extinct. The three remaining endemics maintain themselves despite the destruction of sloughs and tule beds surrounding Clear Lake that are used for spawning and nursery areas. Trophic specializations of the endemic fishes indicate past selection for feeding on small benthic and pelagic invertebrates. The presence of fine particles in the substrate and the reduced activity of tributary streams for at least the past 10,000 years are major hydrographic features contributing to the evolution of these trophic adaptations. Subfossil scales of the endemic Clear Lake tuleperch (Hysterocarpus traskii lagunae), present in three U.S. Geological Survey cores (CL-73-7 , -6, and -8), removed from the bottom of Clear Lake in 1973 were analyzed by for age and growth rate. Periods of increased scale growth were inferred to represent warming of the lake. Comparison of the scale data with pollen data indicate that maximum scale growth (core CL-75-8) occurred at about 19 ka, or 15 ka, during a cold interval. Fluctuations in scale density in cores CL-73-4 and CL-73-7, however, seem to follow fluctuations in oak pollen. It is therefore concluded that maximum-scale growth represents cool periods, whereas maximum-scale density represents warm periods in the history of the lake. During the period that maximum-scale growth occurred, Clear Lake basin may have also been closed off from surrounding basins and the lake enriched with nutrients. (See also W89-10137) (Author 's abstract)

Notes: fish; clear lake; arcaeological

Late Quaternary Climate, Tectonism, Sedimentation in Clear Lake, Northern California Coasts. Geological Society of America, Boulder CO. 1988. p 183-193, 4 fig, 4 tab, 50 ref.

Author Address: Sonoma State Univ. Rohnert Park, CA

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 365

Author: A. J. Horne

Year: 1975

Title: The ecology of Clear Lake phytoplankton

Place Published: [Lakeport, Calif.]

Publisher: Clear Lake Algal Research Unit

Number of Pages: vi, 116 p.

Short Title: The ecology of Clear Lake phytoplankton

Accession Number: OCLC: 2639662 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - QK935 .H67 Shields UCD

 

LC: QK571.5.C3

Keywords: Freshwater algae -- California -- Clear Lake.

Cyanobacterial blooms -- California -- Clear Lake.

Algal blooms -- California -- Clear Lake.

Plankton blooms -- California -- Clear Lake.

Algae -- Control -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: algae; clear lake

Clear Lake Algal Research Unit.

ill. ; 28 cm.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 107-116).

by A.J. Horne.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 366

Author: A. J. Horne

Year: 1979

Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear Lake, California .4. Diel Studies on Aphanizomenon and Anabaena Blooms

Journal: Limnology and Oceanography

Volume: 24

Issue: 2

Pages: 329-341

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear Lake, California .4. Diel Studies on Aphanizomenon and Anabaena Blooms

ISSN: 0024-3590

Accession Number: ISI:A1979GS84700010

Abstract: Day and night measurements of Nz fixation (as acetylene reduction) were made during spring blooms of Aphanixomenonjlos-aquae and two autumn blooms of Anabaena spp. From 9 to 23% of the 24-h fixation occurred between 1100 and 1300 hours. Nitrogen fixation in spring showed complex, physically shallow but optically deep and mobile subsurface peaks of nitrogenase activity, which were totally unrelated to Aphanixomenon biomass but may have been due to diel changes in light penetrating the relatively clear water. Nocturnal fixation was uniformly distributed with depth and accounted for t/J to $5 of daylight fixation. In more turbid autumn waters, the pattern of N2 fixation for Anabaena blooms was simpler, with a surface (or near-surface) peak decreasing with depth. Nocturnal fixation was more uniformly distributed with depth. The difference in fixation patterns between the two species is attributable to the interactions of oxygen with the nitrogenase enzyme system. The diel changes in nitrogenase activity suggest a need to establish whether the precursors of nitrogenase accumulate in an oxygen-stable form.

Notes: ONLINE; nitrogen fixation

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1979GS84700010

http://aslo.org/lo/toc/vol_24/issue_2/0329.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 367

Author: A. J. Horne, J. E. Dillard, D. K. Fujita and C. R. Goldman

Year: 1972

Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear-Lake, California .2. Synoptic Studies on Autumn Anabaena Bloom

Journal: Limnology and Oceanography

Volume: 17

Issue: 5

Pages: 693-703

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear-Lake, California .2. Synoptic Studies on Autumn Anabaena Bloom

ISSN: 0024-3590

Accession Number: ISI:A1972O375900005

Abstract: Nitrogen fixation at three stages of an autumnal bloom of Anabaena circinalis was measured after almost simultaneous collection at up to 32 stations in Clear Lake and algal heterocysts, phytoplankton cell numbers, N03-N, NH4-N, dissolved organic-N, P04-P, Fe, primary production, particulate carbon, and chlorophyll a were also measured. Nitrogen fixation was significantly and positively correlated to Anabaena heterocyst numbers (P >0.001), negatively correlated to N03-N (P> 0.01), and positively correlated to dissolved organic-N (P > 0.01) and P04-P (P > 0.05). A negative correlation with NH4 is probable; no significant relationship was found with the other variables measured. An explanation of the apparent restriction of substantial cyanophycean N2 fixation to nonoligotrophic waters is proposed. The results are consistent with the theory that heterocysts are responsible for N2 fixation in situ under oxic conditions.

Notes: ONLINE; nitrogen fixation

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1972O375900005

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/2834719.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 368

Author: A. J. Horne and C. R. Goldman

Year: 1972

Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear-Lake, California .1. Seasonal-Variation and Role of Heterocysts

Journal: Limnology and Oceanography

Volume: 17

Issue: 5

Pages: 678-692

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear-Lake, California .1. Seasonal-Variation and Role of Heterocysts

ISSN: 0024-3590

Accession Number: ISI:A1972O375900004

Abstract: The annual contribution of N2 fixation to Clear Lake in 1970 was about 550 tonnes, 500 Mg (megagrams) or 18 kg ha-\ 43% of the lake's yearly nitrogen inflow. Biological N2 fixation can provide the nitrogen for almost half the blue-green algal standing crop during blooms and is implicated as the main cause of large algal nuisance blooms on this lake. The large quantity of nitrogen fixed may be typical for large, shallow, cyanophyceandominated lakes. A sustained spring peak of fixation was associated with a simultaneous bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae in all three basins, an autumn peak with an ephemeral bloom of Anabaena circinaliY occurring at a different time in each basin. A stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that fluctuations in N2 fixation were best described by variations in heterocysts, quantities of blue-green algae, P04-P, NOs-N, and temperature. Annual rates of N2 fixation were correlated with the proportion of heterocysts to vegetative cells in Aphanizomenon and with total number of heterocysts in Anabaena. Previous nitrogen budgets for Clear Lake have shown a large excess of nitrogen in outflow over inflow, which is accounted for by the levels of N2 fixation measured.

Notes: ONLINE; nitrogen fixation

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1972O375900004

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/2834718.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 369

Author: A. J. Horne, J. C. Sandusky and C. J. W. Carmiggelt

Year: 1979

Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear Lake, California .3. Repetitive Synoptic Sampling of the Spring Aphanizomenon Blooms

Journal: Limnology and Oceanography

Volume: 24

Issue: 2

Pages: 316-328

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Nitrogen-Fixation in Clear Lake, California .3. Repetitive Synoptic Sampling of the Spring Aphanizomenon Blooms

ISSN: 0024-3590

Accession Number: ISI:A1979GS84700009

Abstract: Nitrogen fixation (as acetylene reduction) and factors most likely to influence it were estimated simultaneously for 31 sites at eight stages of the 1971 and 1972 spring blooms of Aphanixomenon in naturally eutrophic Clear Lake. The major factor controlling rates of N2 fixation was the number of Aphanixomenon heterocysts (P < 0.001). Environmental influences on fixation were largely mediated through heterocyst induction or repression. Regression analysis showed heterocysts highly negatively related to NO3 (P < 0.05). At high (linear regressions) but not at low (log-transformed regressions) numbers, heterocysts were positively correlated with phosphate (P < 0.05). At low rates of Nz fixation, heterocysts were also positively related to water clarity, chlorophyll (both P < 0.05), and temperature (P < 0.01). The role of very low levels of nitrate (2-22 pg. liter-l NO,-N) in (apparently) indirectly suppressing heterocyst induction was unexpected. Only at high rates was N, fixation correlated with phosphate. Presumably at low rates sufficient phosphorus is available in this P-rich lake (14- 43 pg*liter-’ PO,-P) to permit repression of heterocyst formation by low NO, levels. Ammonium suppressed N, fixation and heterocyst formation only where it was present in relatively large quantities (20-170 pgmliter-’ NH,-N). Early in the blooms, low rates of vegetative (i.e. nonheterocyst) N, fixation were indicated in the “flake colonies of Aphanixomenon. These may have an anoxic center like that of Trichodesmium.

Notes: ONLINE; nitrogen fixation

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1979GS84700009

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/2835496.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 370

Author: A. Houck and J. J. Cech

Year: 2004

Title: Effects of dietary methylmercury on juvenile Sacramento blackfish bioenergetics

Journal: Aquatic Toxicology

Volume: 69

Issue: 2

Pages: 107-123

Date: Aug

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Effects of dietary methylmercury on juvenile Sacramento blackfish bioenergetics

ISSN: 0166-445X

Accession Number: ISI:000223021200001

Keywords: methylmercury (MeHg); fish bioenergetics; MeHg assimilation; bioaccumulation TROUT ONCORHYNCHUS-MYKISS; CRAB CALLINECTES-SAPIDUS; METHYL MERCURY CHLORIDE; AMINO-ACID CARRIER; RAINBOW-TROUT; SALMO-GAIRDNERI; ORTHODON-MICROLEPIDOTUS; INORGANIC MERCURY; LAKE TROUT; FISH

Abstract: Although much is known about the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in the environment, relatively little is known about methylmercury (MeHg) bioaccumulation in fishes and how chronic sub-lethal exposures affect their functioning. Several species of fish in Clear Lake, California have high MeHg tissue levels, including Sacramento blackfish, Orthodon microlepidotus, a large native cyprinid that is fished commercially. We fed juvenile blackfish one of four diets containing MeHg (0.21 mg/kg control; 0.52 mg/kg low; 22.2 mg/kg medium; and 55.5 mg/kg high treatments) for 70 days. There were no statistical differences (P > 0.05) in food consumption among the treatment groups. By 35 days the high treatment group had a significantly depressed growth rate when compared to the control group (P < 0.05) and by 70 days both the medium and the high groups had significantly lower growth rates (P < 0.05). The high-dose group had a significantly (P < 0.05) lower specific growth rate (SGR) compared all other treatment groups at 35 days, although by 70 days these differences were not significant. The wet/dry muscle mass and muscle mass/total mass ratios, condition factor, and resting routine metabolic rates at both 35 and 70 days were statistically indistinguishable (P > 0.05) between treatment groups. All treatment groups assimilated the dietary MeHg into muscle tissue in a dose-dependent fashion. Percent assimilation was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the high-dose group compared to the low-dose group at 35 days, (control 53%, low-dose 61%, medium-dose 50%, and high-dose 40%) but at 70 days assimilation was lower (35, 43, 42, and 32%, respectively) and statistically indistinguishable (P > 0.05) among the treatment groups. Dietary MeHg concentrations and bioaccumulation rates were correlated (r(2) = 0.98 at 35 days, 0.99 at 70 days). These results may contribute to construction of ecosystem mercury models and more informed natural resources management at Clear Lake. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Notes: ONLINE; fish, bioaccumulation

 

-pg 107

            -blackfish with higher methyl mercury uptake had lower growth rates at 35 days

            -by 70 days no differences

-pg 108

            -in freshwater systems, majority og methyl mercury is generated by bacteria in surface sediments and transferred by trophic processes

-pg 113

            -figures 2 &3, growth (weight)

                        -Day 35 significant difference between high and control

                        -day 70 significant differences between high/medium and control

-pg 116

            -figure 7, bioaccumulation

URL: <Go to ISI>://000223021200001

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6T4G-4CTCXGS-1-1J&_cdi=4974&_user=4421&_orig=search&_coverDate=08%2F10%2F2004&_sk=999309997&view=c&wchp=dGLbVlW-zSkWA&md5=b71af5a88bfeeaf19a30cc0eae22af65&ie=/sdarticle.pdf

Language: ONLINE

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 371

Author: R. W. Howarth and R. Marino

Year: 1990

Title: Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacteria in the Plankton of Lakes and Estuaries - Reply to the comment by Smith

Journal: Limnology and Oceanography

Volume: 35

Issue: 8

Pages: 1859-1863

Date: Dec

Type of Article: Note

Short Title: Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacteria in the Plankton of Lakes and Estuaries - Reply to the comment by Smith

ISSN: 0024-3590

Accession Number: ISI:A1990FE65500019

Keywords: FIXATION ACETYLENE-REDUCTION; MARINE ECOSYSTEMS; FRESH-WATER; CLEAR-LAKE; PHYTOPLANKTON; BLOOMS; HETEROCYSTS; CALIFORNIA; LIMITATION; NODULARIA

Notes: ONLINE; nitrogen fixation

REPLY

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1990FE65500019

http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/3096616.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 372

Author: E. G. A. L. B. Hunt

Year: 1960

Title: Inimical effects on wildlife of periodic ddd applications to clear lake

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 46

Issue: 1

Pages: 91-106

Short Title: Inimical effects on wildlife of periodic ddd applications to clear lake

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Notes: pollution; insects; clear lake; fish; birds, bioaccumulation

 

-pg 95

            -september 1949, 14,000 gallons of DDD (TDE) used

                        -6 barges applied the chemicals

                        -few gnats for two years

            -july 1951, gnat larvae found

            -september 1954, second DDD treatment

            -december 1954, 100 western grebe deas

            -march 1955, more dead grebes

            -1955-1956, gnat population increases

            -september 1957, thirds DDD treatment

            -december 1957, 75 grebes dead. 16,000 ppm

-pg 96

            -march 1958, 40 ppm in carp to 2,500 ppm in bullhead

-pg 97

            -DDD breaks down slowly

-pg 98

            -bull frogs, 5 ppm

            -july 1958, highest ppm in white catfish and largemouth bass

-pg 100

            -before treatments (1949) 1,000 pairs of nesting grebes

                        -less than 25 in 1958 and 1959

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 373

Author: A. R. Jager

Year: 1996

Title: Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

Short Title: Surface water supply for the Clearlake, California Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Project

Accession Number: DE96009085

Keywords: Geothermal Power Plants; Geothermal Energy; Hot-Dry-Rock Systems;

Surface Waters; Water Quality; Water Supply; Water Use

edb/150200

48F Natural Resources & Earth Sciences: Geology & Geophysics;

97P Energy: Geothermal Energy

Abstract: It is proposed to construct a demonstration Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal plant in the vicinity of the City of Clearlake. An interim evaluation has been made of the availability of surface water to supply the plant. The evaluation has required consideration of the likely water consumption of such a plant. It has also required consideration of population, land, and water uses in the drainage basins adjacent to Clear Lake, where the HDR demonstration project is likely to be located. Five sources were identified that appear to be able to supply water of suitable quality in adequate quantity for initial filling of the reservoir, and on a continuing basis, as makeup for water losses during operation. Those sources are California Cities Water Company, a municipal supplier to the City of Clearlake; Clear Lake, controlled by Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Borax Lake, controlled by a local developer; Southeast Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, controlled by Lake County; and wells, ponds, and streams on private land. The evaluation involved the water uses, water rights, stream flows, precipitation, evaporation, a water balance, and water quality. In spite of California's prolonged drought, the interim conclusion is that adequate water is available at a reasonable cost to supply the proposed HDR demonstration project.

Notes: water rights; clear lake; ONLINE

Performer: Los Alamos National Lab., NM. Sponsor: Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Mar 1996. 39p. Report: LA-12718-HDR

Sponsored by Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

Contract W-7405-ENG-36

URL: http://www.osti.gov/energycitations/servlets/purl/219402-fcsgjY/webviewable/219402.PDF

 

 

Reference Type:  Web Page

Record Number: 374

Author: S. Jahagirdar

Year: 2006

Title: A clean water future for California : how California's water boards can clean up nine of the state's biggest polluted rivers, lakes and bays

Publisher: [Los Angeles, Calif.] : Environment California

Description: [100] p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Type of Medium: Book; Internet Resource Date of Entry: 20060210

Short Title: A clean water future for California : how California's water boards can clean up nine of the state's biggest polluted rivers, lakes and bays

Accession Number: OCLC: 63680694 Provider: OCLC

Keywords: Water resources development -- California.

Environmental policy -- California.

Water-supply -- California.

Environmental protection -- California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: pollution; clear lake; ONLINE

Environment California.

Introduction -- Waterway profiles -- The bays -- San Francisco Bay -- Humboldt Bay -- Santa Monica Bay -- Clean water success story: Shelter Island Yacht Basin -- The rivers -- Sacramento River -- Klamath River -- San Joaquin River -- Clean water success story: Garcia River -- The lakes -- Clear lake -- Lake Tahoe -- Eagle Lake -- Policy recommendations -- Conclusion.

"February 2006."/ Includes bibliographical references.

LC: TD224 .C3

Sujatha Jahagirdar.

Internet resource (url)

URL: http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/uploads/Dn/BA/DnBAEp3UOs8KlWBgwnMVDg/clean%5Fwater%5Ffuture.pdf

Materials specified: Full report http://www.environmentcalifornia.org/uploads/Dn/BA/DnBAEp3UOs8KlWBgwnMVDg/clean%5Fwater%5Ffuture.pdfMaterials specified: Summaryhttp://www.environmentcalifornia.org/reports/clean-water/clean-water-program-reports/a-clean-water-future-for-california-how-californias-water-boards-can-clean-up-nine-of-the-states-biggest-polluted-rivers-lakes-and-bays

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 487

Author: J. Joaquin

Year: 1989

Title: Traditional Pomo Fishing

Journal: News from Native California

Volume: 3

Issue: 3

Pages: 1

Start Page: 12

Date: July/August 1989

Short Title: Traditional Pomo Fishing

Notes: native american

 

-pg 12

            -salmon, steelhead, trout, pike, suckers, hitch, etc

            -fish dams, weirs, basketry traps, poisons, seine nets, dip nets, harpoons, hooks and lines

            -fish divers, caught fish and scared them towards fish dams

 

 

Reference Type:  Audiovisual Material

Record Number: 377

Author: D. B. J. R. T. E. S. Jolliffe

Year: 2006

Title: Hinth'el Gaahnula (Talking Indian) : a narrative history of Lake County Pomo history through 1900

Publisher: [Lake County, CA]. : Big Valley Rancheria

Extent of Work: 1 videodisc (72 min.)

Type: Videorecording (vid)

Short Title: Hinth'el Gaahnula (Talking Indian) : a narrative history of Lake County Pomo history through 1900

Alternate Title: Talking Indian

Accession Number: OCLC: 77499759 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 970.3 HINTH'EL Lakeport Lib, Redbud Lib, Middletown Lib, Upper Lake Lib; E99 P65 H56 2006  Media Discs 2nd Fl  CSUC

Keywords: Pomo Indians -- California -- Lake County.

Pomo Indians -- Culture.

Pomo Indians -- History.

Indians of North America -- California -- Lake County.

Abstract: Presented by the Big Vallye Rancheria in association with the Administration for Native Americans, this program covers 12,000 years of Pomo history and culture in the Clear Lake area, up to about 1900, including basketry, traditional foods, language and trade networks. Discusses contact and conflict with Europeans and Americans, including the Spanish, Mexicans and Russians in California, with attention to the Bloody Island Massacre (Bo-No-Po-Ti), Bear Flag Rebellion, Gold Rush, and treatires. Includes voiceovers of family traditions and memories.

Notes: native american; settlement

Big Valley Rancheria.

4 3/4 in.

Participants: Narrated by James BlueWorlf. Additional voiceovers by Tim Ramos, David Jolliffe and Steven Elias./ Audience: Rated PG-13.

Big Valley Rancheria; directed by David Jolliffe; written and produced by James BlueWolf.

Visual Material

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 491

Author: T. L. J. F. H. Jones

Year: 1993

Title: Problems and Prospects in Sonoma County Archaeology, in There Grows a Green Tree: Papers in

Honor of David A. Fredrickson

Place Published: Center for Archaeological Research at Davis, Publication 11, Davis, California

Short Title: Problems and Prospects in Sonoma County Archaeology, in There Grows a Green Tree: Papers in

Honor of David A. Fredrickson

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: native american

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 378

Author: W. J. Jones

Year: 2001

Title: DNA sequence divergence and speciation in two California minnows (Cyprinidae: Lavinia exilicauda and L. (= Hesperoleucus) symmetricus)

Place Published: United States -- California

University: University of California, Santa Cruz

Thesis Type: Ph.D.

Short Title: DNA sequence divergence and speciation in two California minnows (Cyprinidae: Lavinia exilicauda and L. (= Hesperoleucus) symmetricus)

Accession Number: 3032263

Keywords: Genetics

Molecular biology

Abstract: The general objective of this research was to understand the phylogenetic relationships among two closely related freshwater minnows (Cyprinidae; Lavinia symmetricus and L. exilicauda ) in California. In particular, the aims were to (1) establish a phylogenetic hypothesis of relationships among currently recognized subspecies of Lavinia ; (2) use molecular systematics and morphological characters to define the evolutionary distinct Red Hills L. symmetricus ; and (3) use a suite of molecular markers to document levels of hybridization and introgression between L. symmetricus and L. exilicauda . Phylogenetic relationships among Lavinia subspecies were estimated using two mitochondrial genes and one nuclear intron. In the majority of cases, recognized subspecies of Lavinia formed reciprocally monophyletic groups for mitochondrial DNA (nDNA) and appeared fixed for subspecies-specific nuclear DNA alleles (nDNA). In populations where L. symmetricus and L. exilicauda have been known to hybridize (Monterey Bay Rivers and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers), mtDNA haplotypes and nuclear alleles were shared across species boundaries. Molecular phylogenetics and multivariate analysis of morphological data for the Red Hills subspecies of L. symmetricus were used to better understand the historical relationships and the extent of gene flow between the state-protected Red Hills populations and their widespread congeners. As in a previous study, the Red Hills population was distinct morphologically from neighboring populations. Molecular data further suggested that the Red Hills populations are reciprocally monophyletic for mitochondrial DNA and thus form an evolutionary unique assemblage. Hybridization between L. symmetricus and L. exilicauda was estimated using three nuclear markers and one mitochondrial marker. Lavinia symmetricus and L. exilicauda occur sympatrically in three independent river drainages. The influence of drought conditions and low rainfall were investigated to see if there was a correlation between these environmental factors with either hybrid abundance or spawning between L. symmetricus and L. exilicauda . Introgression of "alien" alleles were similar for species, drainages, and nuclear markers. However, mitochondrial DNA introgressed across species boundaries to a higher degree. Drought conditions appear to play a role in that hybrids were more common when there was no drought (as indicated by the Palmer Index). Spawning between L. symmetricus and L. exilicauda appeared more common in years when there were drought or low rainfall conditions.

Notes: genetics; hitch; ONLINE

 

-           Pg 1

- L. symmetricus and L. exilicauda haven’t all merged into a hybrid

-           Pg 4

- CL hitch is only known subspecies to spawn in streams

- Decreased spawning runs (dam, pollution, habitat loss) (Macedo 1994)

-           Pg 20

- Low divergence between them

    - Possibly because exilicauda recently diverged from symmetricus in order to adapt to a new environment (CL). Had more gill rakers than other exilicauda subspecies, behavioral traits (spawn in streams), increased growth rate (Pg 21)

-           Pg 25

- In CL, represent distinct gene pools

-           Pg 109

- No known hybrids in CL except possible hybrid between blackfish and hitch

-           Ph 131

- CL important region for CL hitch evolution (appears they evolved while in CL)

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=726096931&Fmt=7&clientId=1567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?vinst=PROD&fmt=6&startpage=-1&clientid=1567&vname=PQD&RQT=309&did=726096931&scaling=FULL&vtype=PQD&rqt=309&TS=1216916177&clientId=1567

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 379

Author: T. S. Kaufman

Year: 1980

Title: Early Prehistory of the Clear Lake Area, Lake County, California

Place Published: United States -- California

University: University of California, Los Angeles

Thesis Type: Ph.D.

Short Title: Early Prehistory of the Clear Lake Area, Lake County, California

Accession Number: 8111240

Call Number: call # - LD791.9.A6 K164 SRLF

Keywords: Archaeology

Abstract: Beginning with M. R. Harrington's controversial 1948 report on the Borax Lake Site, the Clear Lake area of Lake County, northern California has been of considerable interest as a candidate for early human occupation in western North America. Both new and existing archaeological evidence have been examined with the objective of elucidating the chronology and adaptations of early human populations in the Clear Lake basin. Obsidian hydration dating and radiocarbon dating constitute the primary analytical procedures. The research also emphasizes studies of specific problems intrinsic to the successful application of obsidian hydration and radiocarbon dating. The asemblages analysed consisted primarily of local obsidian materials and included specimens from the Mostin Site and several other contexts near Clear Lake. Obsidian hydration dating reveals a general occupation of the study area at a time level equivalent to the earliest use of the Borax Lake Site reported by Meighan and Haynes (1970). Source characterization analysis indicates an overall predominance of Borax Lake obsidian although Mt. Konocti and Napa sources were also utilized. Obsidian hydration seriation of bifacial artifact specimens suggests potential chronological significance for many of the types analysed, although most tool categories exhibited considerable hydration range and overlap. Hydration data from the Houx Site suggest that the Houx and Borax Lake components are of nearly the same maximum age. Data also indicate some possibility for variation in hydration rates due to microenvironmental conditions and intra-source variation in obsidian composition. Analysis of contemporary lake shells provides evidence of minor contamination of Clear Lake by magmatic carbon emitted from gaseous springs. Most importantly, analysis of the Mostin Site reveals an extensive burial population as well as considerable evidence for habitation activities. Radiocarbon dating of Mostin Site human bone collagen and charcoal results in ages between approximately 7000 and 11,000 radiocarbon years B.P. The association of a conical stone pestle with a ca. 10,000 B.P. dated Mostin Site burial implies substantially greater antiquity than is normally attributed to this artifact form. Overall, the data provide extensive evidence for widespread human occupation of the Clear Lake basin during terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene times and confirm major importance for this area in the study of early human populations in the New World.

Notes: settlement; clear lake

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=751970211&Fmt=7&clientId=1567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

 

Reference Type:  Book Section

Record Number: 503

Author: W. Kienle

Year: 1990

Title: Volcanoes of North America: United States and Canada

Book Title: Volcanoes of North America: United States and Canada

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Pages: 354 p. total, p.149

Short Title: Volcanoes of North America: United States and Canada

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 380

Author: J. G. Kim

Year: 1999

Title: Paleoecological studies for assessment of anthropogenic impacts in Montane, Mediterranean, and tropical marshes

Journal: Dissertation Abstracts International Part B: Science and Engineering

Volume: 60

Issue: 10

Pages: 4995

Date: Apr

Short Title: Paleoecological studies for assessment of anthropogenic impacts in Montane, Mediterranean, and tropical marshes

Alternate Journal: Diss. Abst. Int. Pt. B - Sci. & Eng.

Accession Number: 4756934

Keywords: Article Subject Terms: Anthropogenic factors; Climatic changes;

Ecosystem management; Environment management; Environmental impact;

Human impact; Introduced species; Man-induced effects; Marshes;

Mountains; Nutrients; Palaeoecology; Paleoecology; Plant communities;

Plant populations; Pollen; Population-environment relations;

Restoration; Sedimentation; Tropical environment; Water quality;

Wetlands; Article Geographic Terms: Belize; USA, California, Clear L.;

USA, Sierra Nevada Mts.

Freshwater

Q5 01521 Mechanical and natural changes; M1 220 Human

Population-Hydrosphere Interactions

Abstract: Wetlands are valuable as sources, sinks and transformers of a multitude of chemical and biological materials. Since the Industrial Revolution, wetlands in many regions have been lost or changed their roles at an exponential rate mostly due to human activities. These anthropogenic impacts should be evaluated in the sense of wetland structure and function. Sediment cores were collected from three montane marshes in the Northern Sierra Nevada, two mediterranean inland marshes around Clear Lake, CA and six tropical inland marshes in Belize to assess the impact of watershed environmental conditions altered by human activities and climatic change. Pollen analysis was conducted in montane marshes and physico-chemical characteristics were determined in all marshes. Cores were <super>210</super>Pb dated with the Constant Rate of Supply model or the Constant Initial Concentration model. Pollen analyses indicated changes in plant communities caused by human activities. It was possible to track the arrival time of introduced species from the combined pollen record and <super>210</super>Pb date. Physico-chemical records documented human activities such as logging, road construction and maintenance. Establishment of unpaved roads in the marsh proximity was reflected in increased sedimentation rate. Road salt application increased the concentration of sodium and calcium. Water quality was responsible for the change of sedimentation rate in the mediterranean marsh. Water level was responsible for the change of plant community, resulting in the change of sediment characteristics and sedimentation rate in tropical marshes. Relative values, such as C/N, N/P, and P/Ca, as well as absolute concentrations of nutrients were useful tools to assess the response of wetland sediments to the increased nutrient input. Physical disturbance (road building) and vegetation change caused by variation in water quality and water level were most important for the change of sediment characteristics and sedimentation rate. This study suggests that sedimentation processes should be evaluated in the context of related physico-chemical and biological processes: change of water level, change of nutrient input, response of plant and microbial communities (production and decomposition). This work contributes to the fundamental biogeochemical knowledge of the sedimentation process and provides information potentially useful for wetland management and restoration.

Notes: botany; clear lake; settlement; ONLINE

Journal Article

 

-           Pg 7

- Elevation 404 m, inner coast range

- Annual mean: Temp~16 C, precipitation=635 mm

- Anderson marsh, southeast, well preserved outlet

- Rodman slough, northwest inlet, diked, drained, ag for many years (1800’s)

-           Pg 46

- Wetlands function in removal of “organic and inorganic nutrients through increases sedimentation from water column”

- The sediment records environmental changes

-           Pg 47

- 30% of inflow via Scotts and Middle through Rodman

- marshes-sediment and nutrient removal

- changes of Rodman resulted increase of water speed which means particles don’t get caught in marsh, goes to lake

-           Pg 48

- 1958-stopped annual dredging for levee maintenance (Rodman)

- 1920’s-Rodman lake reclaimed

- 1959-RS reclaimed for ag

- 1969-Scotts gravel mined for roads

- 1996-97-US ACE developed middle creek ecosystem restoration study to reduce nutrient input

- higher nutrient input has created increase in algal blooms

- 1925-1939-(Richerson 1994) blue green algae began to bloom

- 1984-1990-large algal bloom (Neale and Woodmansee 1994)

- 1987-since then P constant increase (Neale and Woddmansee 1994)

-           Pg 53

- Sediment cores

    - Anderson-dark brown peat

    - Rodman-sand, fine sand, plant litter (willow and aspen leaves, small woody material)

-           Pg 66

- 1977-severe drought, lake level lowest in 50 years

-           Pg 72

- “major cation [ ]’s except Mg were higher in Anderson than in rodman sediment”

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=0&did=730218711&SrchMode=1&sid=1&Fmt=6&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&TS=1216066814&clientId=1567

Author Address: University of California, Davis, CA, USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 381

Author: J. G. Kim

Year: 2003

Title: Response of sediment chemistry and accumulation rates to recent environmental changes in the Clear Lake watershed, California, USA

Journal: Wetlands

Volume: 23

Issue: 1

Pages: 95-103

Date: Mar

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Response of sediment chemistry and accumulation rates to recent environmental changes in the Clear Lake watershed, California, USA

ISSN: 0277-5212

Accession Number: ISI:000181785300009

Keywords: Clear Lake; land-use change; nutrient analyses; sediment characteristics; sedimentation rate; Pb-210 dating NUTRIENT ACCUMULATION; ORGANIC-MATTER; TAHOE BASIN; EVERGLADES; ACCRETION; MARSHES; DISTURBANCE; FLORIDA; RECORD

Abstract: The Clear Lake watershed, California, USA has been modified for agriculture since the arrival of Europeans in the early 1800s, and this has led to the deterioration of lake water quality. To assess the response of Clear Lake wetland sediments to recent environmental changes caused by watershed modification, physical and chemical properties of sediment cores at the inlet (Rodman Slough) and outlet (Anderson Marsh) were analyzed. Pb-210 dating showed increases of sedimentation rate for Anderson Marsh in the 1930s and 1980s, and those increases corresponded to algal blooms and the increase of P input into Clear Lake, respectively. Ranges of recent sedimentation and mass accumulation rates in Anderson Marsh were 0.41-0.52 cm/yr and 1070-1380 g m(-2) yr(-1). Accumulation rates-of P, Cal Mg, K, and Pb were slightly higher in Rodman Slough than in Anderson Marsh. Sediment analyses showed that the excess P originating from agricultural activities reach Clear Lake through Rodman Slough and were removed in the lake.

Notes: clear lake; settlement; soil; ONLINE

URL: <Go to ISI>://000181785300009

http://www.bioone.org/archive/0277-5212/23/1/pdf/i0277-5212-23-1-95.pdf

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 382

Author: J. B. Kimsey

Year: 1957

Title: Largemouth black bass tagging at Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 43

Issue: (2)

Pages: 111-118

Date: 1957

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Largemouth black bass tagging at Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19573100033804

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: From a total of 333 disk dangler and staple tags inserted between June, 1953, and March, 1954, a 3-year return of 94 (28.2%) tags was received, 54 the 1st year, 37 the 2d year, and 3 the 3d year. Movements were undirected. Survival was calculated to be 44% and the annual expectation of death was 56%. Fishing mortality accounted for 20% of the annual expectation of death and natural causes for 36%. ABSTRACT AUTHORS: J. B. Kimsey

Notes: fish

 

-pg 111

            -1915, control of water by dam

-pg 113

            -mean length of largemouth bass is 9.4 inches

-pg 114

            -89% of fish in second or third summer

-pg 116

            -average distance traveled is 4.5 miles

            -annual survival rate is 44%, therefore 56% death rate (20% harvest, 36% natural)

-pg 117

            -undirected migration

            -over fishing not an issue

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19573100033804

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 383

Author: J. B. Kimsey

Year: 1960

Title: Observations on the spawning of Sacramento hitch in a lacustrine environment

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 46

Issue: 2

Pages: 211-215

Short Title: Observations on the spawning of Sacramento hitch in a lacustrine environment

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Notes: hitch; clear lake; tributaries

 

-pg 211

            -hitch are too big in second year to be forage fish

            -indications hitch can spawn in lakes

            -1956, observations of hitch spawning in clear lake with carp feeding around them

-pg 212

            -april 25, 1957, clear lake oaks, hitch spawning (6-14 inches)

            -may 3, 1957, 7 pm fish spawning

-pg 213

            -may 9, 1957, no hitch observed in schindler

            -may 3, 1957, observation of hitch in middle and lyons creek

            -1948, hitch planted in pond in schindler creek drainage (self sustaining but not connected to clear lake)

-pg 215

            -not obligatory stream spawners

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 384

Author: E. Knapp

Year: 1855

Title: Gold rush letter, 1855 May 27

Number of Pages: 2 items.

Date: 1855

Type of Work: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 20011002

Short Title: Gold rush letter, 1855 May 27

Abbreviation: Eli Knapp gold rush letter,; 1855 May 27.

Accession Number: OCLC: 58948758 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - MANUSCRIPT SMCII Box 13 Folder 16 State lib CSL Ca Manuscripts

Keywords: Pioneers -- California -- Clear Lake -- Correspondence.

Knapp, Eli -- Correspondence.

Clear Lake (Calif.) -- History.

Abstract: Letter dated May 27, 1855, written by Eli Knapp to his wife, Mabel, no address. One folded sheet of four closely-written pages, it begins with "Clear Lake Nappa Co Cal"and the salutation "Dear Mabel" and ends abruptly with Knapp's signature. Transcription included. Eli describes his journey to Clear Lake: "I Left Grass valley for the purpose of viewing on May the 8th went on foot to Mariesville at which place I bought a Mule Saddle & Bridle & rope Called here Lassso or Lariat for stakeing out animals in this country and some provisions necessary." In the "Seaport town on the sacramento river (Collousa)", Knapp takes up with Mr. Stewart, Mr. Rawlens and Mr. Handy and they jointly venture to Clear Lake where they intend to stake out claims and settle down to farm and ranch. Settlement at Clear Lake is just beginning: "... first settlers came in last summer." Knapp comments on the fine prospects there as if to justify his extended stay away from home. His plan is to ranch, perhaps begin a dairy. "I feel queer to step out of my Cabin Because I cant walk without treading on Claover and Oats eaqual in quantity to any I have eaver Cultivated my range in preferable to any I have seen ... " He talks also of the abundance of game and fish, including mention of the Indians fishing with scoop nets. He is most anxious to have family join him "At a proper time after Indian difficulties are settles I want my family here I want you fathers family here Mother knapp Elliott & horace and all good neighbors ... " He sends a message to his children "tell children I have got a spoted watch puppy that will stay all day to the cabin and watch and will sleep out with my little mule if i want him to whose back is about as high as Ellies Head and who will let children ride him as well as any boddy." He ends with "if we succeed i hoap for better Digings on Deck than I have long since been accustomed to I will try and write often Mr H will remail yours by order I trust I have you co-operation. ... I have written bad on bad paper which i have carried some 150 [miles?]"

Notes: settlement; native american; fish, mine

Bio/History: There is little biographical information about Eli Knapp beyond what can be deduced from this letter. He evidently came to California somewhat prior to 1855, possibly from a town called Windsor, state unknown, and had spent some time in Grass Valley. He left a family including his wife, Mabel, and two sons, Elliott and Horace. There is also a reference to extended family members, "Mother Knapp", "Pa", "Brother Alexander and Lady(?)", "Paul Grant", etc. Nor can we determine anything about his fate after 1855. There are several E. Knapps and variants in later census (1860 and 1870) -- but no definite identification is possible.

Unrestricted. Please credit California State Library. Preferred citation: Eli Knapp gold rush letter, 1855 May 27.

Biography (bio); Manuscript (mss)

 

 

Reference Type:  Book Section

Record Number: 489

Author: F. Kniffen

Year: 1939

Title: Pomo Geography

Editor: v. M. L. C. History

Short Title: Pomo Geography

Notes: hitch; fish; native american

 

 

Reference Type:  Thesis

Record Number: 385

Author: N. J. Knight

Year: 1985

Title: Microhabitata and Temperature Requirements of Hardhead (Mylopharodon Conocephalus) and Sacramento Squawfish (Ptyvhocheilus Grandis), with Notes for some Other Native California Stream Fishes

Place Published: United States -- California

University: University of California, Davis

Thesis Type: Ph.D.

Short Title: Microhabitata and Temperature Requirements of Hardhead (Mylopharodon Conocephalus) and Sacramento Squawfish (Ptyvhocheilus Grandis), with Notes for some Other Native California Stream Fishes

Accession Number: 8607598

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1985 K654 Shields UCD micro copy collections and special collections

Keywords: Ecology

Aquaculture

Fish production

Abstract: Hardhead (Mylopharodon conocephalus) and Sacramento squawfish (Ptychocheilus grandis) are large cyprinids native to the Sacramento-San Joaquin river system in California. Although squawfish are widely distributed, hardhead are more restricted and found only where squawfish are present. The microhabitats and temperature requirements of both species were studied to determine reasons for this phenomenon. Microhabitat data from 17 stream sites were compiled, including measurements on fish size, total water depth, fish focal point depth, focal point velocity, and substrate composition. The data were divided (120 mm SL) into two fish size categories. Total water depths were greater for adults over juveniles of both species. Substrates were primarily of the gravel-boulder range, with few differences between species or size classes. Principal components analyses were similar for both species--water velocity variables were important primarily and depth variables were important secondarily. Both species were found in slow water (<15 cm/s) of moderate depths (mostly 0.5-2.0 m) with most fish near the bottom or less than halfway up in the water column. Squawfish were observed in shallower water and closer to the substrate than hardhead. Temperature requirements of both species were determined by laboratory studies of acute temperature preferences, routine metabolic rates, and critical thermal maxima. Acute final temperature preferenda for hardhead and squawfish were 28.4 and 26.0(DEGREES)C, respectively, determined by linear regressions of preferred against five acclimation temperatures. Squawfish had higher and more variable metabolic rates at every acclimation temperature above 10(DEGREES)C. Partial results for hitch (Lavinia exilicauda), California roach (L. symmetricus), Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus), Sacramento perch (Archoplites interruptus), tule perch (Hysterocarpus traski) and Sacramento sucker (Catostomus occidentalis) are also presented. Critical thermal maxima were very consistent (e.g. low variability), ranging from 28.3(DEGREES)C for squawfish at 10(DEGREES)C to 38.1(DEGREES)C for hitch at 30(DEGREES)C. The laboratory results generally agree with field observations of activities and macrohabitats. Successful management of these native fishes depends on maintaining adequate summer stream temperatures (25-30(DEGREES)C). Although the hardhead-Sacramento squawfish association phenomenon could not directly be explained, this study is the first to quantitatively describe the microhabitat and temperature requirements of hardhead.

Notes: hitch; fish

 

-pg ii

            -hardhead and squawfish both native to sac-san Joaquin river system

            -hardhead only found where squawfish present (not vice versa)

            -preferred temperature, 28.4 C (hardhead), 26 C (squawfish)

-pg 33

            -slow moving water (less than 15 centimeters per second) except foraging and moving

            -occupy 50-200 cm depths

-pg 37

            -gravel-boulder substrate

            -juveniles like finer, shallower water

-pg 44

            -table 5, hardhead and squawfish comparisons

-pg 109

            -hitch, “warm, low elevation lakes, ponds and slow moving stretches of streams and rivers”

URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=752976011&Fmt=7&clientId=1567&RQT=309&VName=PQD

 

 

Reference Type:  Personal Communication

Record Number: 563

Author: T. Knight

Year: 2011

Title: Phone Interview

Description: Phone Interview of Terry Knight, outdoor sports writer for the Lake County Record-Bee, by Ryan Keiffer, RREA Intern

Date: 6/29/2011

Type: Phone Interview

Short Title: Phone Interview

Abstract: Bass feed heavily on Hitch, as shown in stomach contents of lake record Largemouth bass. Anglers use lures that imitate hitch, 5 inches long, technique known as "hitching or ripping". Bass are opportunistic predators and the bass population is cyclical. DFG has been conducting electroshocking for 20 years on lake. Silverside introduced by vector control. Plankton drift on the lake, hitch and silversides follow. Threadfin shad, cyclical fish as well with current low numbers. He feels  that the # of birds represents # of bait fish present. Pelicans can consume 4 lbs. of fish a day, currently low numbers of pelicans and cormorants. Ospreys, grebes, etc. Told to look up commercial fishing harvest for blackfish and carp, knows of a father and son team.Very minimal tribal fishing recently.

Research Notes: Continued to correspond via email after the phone interview.

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 386

Author: E. F. Knipling

Year: 1950

Title: Some personal observations on the treatment of Clear Lake, California for the control of the Clear Lake gnat

Journal: Mosquito News

Volume: 10

Issue: (1)

Pages: 16-19

Date: 1950

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Some personal observations on the treatment of Clear Lake, California for the control of the Clear Lake gnat

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19502400038064

Call Number: call # - QL461 .M6 Shields UCD

Abstract: TDE used as an emulsion concentrate containing 30% TDE, 10% Triton X-100 and 60% xylene was applied at the rate of 14.000 gals. in 2 days for the control of Chaoborus asticopus. A good kill was obtained and early indications were that the gnat had been brought under control, possibly for one year. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: Irving Fox

Notes: insects; pollution

 

-pg 16

            -clear lake gnat (Chaoborus astictopus)

            -nuisance in summer months, evenings

            -causes increase in spiders

            -1938, “congress funds bureau of entomology and plant quarantine to study control and biology of gnat”

-pg 17

            -1 part to 100 million parts water, DDT and TDE are effective

            -september 15, 1949, first treatment on the lake (14,000 gallons)

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19502400038064

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 387

Author: D. L. C. J. J. C. G. P. K. V. Koch

Year: 1975

Title: Survey of the fishes of the Clear Lake Reservoir drainage

Series Title: Project report ;; no. 37; Variation: Project report (University of Nevada System. Water Resources Center) ;; no. 37.

Place Published: Reno

Publisher: Center for Water Resources Research, Desert Research Institute, University of Nevada System

Number of Pages: vi, 38 p.

Short Title: Survey of the fishes of the Clear Lake Reservoir drainage

Accession Number: OCLC: 22348811 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - G370 XU2 no.37 WRCA UCD

 

LC: TC424.N3

Keywords: Catostomidae -- Geographical distribution.

Fishes -- California -- Clear lake Reservoir -- Geographical distribution.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish; clear lake

ill. ; 28 cm. + 1 map.

Folded map in pocket./ "October 1975."

by David L. Koch, James J. Cooper, Glen P. Contreras and Vernon King.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 388

Author: A. L. Kroeber and L. R. Harry

Year: 1965

Title: University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology. Volume 18 (XVIII) 1922-1926

Place Published: New York

Publisher: Kraus Reprint

Number of Pages: 411 p.

Short Title: University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology. Volume 18 (XVIII) 1922-1926

Accession Number: OCLC: 39294250 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 94-3352 Arcv Neg UCB and E51 .C3 Main UCB and E51 .C3 set 2 Main UCB BOUND 1:2(1904)-50(1964)//At NRLF: v.1:2

 

LC: E51

Keywords: Pomo Indians.

Miwok Indians -- Rites and ceremonies.

Miwok Indians -- Religion.

Miwok dance.

Indian mythology -- California.

Indians of North America -- Languages.

Indians of North America -- Social life and customs.

Indians of North America -- California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: native american

maps ; 24 cm.

No. 1. California kinship terminologies / Edward Winslow Gifford -- no. 2. Clear Lake Pomo society / Edward Winslow Gifford -- no. 3. Miwok cults / Edward Winslow Gifford.

Reprint of v. 18 of the periodical originally published by the University of California, 1922-1926./ Includes bibliographical references and index.

American archaeology and ethnology

editors, A.L. Kroeber, Robert H. Lowie.

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 162

Author: R. D. Lallatin

Year: 1975

Title: Clear Lake water quality data

Place Published: [s.l.]

Publisher: State of California, The Resources Agency, Dept. of Water Resources, Northern District

Number of Pages: vi, 321 p.

Short Title: Clear Lake water quality data

ISBN: LCCN: 76-621855

Accession Number: OCLC: 2440985 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - TD224.C3 C22 PhySciEng  UCD

 

LC: TD224.C3; Dewey: 333.9/163/0979417

Keywords: Water quality -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake

California. Dept. of Water Resources. Northern District.

ill. ; 28 cm.

Cover title./ Prepared by R. D. Lallatin./ Bibliography: p. 19-20.

Government publication (gpb); State or province government publication (sgp)

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 501

Author: P. J. Lechler and D. G. Jewett

Year: 1999

Title: Geochemical Features of Water-Rock Interactions at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, Lake County, California

Type of Work: Symposium paper

Short Title: Geochemical Features of Water-Rock Interactions at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, Lake County, California

Accession Number: PB2000101743

Keywords: Clear Lake; Water chemistry; Oxidation reduction reactions;

Remediation; Acid mine drainage; Geochemistry; Ground water;

Subsurface drainage; Rock-fluid interactions; Chemical reactivity;

Water pollution control

Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine; Lake County(California); Herman Pit

68D Environmental Pollution & Control: Water Pollution &

Control; 48A Natural Resources & Earth Sciences: Mineral

Industries; 99F Chemistry: Physical & Theoretical Chemistry

Abstract: The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine on the eastern shore of Clear Lake is the source of poor quality acid mine drainage seeping into Clear Lake. Lateral and vertical geochemical trends in ground water composition point to a number of redox reactions taking place as a function of subsurface water-rock interactions. An understanding of these reactions suggests opportunities to remediate the acid mine drainage through suppression of undesirable geochemical reactions. Two geochemically based remediation steps are proposed.

Notes: geochemical; mine; pollution; clear lake

Performer: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno. Sponsor: National Risk Management Research Lab., Ada, OK. Subsurface Protection and Remediation Div. 1999. 10p. Report: EPA/600/A99/078

This document has been reproduced from the best copy furnished by the Source Agency. Sponsored by National Risk Management Research Lab., Ada, OK. Subsurface Protection and Remediation Div.

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 389

Author: Lee

Year: 1980

Title: California roach in d.s. lee, ed atlas of North American freshwater fishes

Publisher: North Carolina State Museum of Natural History, Raleigh

Short Title: California roach in d.s. lee, ed atlas of North American freshwater fishes

Call Number: call # - Ql625.a84 Shields UCD

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

Pg 200

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 390

Author: H. W. Li, P. B. Moyle and R. L. Garrett

Year: 1976

Title: Effect of Introduction of Mississippi Silverside (Menidia-Audens) on Growth of Black Crappie (Pomoxis-Nigromaculatus) and White Crappie (Pomoxis-Annularis) in Clear Lake, California

Journal: Transactions of the American Fisheries Society

Volume: 105

Issue: 3

Pages: 404-408

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Effect of Introduction of Mississippi Silverside (Menidia-Audens) on Growth of Black Crappie (Pomoxis-Nigromaculatus) and White Crappie (Pomoxis-Annularis) in Clear Lake, California

ISSN: 0002-8487

Accession Number: ISI:A1976CG14100008

Call Number: call # - SH1 .A5 Shields UCD

Abstract: The growth of black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) and of white crappie (P. annularis) before a new forage fish, the Mississippi silverside (Menidia audens), became established in Clear Lake, California, was compared to their growth after the silverside had become established. Following the establishment of the silverside, growth rates of both species were slower than the presilverside growth rates for the first two years of life, and were apparently faster beyond year II. No correlation was found between changes in climatological conditions and crappie growth patterns. The overall impact of the silverside on the crappie fishery in Clear Lake may be negative if increased juvenile mortality rates result from the smaller sizes observed at the younger age classes.

Notes: fish

 

-pg 404

            -younger age class of crappies are smaller

            -1967, silverside introduced to control gnats and midges and as a forage fish

-pg 406

            -table 3, lengths before and after introductions

            -ages 1-3, crappie smaller after introductions

            -ages 4-8, crappe larger after introductions

-pg 407

            -silverside introduction did effect crappie growth

            -gave more food for older crappie (ate silversides) but harmed younger due to competition for zooplankton

            -can create problems with fecundity, juvenile mortality

            -crappie fishing is big

            -1915, black crappie introduced

            -1950’s, white crappie introduced

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1976CG14100008

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 6

Reporter: J. Lindblom

Year: 2004

Title: A break for the hitch

Newspaper: Lake County Record Bee (Lakeport, CA)

Issue Date: December 28, 2004

Short Title: A break for the hitch

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: hitch; html via newsbank; see "newspapers"

Provider: NewsBank, SQN: 2622004

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 391

Author: A. W. Lindquist, C. C. Deonier and J. E. Hancey

Year: 1943

Title: The relationship of fish to the Clear Lake Gnat, in Clear Lake, California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 29

Issue: 4

Pages: 196-202

Date: 1943

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: The relationship of fish to the Clear Lake Gnat, in Clear Lake, California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19441800002106

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: 17 spp. of fish taken in Clear Lake are listed. The digestive tracts from 355 fish comprising 10 spp. were examined. All stages of Chaoborus were found in 9 spp. of fish, but it is believed that all spp. feed on this insect at some time during their life. The fork-tail catfish, square-tail catfish and split-tail are important feeders on all stages of the gnat. As many as 1,076 larvae have been found in the stomach of a 9-inch fish; several thousands have been estimated in the intestine. Nearly 77% of the stomachs of the square-tail catfish that contained food material had Chaoborus larvae; 100% of the intestines showed larval remains. Indications of abundance of various species of fish were sought from gill net catches, spawning runs, commercial seining, and illegal fishing. Clear Lake apparently harbors an enormous fish population. Data on the water chemistry are given. ABSTRACT AUTHORS: A. W. Lindquist

Notes: fish; insects; clear lake

 

-pg 196

            -about 40,000 acres (clear lake area)

            -greatest depth is 27 feet (upper), 50 feet (lower)

            -fish as control of gnats

-pg 197

            -fishes present in clear lake

                        -white catfish, bluegill, black crappie, sacramento perch, hitch, splittail, german carp, largemouth black bass, green sunfish, blackfish, sacramento chub, squawfish, sacramento sucker, sculpin, perch

-pg 199

            -hitch young eat gnat

-pg 200

            -reports of fish kills (1 ft high, several ft wide)

            -thousands on shore in 1940

            -splittail and hitch runs are large

                        -tens of thousands

                        -solid mass up a 4 ft wide creek

            -abundances (1938)

                        -splittail>hitch>carp>fork tailed catfish>sacramento perch

-pg 201

            -chemical analysis of water

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19441800002106

Author Address: U. S. Dept. Agric.

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 392

Author: A. W. Lindquist, A. R. Roth and J. R. Walker

Year: 1951

Title: Control of the Clear Lake Gnat in California

Journal: Journal of Economic Entomology

Volume: 44

Issue: 4

Pages: 572-577

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Control of the Clear Lake Gnat in California

ISSN: 0022-0493

Accession Number: ISI:A1951UJ47500028

Call Number: call # - SB599 .J6 Shields UCD

Notes: insects; pollution

 

-pg 572

            -TDE, effective vs gnats, ok for fish

            -treatment September 15, 1949

                        -larvae still migrating from mud to water each night

                        -adult activity over

                        -water level low

                        -think this is less harmful time for fish

            -14,000 gallons

            -specifics of chemicals and application

-pg 573

            -also treated 20 ponds, reservoirs, small lakes within 15 miles of clear lake during September, October and November

            -once killed, float on surface for about 11 days

            -by 13th day few adults seen around lights (due to treatment and normal decline)

-pg 574

            -10-18 days after treatment, most parts of clear lake <0.0025 ppm

                        -this still kills gnat larvae

            -75 days, bottom mud samples, no larvae kill

            -within 28 days, some TDE settled at bottom

            -between 4-24 days, 100% kill

            -11th day, no gnat larvae

-pg 576

            -apparent eradication for at least one season

            -late summer, did find some larvae

                        -lake is retreated

            -no apparent injury to other aquatic insects, fish, plankton, oligochaetes

            -biological unbalance?

                        -gnat eats rotifera and copepoda

                        -gnat as food

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1951UJ47500028

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 393

Author: J. D. Linn and R. L. Stanley

Year: 1969

Title: Tde Residues in Clear Lake Animals

Short Title: Tde Residues in Clear Lake Animals

Accession Number: 7001935

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Keywords: *chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide; *pesticide residues; bass;

bullheads; gulls; california; catfishes; plankton; sunfishes; gas

chromatography; water pollution sources; water pollution effects;

*ddd; *tde; black crappie; goldeneye; grebe; merganser; sacramento

perch; clear lake(calif); tetrachloro-diphenyl-ethane;

dichloro-diphenyl-dichlorethane

SW 3030 Effects of pollution; SW 3010 Identification of pollutants

Abstract: Thirteen collections taken from clear lake, california, between 1959 and 1965, comprising eight fish species, four bird species and one plankton sample, were analyzed for tde (ddd) residues. colorimetric method (before 1962) and electron capture gas chromatography were used to determine concentrations of pesticide. no well-defined year-to-year trend in residue levels was noted when all samples were examined together. white catfish showed some tendency toward increased residue levels with increasing age, while mean annual tde residue in largemouth bass (1958 year class) decreased from 23.5 parts/million (ppm) in 1958 to 7 ppm in 1963. evidence indicates that tde contamination, originating from three applications for insect control in 1949, 1954 and 1957, is declining. mean annual levels in white catfish have declined from 85.7 ppm (1958) to 9.6 ppm (1965) and levels in largemouth bass have declined from 40.9 ppm (1958) to 12.2 ppm (l963). tabular data include results of flesh and fat analyses for all collections and a comparison of data derived by colorimetric and gas chromatographic methods. (voigtlander-wisconsin)

Notes: fish; pollution; birds; chemistry

California fish and game, vol 55, no 3, p 164-178, 1969. 1 fig, 13 tab, 5 ref.

 

-pg 164

            -levels declined through the years

            -1,000 ppm TDE reported in some fish and birds (grebes, bass, catfish)

-pg 165

            -sample collection

                        -largemouth bass, white catfish, brown bullhead, black crappie, green sunfish, sacramento perch, sacramento blackfish, hitch

                        -western grebe, gulls, common goldeneye, common merganser

                        -plankton

            -tables of tissue analysis

-pg 167

            -variety of TDE presence in each individual

-pg 168

            -no grebe die offs since 1957

            -decrease in TDE levels since 1958 in bass

            -white catfish, TDE levels fluctuate, older fish have higher levels

-pg 171

            -TDE contamination in animals is decreasing

Author Address: CALIFORNIA STATE DEPT. OF FISH AND GAME, SACRAMENTO. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT BRANCH; AND CALIFORNIA STATE DEPT. OF PUBLIC HEALTH, SACRAMENTO. FOOD AND DRUG LAB

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 394

Author: E. E. Littrell

Year: 1991

Title: Mercury in Western Grebes at Lake Berryessa and Clear Lake, California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 77

Issue: 3

Pages: 142-144

Date: Sum

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Mercury in Western Grebes at Lake Berryessa and Clear Lake, California

ISSN: 0008-1078

Accession Number: ISI:A1991HG21100002

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Keywords: BIRDS

Abstract: Mortalities of western grebes(Aechmophorus occidentalis) occurred at Lake Berryessa, Napa County, California in 1982 and 1986. Kidney and liver tissues of those birds and others from Lake Berryessa and Clear Lake were analyzed to determine if mercury, known to occur in these locations, was present at deleterious levels. Residue analyses indicated mercury was present at hazardous levels (20 ppm, wet weight) in the two instances.

Notes: birds; bioaccumulation; clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1991HG21100002

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 395

Author: D. L. Luce

Year: 1977

Title: Clear Lake, California water problems

Place Published: [Marysville, Calif.]

Publisher: Yuba Community College District

Number of Pages: 1 v. (various pagings)

Short Title: Clear Lake, California water problems

Accession Number: OCLC: 56823900 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - 333.91 LUCE Lakeport Lib, Redbud Lib

 

Dewey: 333.91

Keywords: Water-supply -- California -- Clear Lake.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: water rights; clear lake

Yuba Community College District (Calif.)

28 cm.

Cover title.

[David L. Luce].

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 507

Author: M. G. Lynch

Year: 1996

Title: Seasonal variations in lake mixing : Clear Lake, California

Pages: 90 leaves

Date: 1996

Type of Work: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19990420

Short Title: Seasonal variations in lake mixing : Clear Lake, California

Accession Number: OCLC: 41220817 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - LD781.D5j 1996 L962 Shields UCD micro copy collections and special collections

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake

ill. Dissertation: Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Davis, 1996.

Degree granted in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

by Michelle Gwen Lynch.

Thesis/dissertation (deg); Manuscript (mss)

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 505

Author: J. L. Macalady, E. E. Mack, D. C. Nelson and K. M. Scow

Year: 2000

Title: Sediment microbial community structure and mercury methylation in mercury-polluted Clear Lake, California

Journal: Applied and Environmental Microbiology

Volume: 66

Issue: 4

Pages: 1479-1488

Date: Apr

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Sediment microbial community structure and mercury methylation in mercury-polluted Clear Lake, California

Alternate Journal: Appl. Environ. Microbiol.

ISSN: 0099-2240

Accession Number: ISI:000086284700035

Keywords: SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA

CANONICAL CORRESPONDENCE-ANALYSIS

PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY-ACID

DESULFOVIBRIO-DESULFURICANS

MULTIVARIATE-ANALYSIS

ESTUARINE SEDIMENT

COMPOSITIONAL DATA

RIBOSOMAL-RNA

POPULATIONS

BIOMARKERS

Abstract: Spatial and temporal variations in sediment microbial community structure in a eutrophic lake polluted with inorganic mercury were identified using polar lipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, Microbial community structure was strongly related to mercury methylation potential , sediment organic carbon content, and lake location. Pore a ater sulfate, total mercury concentrations, and organic matter C/N ratios showed no relation ships with microbial community structure. Seasonal changes and changes potentially attributable to temperature regulation of bacterial membranes were detectable but were less important influences on sediment PLFA composition than were differences due to lake sampling location. Analysis of biomarker PLFAs characteristic of Desulfobacter and Desulfovibrio groups of sulfate-reducing bacteria suggests that Desulfobacter-like organisms are important mercury methylators in the sediments, especially in the Lower Arm of Clear Lake.

Notes: algae

 

ISI Document Delivery No.: 300ZY

Times Cited: 38

Cited Reference Count: 49

AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY

URL: <Go to ISI>://000086284700035

Author Address: Univ Calif Davis, Dept Land Air & Water Resources, Davis, CA 95616 USA. Univ Calif Davis, Dept Microbiol, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Macalady, JL, Univ Calif Davis, Dept Land Air & Water Resources, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Language: English

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 396

Author: J. Macclanahan, E. W. Danley, H. F. Dewitt and W. Wolber

Year: 1972

Title: Flood Control Project Maintenance and Repair -- 1971 Inspection Report

Short Title: Flood Control Project Maintenance and Repair -- 1971 Inspection Report

Accession Number: 7401945

Call Number:call # - ERA

Keywords: *flood control; *levees; *california; engineering structures;

maintenance; repairing; channel improvement; flood protection; data

collections

SW 6040 Soil mechanics; SW 2010 Control of water on the surface

Abstract: In 1971, flood control levees extending 1,540 miles were maintained under cooperative state and federal agreements in the sacramento and san joaquin valleys and in lake and placer counties. such flood control projects include the sacramento, american, san joaquin, calaveras, and truckee rivers; littlejohns and middle creeks; merced county stream group; sacramento river bank protection project, and the lower san joaquin flood control project; and the fresno county stream group. twice during 1971, department of water resources specialists inspected and classified the quality of levee maintenance performed by maintaining agencies. this bulletin reports both the 1971 ratings and the method of rating, discusses proper maintenance procedures, and reports levee construction by the u.s. army corps of engineers, channel maintenance, applications for levee encroachments, and the condition of the flood control project structures. maps locate project levees and local maintenance agencies. (woodard-usgs)

Notes: flood control; tributary

Available from state of calif, documents section, p.o. box 20191 sacramento, calif. 95820 price $1.00. bulletin no. 149-71, june 1972. 29 p, 8 tab.

 

-           Pg 6

- Summary of maintenance ratings by project (table 1). Middle creek, 14.3 miles of levee. Maintenance rating (% of miles) 49% good, 51% fair

-           Pg 17

- 20 year levee maintenance record (1951-’70) (table 3). 1971 good

-           Pg 24

- Levee maintenance (table 5). Middle, scotts, clover

-           Pg 26

- Project structures (table 7)

    - Middle creek pumping plant. Gravity control gate not repaired

    - Clover outlet structure (Lake County FCD controls)

-           Pg 29

- Channel clearance and condition. Middle maintained by DWR

Author Address: CALIFORNIA STATE DEPT. OF WATER RESOURCES, SACRAMENTO

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 397

Author: R. Macedo

Year: 1991

Title: Creel Survey at Clear Lake, California, March-June, 1988

Institution: California Department of Fish and Game

Document Number: 91-3

Date: 1991

Short Title: Creel Survey at Clear Lake, California, March-June, 1988

Call Number:call # - F660 .A3 91-3 CSL

Keywords: creel census; habitat alterations; lakes; management/research; shoreline development; stocking/introductions

Abstract: Clear Lake is the largest and oldest lake completely within the California border. It supports a complex warmwater fishery and is a popular lake for both novice and professional anglers. The objective of this study was to update the description of the spring sport fishery of Clear Lake by documenting catch composition by size and species, angler success, angler origin, and tournament activity. Boat anglers were interviewed from March 2 through June 26, 1988. Of the 31 fish species which inhabit Clear Lake, 11 were noted during this survey. Largemouth bass dominated the catch (67%), followed by bluegill (15%), and crappie (6%). Catfishes, Sacramento hitch, carp and Sacramento perch together comprised 12% of the total sport catch. Catch per unit effort for largemouth bass taken in Clear Lake is 0.21 fish/h. Catch per unit effort is 0.25 fish/h when largemouth bass is the target species.

Notes: fish

 

-pg 1

            - percent of species by catch

                        - bass (67%), bluegill (15%), crappie (6%), catfish/hitch/carp/perch ( 12%)

-pg 2

            -about 2.5 million years old

            -elevation is 1,319 feet

            -surface area is 43,663 acres

            -average depth is 21.3 feet with a max of 59 feet

            -18 miles long, 7 miles wide at its widest

-pg 3

            -clear lake had green, yellow-green, and blue-green algae (~100 species total)

            -table 1, list of fish species in clear lake

-pg 7

            -11 of 31 fish in clear lake accounted for

-pg 8

            -species composition (1969 and 1988)

-pg 10-11

            -pie charts, species compositions by quadrant

-pg 12-21

            -fig 6, species composition

-pg 22

            -table 3, fork lengths by species and quadrant

-pg 27

            -splittail and threespine stickleback may be extinct

            -trout may only be there if water is warm enough

-pg 28

            -resurgence of sacramento perch to 1% in 1988 from <1% in 1976 and 1969

            -recent decline in crappie density

            -bluegill, crappie, and catfish eat perch eggs

            -1972, crappie is 56% of catch, 1988 they are 6%

            -1969, crappie and bluegill are 79% of catch, 1988 they are 21%

-pg 29

            -silverside introduction may be reason for crappie decline

            -1985, introduction of florida black crappie

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 398

Author: R. Macedo

Year: 1994

Title: Swimming Upstream without a Hitch

Journal: Outdoor California

Volume: 55

Pages: 1-5

Date: January-February 1994

Short Title: Swimming Upstream without a Hitch

Abstract: Found only in California's oldest and largest natural lake, the Clear Lake hitch is a little known member of the minnow family. Fishery biologist Richard Macedo talks about what we're doing to help this fish survive.

Notes: hitch

 

-“trash fish,” seemingly useless

-minnow family, Lavinia exilicauda chi

-adults, 14 inches, greater than 1 pound

-2 other subspecies in drainages of sacramento-san Joaquin rivers and Monterey bay

            -differences

                        -larger eyes, deeper body (better for clear lake environment)

-possibly some in russian river, nearly entire population in clear lake and tributaries

-species of special concern

-life history

            -diet

                        -plankton, gnats, midges, etc

            -spawning, draws predators

                        -spring, mid February to july head up tributaries

            -female seeks shallow area near bank with silt free gravel, overhanging vegetation (willow, blackberry)

                        -1 female and 5 males, fertilization

            -return spawn unlikely due to stress and predation

            -not nest builders

            -eggs swell four times and sink to stream bed, eggs settle along bed, some swept to clear lake (low survival rate)

            -egg hatches 5-10 days

            -need 5-10 days to become proficient swimmer

            -then juveniles migrate to clear lake

            -in clear lake juveniles stay along shore, concealed (few months)

            -80 days, 2 inches, leave shore to roam

            -male, sexual maturity 1-2 years

            -female, 2-3 years

            -live 5 or more years

-tributaries dry in summer therefore hitch must beat this

-threats

            -dams (because build up of eggs, eggs on bottom die), bridges (not designed with hitch in mind)

            -introduction of non native fish

            -agricultural irrigation and diversions (homes)

-dams

            -adobe, highland creeks, block upstream access

            -kelsey, open during spawning, still alters stream morphology

 

 

Reference Type:  Generic

Record Number: 498

Author: H. K. Mauldin

Title: Lake County History

Short Title: Lake County History

Call Number: found in Lake County Museum`

Notes: -           Pg 505

- 1910-very big run of hitch on Kelsey at spawning time. Stream dried up and they died

-           Pg 522

- Indians caught fish with spear and mullen root

-           Pg 742

- Hitch in Kelsey so abundant, boy spears 9 with a pitch fork

-           Pg 841

- Indians camped along creek, caught hitch (very thick) by long seine

    - 2 on each side and pull seine through deep hole (get lots of fish)

    - dry and cure fish by sticking in tules

    - there as long as run went, came from everywhere, mostly upper lake

-           Pg 1088

- 1900-carp thick in lake

- 1930’s-good hitch run in Kelsey, last mile of stream had many dead fish. Not sure why, not due to low water

- 1912-pike/Pikeminnow thickest in Kelsey

-           Pg 1154

- 1951-spawning for fish between march and june

-           Pg 1230

- Splittail (chai) went up cole and hitch went up Kelsey

-           Pg 1552

- Fish important part of diet

- had fishing poles

-           Pg 1744

- Early 1900’s-big hitch run on Kelsey but stream ran dru and many died

- (Murphy 1948 “Perch”)-hitch young move offshore in middle of summer

-           Pg 1853

- 1911-24,000 rainbow trout, 68,000 steelhead distributed

- 1912-30,000 rainbow trout in kelsey

- 1913-10,000 eastern brook trout in kelsey

- 1916-46,500 rainbow trout, 48,000 eastern brook trout, 148,500 steelhead

-           Ph 1855

- 1922-60,000 rainbow trout

- 1923-50,000 german brown, 60,000 mackinaw, 20,000 rainbow trout, 250,000 steelhead

- 1924-55,000 rainbow trout, 150,000 lock leven, 15,000 steelhead, 100,000 german brown, 75,000 mackinaw

- 1928-4,000 channel catfish

-           Pg 1856

- 1927-12,000 rainbow trout, 49,000 lock leven, 175,000 german brown

- 1926-20,000 rainbow trout, 12,000 lock leven, 15,500 eastern brook trout, 310,000 german brown, 120,000 steelhead

-           Pg 2027

- Fish clubs via indians

-           Pg 2563

- 1948-hitch numbers very low

-           Pg 5013

- 1896-big mouth bass, yellow perch, banded pickerel, green sunfish introductions

-           Pg 5089

- Fish taken by Indians with traps and sedge net seines

-           Pg 5538

- 1971-many hitch in Kelsey

-           Pg 6533

- Picture by father of Wallace Meddough april 29, 1899 (of fish stranded)

-           Pg 8149

- June 3, 1880-104 lbs perch caught

-           Pg 8378

- 1922-1930-2 ft high dam (un named creek) on vest pond (terraces-by metaxes estate) had hitch

-           Pg 8405

- 1894-CL fish: pacific lamprey. Rainbow trout, splittail, blackfish, hitch, Pikeminnow, chub, sacramento sucker, three spine stickleback, perch, Sculpin

- 1878-1000 catfish place in Clear Lake (ok by cfc)

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 399

Author: H. K. Mauldin

Year: 1968

Title: History of Clear Lake, Mt. Konocti and Lake County cattle industry

Series Editor: A. B. Shannon

Place Published: Kelseyville

Publisher: Calif., Anderson Printing

Number of Pages: 79 p. illus. 22 cm.

Short Title: History of Clear Lake, Mt. Konocti and Lake County cattle industry

Accession Number: OCLC: 70430817 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - F868.L2 M3 1968 Shields UCD and CAL 3:19 Shields UCD special collections

Keywords: Lake County, California -- History.

Konocti, Mt.

Clear Lake, California.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: settlement

Cover title.

[Edited by Ben Shannon Allen. Rev.

Book

 

-           Pg 7

- Clear Lake overflow into east fork of Russian river

-           Pg 8

- Cache Creek flows to Sac River, drained lower portion of lake

- There was an upper and lower portion of the lake

-           Pg 9

- Upper portion drainage by cold creek into Russian river

-           Pg 10

- Landslide filled gorge of cold creek, result was a connection of upper and lower portions of the lake

 

 

Reference Type:  Manuscript

Record Number: 400

Author: C. F. May

Year: 1917

Title: Conservation, flood controll [sic] and irrigation, 1917 July 10

Pages: 8 leaves ; 34 cm.

Date: 1917

Type of Work: Book; Archival Material Date of Entry: 19980501

Short Title: Conservation, flood controll [sic] and irrigation, 1917 July 10

Abbreviation: Conservation, flood control and irrigation

Accession Number: OCLC: 39048632 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - MS 86/7 459.3.8c WRCS UCB

Keywords: Water conservation -- California -- Lake County.

Flood control -- California -- Lake County.

Irrigation -- California -- Lake County.

Water rights -- California -- Lake County.

Water rights -- California -- Yolo County.

Yolo Power and Water Company.

Clear Lake (Lake County, Calif.) -- Water rights.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: flood control; settlement

Typescript (carbon).

[Chas. F. May].

Manuscript (mss)

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 168

Author: R. McAlear

Year: 1982

Title: 1860 census, Clear Lake Township, Napa County, California : with additions and corrections

Place Published: Decorah, Iowa (108 Washington St., Decorah 52101)

Publisher: Anundsen Pub. Co.

Number of Pages: ii, 16 leaves

Short Title: 1860 census, Clear Lake Township, Napa County, California : with additions and corrections

ISBN: LCCN: 82-134611

Accession Number: OCLC: 9155019 Provider: OCLC

Call Number: call # - F869.C562 M36 1982 State lib CSL Ca Non Circ

 

LC: F869.C57; Dewey: 929/.379417

Keywords: Registers of births, etc. -- California -- Clear Lake (Township)

Registers of births, etc. -- California -- Lake County.

Clear Lake (Calif. : Township) -- Genealogy.

Lake County (Calif.) -- Genealogy.

Clear Lake (Calif. : Township) -- Census, 1860.

United States -- Census, 8th, 1860.

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: clear lake; settlement

28 cm.

Includes index.

compiled by Robert McAlear. More Records: Show record information

Book

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 401

Author: G. W. McCammon, D. A. La Faunce and C. M. Seeley

Year: 1964

Title: Observations on the food of fingerling largemouth bass in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 50

Issue: (3)

Pages: 158-169

Date: 1964

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Observations on the food of fingerling largemouth bass in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19644500094338

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shileds UCD

Abstract: During mid-Aug. of 1948, 1956, 1957, and 1958, fingerling largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were collected and their stomach contents analyzed. Mean fork lengths ranged from 2.1 inches in 1956 to 3.6 inches in 1958. Plankton and insects were the most important foods for bass under 2.5 inches fork length, while fish became the major food for larger bass. In 1948, Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus) were the major food item with bluegills (Lepomis macrochirus) of only minor importance. In all later collections, blue-gills constituted over half of the fish consumed, and were the most important single item. Blackfish, with one exception, were not found in any of the stomachs examined during the later studies. ABSTRACT AUTHORS: Authors

Notes: fish; clear lake

 

-pg 158

            -1948, blackfish fishery banned to leave them for bass food

            -1950, golden shiner introduced

-pg 160

            -fish were main food for bass

            -change in food with growth

                        -2-4 inches they begin to eat fish, if small enough forage fish available they will eat it

-pg 163

            -figure, food of bass in clear lake

-pg 164

            -table, food of bass in clear lake

 -pg 168

            -2.5 inches eat plankton and insects

            -range 2.1-3.6 inches

            -1948, blackfish most important food, next is bluegill

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19644500094338

Author Address: Calif. Dep. Fish and Game, Sacramento, Calif., USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 402

Author: G. W. McCammon and C. M. Seeley

Year: 1961

Title: Survival, mortality, and movements of white catfish and brown bull-heads in Clear Lake California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 47

Issue: (3)

Pages: 237-255

Date: 1961

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Survival, mortality, and movements of white catfish and brown bull-heads in Clear Lake California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19613600070964

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: In August and September of 1952, 722 white catfish and 724 brown bullheads were single-tagged with disk-dangler, staple, or hydrostatic tags. Anglers voluntarily returned 15.2% of the white catfish tags and 6.5% of the brown bullhead tags. Additional tagging was done in 1954-55. It was found that huge underfished stocks of these fish exist in Clear Lake. Hydrostatic tags proved unsuitable for long-term mortality studies. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: C. M. Ferrel

Notes: fish; clear lake

 

-pg 237

            -white catfish and brown bullhead (more abundant), important part of fishery

-pg 238

            -successful depth was 15-30 feet

-pg 239

            -white catfish, 6.3-18.5 inches (10.4 inch mean) length

            -brown bullhead, 6.6-13.9 inches (9.8 inch mean) length

-pg 244

            -white catfish have high survival rate

-pg 246

            -white catfish and brown bullhead, no seasonal and annual movement but do disperse

-pg 255

            -huge stocks of white catfish and brown bullhead in clear lake

URL: <Go to ISI>://BIOSIS:PREV19613600070964

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 403

Author: S. M. McGinnis

Year: 1984

Title: Freshwater fishes of California

Publisher: Univ. calif. Press, Berkeley.

Number of Pages: 316 p

Short Title: Freshwater fishes of California

Call Number: call # - QL628.C2 M37 1984 Shields UCD

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: fish

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 404

Author: S. a. M. J. L. McLendon

Title: Eastern Pomo and Southeastern Pomo

Series Title: In Handbook of North American Indians

Publisher: Smithsonian Institution. Washington D.C.

Volume: Volume 8, pp 306-323

Short Title: Eastern Pomo and Southeastern Pomo

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: native american

 

 

Reference Type:  Newspaper Article

Record Number: 8

Reporter: K. Mintz

Year: 2006

Title: River restoration projects celebrated

Newspaper: Ukiah Daily Journal (CA)

Short Title: River restoration projects celebrated

Abstract: need abstract

Notes: html online via newsbank

Provider: NewsBank, SQN: 3976907

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 562

Author: J. Moreau, Ligtvoet, W., Palomares, M.L.D.

Year: 1993.

Title: Trophic Relationship in the Fish Community of Lake Victoria, Kenya, with Emphasis on the Impact of Nile Perch (Lates niloticus)

Journal: In V. Christensen and D. Pauly (Eds)

Volume: Trophic Models of Aquatic Ecosystems

Pages: 144-152

Short Title: Trophic Relationship in the Fish Community of Lake Victoria, Kenya, with Emphasis on the Impact of Nile Perch (Lates niloticus)

Original Publication: ICLARM

Research Notes: Manila

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 488

Author: J. Moss

Year: 1989

Title: Hitching

Journal: News from Native California

Volume: 3

Issue: 3

Pages: 1

Start Page: 13

Date: July/August 1989

Short Title: Hitching

Notes: hitch; native american

 

-pg 13

            -people would collect enough hitch in 10 days (usual length of a run) to last a year

            -catch with both hands, don’t club them because it ruins the meat

            -1989, over three days a class caught over 100 hitch

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 405

Author: P. B. Moyle, S.B. Mathews and N. Bonderson

Year: 1975

Title: Feeding habits of the Sacramento perch, Archoplites interruptus

Journal: Transactions of the American Fisheries Society

Volume: 103

Issue: 2

Pages: 399-402

Short Title: Feeding habits of the Sacramento perch, Archoplites interruptus

Call Number: call # - SH1.A5

Abstract: Examination of 510 stomachs of Sacramento perch from five localities showed that they feed primarily by picking insect larvae and snails from the bottom and aquatic plants or by capturing zooplankton, fish, or emerging insects in midwater. The diet varies with season and size of fish but no daily feeding rhythms were found. Similarity of their diet to that of bluegill indicates that Sacramento perch may have been eliminated from their native habitat through competitive interactions with bluegill.

Notes: fish

 

-pg 399

            -sacramento perch eat

                        -larvae, snails, zooplankton, fish

-pg 400

            -diet varies with the season

            -may have been out competed by bluegill

 

 

Reference Type:  Report

Record Number: 406

Author: P. B. Moyle, R.M. Yoshiyama, J.E. Williams and E.D. Wikramanayake

Year: 1995

Title: Fish Species of Special Concern in California

Series Editor: S. Edition

Series Title: Prepared for the State of California, The Resources Agency, Department of Fish and Game, Inland Fisheries Division Rancho Cordova.

 

Short Title: Fish Species of Special Concern in California

Call Number:call # - DOC-CA F660 .S63 1995 Shields UCD gov info stacks

Notes: fish

 

-HITCH

-           Pg 153

- 1992-hitch run in mid February to may/june when streams dried

-           Pg 154

- 1995-Major streams for hitch spawning (Kelsey>adobe>seigler>middle>scotts>manning>cole)

- 1993-spawning in ditches (wet year)

- 1990-excellent run in Kelsey

- 1991-weaker run but substantial numbers persist

- 1995-still common in lake

- 1992-good runs in seigler, Kelsey, adobe

- 1993-fewer in each creek bc they were more dispersed between more creeks

-           Pg 155

- 1988-shad 70% of catch in LCVC seines

- Kelsey 6 barriers

    - Retention dam (2-3 miles from lake)

    - Further, a concrete bridge with culverts

    - Main street Kelseyville bridge

    - “drop structures” for gravel aggradations

- seigler barriers

    - exposed sewer pipe

    - one road crossing

- adobe has one barrier

-California Roach (Pg 158)

-Splittail

-           Pg 164

- Early 1970’s-extinct from CL

-Sac Perch

-           Pg 227

- Spawn May-June (Murphy 1948b)

 

 

Reference Type:  Book

Record Number: 407

Author: P. B. Moyle

Year: 2002

Title: Inland fishes of California 

Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, c2002

Edition: Rev. and expanded

Short Title: Inland fishes of California 

Call Number: call # - QL628.C2 M68 2002 Shields UCD

Notes: fish; hitch

 

 

Reference Type:  Book Section

Record Number: 564

Author: P. B. Moyle

Year: 2002

Title: Inland Fishes of California

Book Title: Inland Fishes of California

 

Place Published: Berkeley

Publisher: University of California Press-Berkeley

Pages: 49

Edition: Revised and Expanded

Short Title: Inland Fishes of California

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 408

Author: P. B. Moyle and N. J. Holzhauser

Year: 1978

Title: Effects of Introduction of Mississippi Silverside (Menidia-Audens) and Florida Largemouth Bass (Micropterus-Salmoides-Floridanus) on Feeding-Habits of Young-of-Year Largemouth Bass in Clear Lake, California

Journal: Transactions of the American Fisheries Society

Volume: 107

Issue: 4

Pages: 574-582

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: Effects of Introduction of Mississippi Silverside (Menidia-Audens) and Florida Largemouth Bass (Micropterus-Salmoides-Floridanus) on Feeding-Habits of Young-of-Year Largemouth Bass in Clear Lake, California

ISSN: 0002-8487

Accession Number: ISI:A1978FS34600010

Call Number: call # - SH1 .A5 Shields UCD

Abstract: Young-of-year largemouth bass in Clear Lake, California, switched from feeding largely on bluegill (Lepomis

macrochirus) to feeding largely on Mississippi silverside or on a mixture of prey species following the establishment of

the silverside in the lake in 1967. Choice of prey, however, was influenced by relative abundance of the prey, the

habitat occupied by the bass, time of day, and size of the bass. The bass usually switched to a predominantly fish diet at

a smaller size when silversides were the main prey than when bluegill or Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus) were the main prey. The success of the introduction of small numbers of Florida largemouth bass into the lake in 1969-1971 was demonstrated by the presence of significant numbers of bass that could be classified as intergrades between Florida and northern largemouth bass (M.s. salmoides), the subspecies originally introduced into Clear Lake. No meaningful differences in the feeding habits or average lengths of the intergrades and "pure" northern bass were found.

Notes: fish; hitch

 

-pg 574

            -1967, silversides introduced

                        -bass switched from feeding mostly on bluegill to mostly silversides or a mixture

            -choice of prey depends on abundance of prey, habitat occupied by bass, time of day, size of bass

            -bass ate fish if prey was small enough

            -1969-1971, florida largemouth bass introduction by department of fish and game (DFG), 1436 total

            -1880, start of introductions

            -originally 13 species

            -now 14 introduced species (9 game fish)

            -1950, golden shiner introduced as forage fish but failed to become abundant

            -1948, commercial blackfish banned, 1954 reinstated

            -by 1968, silversides most abundant in lake, is major prey of game fishes

-pg 575

            -1975, 40,000 northern bass planted by resort owners

            -table 1, percentage of fishes in seines by species

-pg 576

            -results, more silversides than bluegills

            -table 2, diet data by species (1948-1975)

-pg 579

            -most feeding occurs during the day (diurnal)

                        -morning, zooplankton important to diet rest of day for fish

            -ultimately they will eat what’s present (opportunistic)

-pg 581

            -crappie growth rates lower after silverside introduction in 1st 2 years of life

                        -competition for zooplankton. Then they switch to silversides

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1978FS34600010

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 409

Author: P. B. Moyle and M. Massingill

Year: 1981

Title: Hybridization between Hitch, Lavinia-Exilicauda, and Sacramento Blackfish, Orthodon-Microlepidotus, in San Luis Reservoir, California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 67

Issue: 3

Pages: 196-198

Short Title: Hybridization between Hitch, Lavinia-Exilicauda, and Sacramento Blackfish, Orthodon-Microlepidotus, in San Luis Reservoir, California

ISSN: 0008-1078

Accession Number: ISI:A1981LX48400005

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: Introduction

Hybridization between species of Cyprinidae is'a comm~n occurrence in North America, but large numbers of any hybrid combination are rarely found (Schwartz 1972). Few hybrids have been found among the 10 species of native cyprinids found in the Sacramento-San joaquin drainage of central California. Alii known cases of hybridization involve the hitch, Lavinia exilicauda, which has been reported to hybridize with thicktail chub, Gila crassicauda (Miller 1963); California roach, Lavinia symmetricus 1 (Avise, Smith, and Ayala 1975); and

Sacramento blackfish, Orthodon microlepidotus (Hopkirk 1973). While hitch- roach hybrids may be locally abundant, the other hybrids are known only from a few individuals. The hitch-blackfish hybrid combination has been previously represented by a single juvenile individual from Coyote Creek, Alameda County (Hopkirk 1973). This note reports the presence of adult hitch-blackfish hybrids in the catches of commercial blackfish fishermen from San Luis Reservoir, Merced County. The hybrids are common and distinct enough that they wer

noticed by the fishermen and consequently called to our attention.

Notes: genetics; hitch; fish

notes

 

-not specifically clear lake

-pg 196

            -known hybridizations between hitch and thicktail chub, California roach (abundant), sacramento blackfish

            -hitch-blackfish found in February 1977

-pg 197

                        -believe hybrids are sterile

            -due to accidental mixing of gametes

                        -share similar spawning areas

URL: <Go to ISI>://A1981LX48400005

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 410

Author: P. B. Moyle and R. D. Nichols

Year: 1973

Title: Ecology of some native and introduced fishes of the Sierra Nevada foothills in Central California

Journal: Copeia

Issue: 3

Pages: 478-490

Short Title: Ecology of some native and introduced fishes of the Sierra Nevada foothills in Central California

Alternate Journal: Copeia

Accession Number: 4835001

Keywords: Freshwater

Q1 01381 General

Abstract: Collections were made of fishes occurring in the streams of the Sierra Nevada foothills in Central California. Environmental factors associated with each collection were recorded. Correlation analyses indicated which environmental factors affected the distribution of 11 of the 21 spp collected: Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis cyanellus, L. macrochirus, Gambusia affinis, Notemigonus crysoleucas, Lavinia exilicauda, Ptychocheilus grandis, Mylopharodon conocephalus, Hesperoleucus symmetricus, Catostomus occidentalis and Salmo gairdneri. The fishes were found to belong to 4 distinct fish associations, each found in a distinctive set of environmental conditions. The Rainbow Trout Association was found in the cold, clear permanent streams of the higher elevations. The California Beach Association was found in the small, warm Intermittent tributaries to the larger streams. The Native Cyprinid-Catostomid Association was found in the larger low elevation streams. The Introduced Fishes Association was found in low elevation intermittent streams that had been highly modified by man's activities.

Notes: hitch; fish; ONLINE

records keyed from 1974 ASFA printed journals

Journal Article

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/1443113.pdf

Author Address: Univ. California, Dep. Anim. Physiol. Davis, CA 95616 USA

 

 

Reference Type:  Conference Paper

Record Number: 411

Author: P. B. R. M. Y. Moyle

Year: 1992

Title: Fishes, aquatic diversity management areas, & endangeres species: A plan to protect california’s native aquatic biota

Conference Name: The California policy seminar

Publisher: University of California, Berkeley, Ca

Date: 1992

Keywords: 222 p

Abstract: Sacramento splittail were once widely distributed throughout the Central Valley, to which the species is endemic. Splittail have disappeared from much of their native range because of the loss or alteration of lowland habitats following dam construction, water diversion, and agricultural development. They are now largely confined to the Sacramento-San Joaquin estuary. Population levels appear to have fluctuated strongly over the past two decades, with a general decline since 1986, the last year of strong recruitment. Recruitment of young to the population evidently is episodic and depends upon sufficient flows in the lower reaches of rivers during spawning and subsequent high outflows through the Delta. Principal spawning areas and juvenile rearing habitat need to be identified and protected. Water management to maintain adequate water flows throughout the Delta at appropriate times will be necessary to promote successful population recruitment and, hence, preservation of the species.

Notes: fish

 

call # - QH76.5. C2 M6 1992

 

-not specifically clear lake

-pg 63

            -splittail endemic to central valley

            -now confined to sacramento-san Joaquin estuary

            -general decline in 1986

            -description

            -taxonomic relationships

-pg 64

            -early 1970’s P. ciscoides gone from clear lake

            -life history

            -habitat requirements

-pg 65

            -historic and current distribution and abundance

-pg 66

            -nature and degree of threat

 

 

Reference Type:  Journal Article

Record Number: 413

Author: G. I. Murphy

Year: 1948

Title: A contribution to the life history of the Sacramento perch (Archoplites interruptus) in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Journal: California Fish and Game

Volume: 34

Issue: (3)

Pages: 93-100

Date: 1948

Type of Article: Article

Short Title: A contribution to the life history of the Sacramento perch (Archoplites interruptus) in Clear Lake, Lake County, California

Accession Number: BIOSIS:PREV19492300000237

Call Number: call # - SK351 .C3 Shields UCD

Abstract: The Sacramento perch, a primitive centrarchid, is restricted to the Sacramento-San Joaquin and allied drainages. At the present time its numbers are greatly reduced. A brief study of the life history of this fish was made in 1947 The principal departure from the life histories of other members of the family Centrarchidae lies in the spawning behavior. Spawning Sacramento perch aggregate into schools and deposit their eggs on plants, bare rock, and algae covered rock without prior nest-building activity. Subsequent guarding of the eggs is probably non-existent, or at best, weakly developed, with the exception of territoriality of the males during spawning. It is possible that the failure of this fish to guard its exposed eggs is responsible for its marked reduction subsequent to the introduction of several possible "egg